Common English Bible: Free Today

Today and tomorrow, you can get the Common English Bible – ePub Edition for free. It’s a great translation, which we’ve been using at Solomon’s Porch recently.

What is the CEB?

The Common English Bible is not simply a revision or update of an existing translation. It is a bold new translation designed to meet the needs of Christians as they work to build a strong and meaningful relationship with God through Jesus Christ.

A key goal of the CEB translation team is to make the Bible accessible to a broad range of people; it’s written at a comfortable level for over half of all English readers. As the translators do their work, reading specialists from more than a dozen denominations review the texts to ensure a smooth and natural reading experience. Easy readability can enhance church worship and participation, and personal Bible study. It also encourages children and youth to discover the Bible for themselves, perhaps for the very first time.

Testimony in the Old Testament

Scot posted a review of Anathea Portier-Young’s book, Apocalypse against Empire: Theologies of Resistance in Early Judaism, last Saturday. I got to work with Thea a couple summers ago, when I taught at Sewanee Summer School. She’s great — one of the shining lights of the future of biblical studies.

Here’s a great video of her talking, passionately, about the Hebrew Scripture:

Maybe the Bible Teaches that We’re NOT Supposed to Obey God

So wonders Robert Burt of Yale Law School:

Whether we approach the Bible as believers in its truth or solely with an appreciation of its literary qualities, we cannot accurately understand the text if we overlook the deep doubts and fears of the characters, including their doubts about God’s wisdom. A close reading reveals many instances when human beings withhold allegiance from God – and seemingly with good reason.

One obvious example is in the book of Job, in which God authorizes the infliction of suffering on an innocent man to prove to Satan that Job will be loyal to Him. Job responds, however, by cursing the day he was born and threatening suicide, which he imagines would somehow punish God for the injustice he is suffering. “Soon I’ll be lying in the earth,” Job says. “When you come looking for me, I’ll be gone.”

There are other notable occasions. After Abraham is held back at the last moment from fulfilling God’s command to kill Isaac, he and God never speak again. Genesis does not proclaim this fact; it simply gives no record of any further communication between them, in contrast to the constant interactions between God and Abraham before this climactic event.

Read on to see why he thinks this means that civil authorities should not necessarily be obeyed eitherShould God be obeyed? Should the state?—A Commentary by Robert Burt ’64 | Yale Law School.

I Sure Hope the Bible Isn’t this Creepy

So, it seems that this image is making its way around the evangelicalfacebookosphere. Maybe it’s just me, but it really creeps me out. If you have that kind of relationship with the Bible, you may need counseling.

It also leads me to ask, What if the person getting the creepy hug were a man?



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