Policing the Borders of Christianity

Brandy Daniels pens an intriguing piece at Religion Dispatches about the particular tradition in American Christianity to guard the borders of the faith.  (I said something similar in Relevant Magazine in 2006, but it’s no longer online, and I doubt anyone would remember anyway.)  Border guards are not what we need.  Border crossers are what we need.

I encourage you to read the whole post at RD, but here’s a taste:

Carter names what he calls a “profound pathology” at the heart of contemporary Christianity, in which Jesus names who belongs, and who does not—in effect “policing” the borders of the faith.

I would argue that this “border logic” that shapes racial-religious discourse (think of the Muslim cultural center in New York, the immigration debate in Arizona, etc.) is the same problematic theo-logic behind the borders that define public discourse on sexuality and religion.

via Stop Policing the Borders of Christianity | Sexuality/Gender | Religion Dispatches.

  • John Edmonds

    I think homosexual men and women should be allowed to marry, but that they should have to pay a sin tax for their marrage certificate.

    I think bisexual men and women should be allowed to marry two or more people to fulfill their sexual identity.

    I think transgender need to step up and be ordained. I think churches should hold a cross dressing seminar. Even Jesus put on a dress.

    I think that instead of churches sponsering the Boy Scouts, that they should be more accepting and sponser groups such as NAMBLA. All sexual identites are equal and should be treated as such, no matter what identity is thought up in a person’s mind.

  • dan

    I guess this post makes sense if you believe Christianity has no borders to police.

  • http://www.astatum.net Andrew

    Woah! I KNOW her! I had a class or two with Brandy in seminary. Great article…thanks for sharing.

  • PRT

    So it sorta leaves us in the position where Christianity should have no borders? I understand the openness grace demands, but love brings us into acceptance of others as well as confrontation. Perhaps not the sort of confrontation that seeks condemnation, but a confrontation that accepts the person but also states that perhaps there is a border here for how life is to be lived e.g. people who overtly abuse others is not right. So I ask, border crossers for what purpose?


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