This May Become the First Truly Flat Church

An artist's rendering of the proposed Cardboard Cathedral

The Christchurch Cathedral in New Zealand was destroyed by an earthquake. Since it will take years to rebuild, there’s a cardboard cathedral going up first.

Around 40 people gathered at the cleared demolition site on the fringe of the city’s red zone cordon to hear the official announcement of the city’s $5 million temporary cardboard cathedral.

The Anglican Church today revealed plans for the “transitional” cathedral designed by a top Japanese “paper architect”.

While debate rages over the decision by the Anglican Diocese of Christchurch to demolish the crippled city centre landmark, work will start on the temporary A-frame building in nearby Latimer Square next week.

Constructed with cardboard tubes, timber beams, structural steel, and concrete, it is expected to last 20 years and will become the new place of worship for the city’s St John’s parish, whose church, vicarage and hall had to be demolished after the February 22 shake.

via $5m cardboard cathedral for Chch – National – NZ Herald News.

There’s No Theology Like Reformed Theology

This amazing ad came in the “Dollars and Sense” mailer last week. Comments very welcome.

Stop Praying In Church

Aloud, that is. That’s my contribution to the Pomomusings series, “(Re)Imaging Chrisitianity:

This post is part of an ongoing blog series on Pomomusings entitled “(Re)Imagining Christianity.”

What is one belief, practice or element of Christianity that must die so that Christianity can move forward and truly impact the world in the next 100 years?

What is one belief, practice or element of Christianity that we must hold onto and live out more fully so that Christianity can move forward and truly impact the world in the next 100 years?

I’m going to keep this brief: I think that we should stop having spoken prayers in worship services.

Read the rest of my post here: Tony Jones on (Re)Imagining Christianity – Pomomusings.

English Evangelicals

They’re shaking up the Church of England:

A handful of big evangelically-minded parishes now exercise huge influence, far beyond their immediate patch. Saint Helen’s in Bishopsgate reaches out to workers in London’s financial district; it has “planted” a dozen new communities in other places, using an American model of religious expansion. Holy Trinity, Brompton has exported a charismatic brand of Christianity via the Alpha course. Meanwhile All Souls in Langham Place, which shares a neighbourhood with department stores, broadcasters and arty bohemians, radiates forth a more sober brand of evangelism. What all these churches have in common is a reluctance to do the Church of England’s traditional job of marrying, baptising or burying people who have no real religious commitment. That is a break with Anglicanism’s familiar role as the undemanding “default mode” of faith for a secular country.

Read the rest: The Church of England: Hot and bothered | The Economist.


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