The Future of Preaching

In the world of homiletics, not much has changed since Charles Wesley delivered monological sermons.

I’m sitting in the Buckhead Theater in Atlanta, about the take the stage with Doug Pagitt to talk about the future of preaching. We’re at the Festival of Homiletics, the premier conference about traditional preaching. The program is basically sermon-lecture-sermon-lecture. A person preaches, then later they give a lecture about what they were trying to do in their sermon. There’s also some singing peppered in between.

As you might guess, Doug and I will be delivering a different message.

We live in the most highly educated society and the most highly participatory culture in the history of humankind. Everything around us has changed: the clothes we wear, the way we transport ourselves, how we communicate.

And yet, 99% of preachers stand up on Sunday morning and deliver a monologue. A soliloquy.

And their churches decline. And they wring their hands.

There is another way. There is a way of participation and inclusion and dialogue and conversation.

That’s what Doug and I will propose this morning.

I wonder if anyone will listen.

Brian McLaren, Nadia Bolz-Weber, Lauren Winner, Shane Hipps, Bruce Reyes-Chow, Lillian Daniel, and Mark Scandrette Walk Into a Bar…

I am extremely proud of this product for congregational study and adult faith formation. The video below is the first sneak peek. To find out more info when it becomes available this summer, sign up HERE.

This May Become the First Truly Flat Church

An artist's rendering of the proposed Cardboard Cathedral

The Christchurch Cathedral in New Zealand was destroyed by an earthquake. Since it will take years to rebuild, there’s a cardboard cathedral going up first.

Around 40 people gathered at the cleared demolition site on the fringe of the city’s red zone cordon to hear the official announcement of the city’s $5 million temporary cardboard cathedral.

The Anglican Church today revealed plans for the “transitional” cathedral designed by a top Japanese “paper architect”.

While debate rages over the decision by the Anglican Diocese of Christchurch to demolish the crippled city centre landmark, work will start on the temporary A-frame building in nearby Latimer Square next week.

Constructed with cardboard tubes, timber beams, structural steel, and concrete, it is expected to last 20 years and will become the new place of worship for the city’s St John’s parish, whose church, vicarage and hall had to be demolished after the February 22 shake.

via $5m cardboard cathedral for Chch – National – NZ Herald News.

There’s No Theology Like Reformed Theology

This amazing ad came in the “Dollars and Sense” mailer last week. Comments very welcome.


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