Where Is God’s Wrath Burning Now?

In the past couple years, John Piper has been outspoken about any number of tragedies, from earthquakes and tsunamis and hurricanes to the collapse of a freeway bridge. However, he’s been conspicuously quiet this summer, even as Colorado burns.

Aerial photograph of the Waldo Canyon Fire in Colorado Springs, Colorado between June 24, 2012 and June 27, 2012 show the destructive path of the fire. Photo by John Wark, www.johnwark.com 

Meanwhile, just a few hundred miles away, we in Minnesota got enough rain to destroy parts of Duluth and to raise Lake Superior 3 inches — that’s estimated to be 17 trillion gallons of water.

Vermilion Road in Duluth after flooding within Tischer Creek drainage. (Photo by John Goodge/MPR)

The problem with Piper’s outbursts — theologically speaking — is that he portrays a God who is entirely arbitrary. God’s wrath burns against our sin, always and unremittingly — that’s Piper’s argument. God’s grace usually holds back God’s wrath, thus protecting us from tragedies of all sorts. But on occasion, God allows his wrath to burst through, and then people die horribly.

This is a very primitive view of God. To think that God uses weather to punish people for sin is right up there with thinking that a man was born blind because of his parents’ sin. (While Jesus rejected this kind of thinking, I don’t find his response — “this happened to that the works of God might be displayed in him” — much more palatable.)

The Greeks and Romans feared a built temples to appease the gods of Mt. Olympus, gods who were known to be arbitrary. They fought each other, fell in love with humans, and otherwise behaved like teenagers — and humans paid the price.

I’d like to think that the God of Israel is a good deal better than that — that YHWH/Abba is a God who is reasonable and understandable. That the true God is worshipped by us because we love him, and because he’s made himself understandable to us.

I don’t think God uses the weather to punish us.

Nor — with all due respect to my Colorado friends who are praying for rain — do I think that God sends rain as a result of prayers. Because you can’t have one without the other. If you believe that God sends rain in mercy, you’ve also got to believe that God sends wildfires in his wrath.

Growing Up in the 70s: The Boy Who Liked Deer

My friend Jim and I are going to see Rush in concert in September. That’s been a lifelong dream of mine (yes, I’m a man of big dreams). In tribute to all the wonderful aspects of coming of age in the 1970s and 80s, I’m going to run an occasional series on some of the cultural touchstones for those of us who are proudly GenX.

Here’s another classic film that was shown annually when I was in elementary school: The Boy Who Liked Deer. In this one, a boy who likes deer (hence the title) falls in with the wrong crowd. The bad kids poison the deer. The kid feels bad.

You can watch it all on this YouTube playlist. The first segment is below.

Here’s what’s interesting: the last film I wrote about, Cipher in the Snow was produced by Brigham Young University, and this one is by the LDS Church. Stranger still that they’d show those in my school.

Did they show movies like this in your elementary school?

Growing Up in the 70s: Cipher in the Snow

My friend Jim and I are going to see Rush in concert in September. That’s been a lifelong dream of mine (yes, I’m a man of big dreams). In tribute to all the wonderful aspects of coming of age in the 1970s and 80s, I’m going to run an occasional series on some of the cultural touchstones for those of us who are proudly GenX.

First, a movie that was shown every year in my elementary school. It’s called Cipher in the Snow. It’s from 1974. The plot is basically this: A kid can’t get a seat on the bus, so he asks to get off, whereupon he dies in a snowbank. Cause of death: no one was nice to him.

Watch it below, in two parts, and tell me if you can believe that they showed this to 3rd graders.

Bringing Minnesota and Texas Together

As you may recall, the marriage of Tony and Courtney united the two states on either end of I-35. To commemorate that, Courtney made a pillow that symbolizes that union. If you ever visit our house, you will betray your allegiances.


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