Arguing with Atheists

There’s a very big difference between, on the one hand, making a theological, philosophical, or scientific argument for the existence of God and, on the other hand, making a personal statement about why you still believe in God despite your doubts. Those are two very different types of communication.

I am keenly aware of the difference. I’ve written many posts here that are the former, and I’ve got an entire chapter already written for a forthcoming book that is along those lines, arguing with Aquinas’s famous “Five Ways.”

Yesterday’s post was surely not that. Yesterday’s post was the latter, an honest accounting of one of the several reasons that I continue to profess faith in God, in spite of the fact that I am beset with doubt.

But the biggest atheist blogger in the world picked it up, mocked it, told his readers that I had made the worst argument for the existence of God that he’d ever read, and pointed them here. They came, they told me I’m an idiot, and they left. (It’s shocking — shocking, I tell you! — that atheists don’t find one of my reasons for belief compelling.) I don’t imagine they’ll be back anytime soon.

So it goes in the blogosphere these days.

For those of you still reading, I was simply trying to say this: One of the reasons that I continue to have faith is that so many in the world do; so many — the vast majority, by anyone’s reckoning — that I cannot help but pay attention to that. I don’t think that all those people who believe in the divine, and all the billions who’ve preceded us on this plant who have believed similarly, are stupid lemmings. I think their belief deserves enough respect that I cannot shuck it off so very easily.

Take it or leave it. But I stand by it.

Be It Resolved…

There seems to be some hand wringing and teeth gnashing and garment rending in the leftie Christian blogosphere as the year winds down today. Some people are quitting things, while others are pulling in one million pageviews in a day (good for you, Adam!). In other news, dogs and cats are sleeping together. Etc.

Meanwhile, I’m coming off of a month of amazing times of travel, hunting, kids, cooking…and not enough writing. Not nearly enough writing. My book deadline is tomorrow, and I’ll miss it. But the book absolutely needs to get done by the end of January — it will release in Lent, 2015. In other writing commitments, I’ve got a chapter of a book due February 1 (attention, Baker Books, I’ll be late on that one, too). And then I’ll be writing an ebook, A Better Eucharist, to come out on Holy Week.

I’ve got a talk to prep for Christianity21 next week, and a sermon for House of Mercy later in January.

That’s a lot of content to churn out, and I lack the team of research assistants on which “Pastor Mark Driscoll” relies.

[Read more...]

Top Five Posts of 2013

On Friday, I highlighted some of the stats for the year at Theoblogy. Now it’s time for the big reveal. I’ve got some legacy posts that still get tons of hits, so this list won’t include those. Here are the top 2013 posts for traffic:

5. Premarital Sex — Maybe It’s Not So Bad

4. Rachel Held Evans: A Woman’s Voice

3. It’s Time for a Schism Regarding Women in the Church

2. Rob Bell Calls “Bullshit” on Christian Radio

[Read more...]

The Year at Theoblogy

It’s been a great year here at Theoblogy, and I thank you for reading. Visits, unique visitors, and pageviews were all up over 20% from 2012, and we crossed one million pageviews for the first time. That’s very gratifying.

The average visit lasted 1:50, which seems like an eternity on the internet.

Forty percent of you were new visitors this year.

Chrome is your favorite browser, followed by Safari and Firefox.

You’re about half Windows users, and half Mac.

Facebook is the biggest referrer, followed by Twitter. After the social sites and my own site, the biggest referrer was Rachel Held Evans (thanks, Rach!).

After “Tony Jones” and “Tony Jones blog,” other search terms that led you here were “Rob Bell” and “Don Piper” and “Problems in America.” Among the more random search terms: [Read more...]


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