New Feminist Christianity [Book Week]

new feminist christianity

This fall I’m teaching Introduction to Theology at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. Over the past decade, I’ve taught about a dozen different courses at half-a-dozen different schools. I’ll say that halfway into the semester, this is one of my favorites. I’ve been loving the task of introducing incoming seminary students to the richness of the theological task.

Having queried existing students at UTS about their experiences, I got the sense that they were well versed on contemporary contextual theologies (feminist, black, liberation, queer), but maybe weren’t so informed about the overall landscape of theology. Mine is a hybrid course — meeting half online and half in-person, with three all-day sessions, separated by a month. That meant that the course naturally divided itself into three parts.

Traditionally, those three parts would have been trinitarian in nature, encompassing what seminary profs like to consider the three volumes of the theological encyclopedia. When I took my three required classes in systematic theology at Fuller Theological Seminary back in the day, they broke down along these very lines: [Read more...]

A Tale of Three Seminaries

Twin Cities seminaries

The Twin Cities boasts three Protestant seminaries (forgive me if I don’t consider John Piper’s unaccredited school a seminary in full standing). They are Luther Seminary, United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities, and Bethel Seminary. And I think that the rising and falling fortunes of these three can tell us something interesting about the landscape of the church in America today. [Disclosure: I teach at United, I am part of a Templeton grant at Luther, and I once made out with a girl in the trees behind Bethel. I have friends who teach at all three.]

Luther Seminary was initially founded in 1917 as the merger of three Norwegian Lutheran seminaries. Another merger with Augsburg Seminary (also Norwegian) happened in 1963, and yet another merger in 1976 with Northwestern Lutheran Theological Seminary (English) led to Luther Northwestern Seminary. In 1994, they simplified the name to Luther Seminary. Luther is the largest of the eight seminaries of the ELCA denomination — with incoming classes of well over 100 — but it has recently fallen on hard times. Due to falling enrollment and financial mismanagement, the president and CFO were let go and many faculty and staff were laid off.

United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities was also formed by a merger. In 1957, the United Church of Christ denomination was formed out of the merger of a couple denoms, and in 1962, UTS was founded as the merger of Yankton School of Theology (German Congregational) and Mission House (German Reformed). In the 1970s and 80s, UTS was at the forefront of liberalism, particularly feminist theology, and was among the first seminaries to enroll openly gay students. But their star faded, and in the last few years, incoming classes were in the low 30s. Today it serves primarily UCC, UMC, and UUA students.

Bethel Seminary was initially founded in Chicago in 1871. In 1914, it was acquired by the Baptist General Conference denomination and moved to Minnesota. Always evangelical in its outlook, Bethel made news in the 1990s when professors John Piper and Greg Boyd squared off, resulting in Boyd’s resignation and Piper’s withdrawal from Bethel and the BGC. In its heyday, Bethel was welcoming over 200 new students every year, but recently they’ve laid off all of their church historians as well as several other faculty members.

Here’s the interesting part:

[Read more...]

Same As It Ever Was

Me, contemplating a return to the Internet. (photo by Courtney Perry)

Me, contemplating a return to the Internet. (photo by Courtney Perry)

So, I took 6 weeks off of the Internet, and I feel fine. Didn’t miss it all that much. In case you’re curious, here’s what I did:

1) Finished the second draft of my manuscript, Did God Kill Jesus? and sent it off to the publisher. Haven’t heard back yet, but I’m hoping they consider it an improvement. I do. Most days over the past six week, I wrote 6-8 hours per day. More on the book tomorrow.

2) Harvested bushels of produce from our garden.

3) Canned much of that produce. Final count: 12 jars beans, 6 jars beets, 12 jars pickles, 12 jars relish, 4 jars onions, 2 jars tomatoes, 6 loaves zucchini bread. The tomatoes are still coming. And 4 heads of cabbage are (hopefully) becoming sauerkraut in the basement.

[Read more...]

Time for Some Theology

If you’re in the market to study theology, then I’ve got some opportunities for you.

At the M.Div. level, I am teaching Introduction to Theology next fall at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. (Click through to read more about the course and see the book list.) I’ve been named Professor in the Practice of Theology at UTS (still an adjunct position, which suits me). I’m really excited about teaching this survey course. It’s a hybrid course, so it only meets three times — all day on three Mondays — and otherwise it’s online. So if you’re considering an M.Div., this is a good way to dip your toe in the water. (More news coming soon on a new venture in theological education here in the Twin Cities.)

If you’re in the market for a D.Min., there are a couple option, both at Fuller Theological Seminary. First, I’ll be teaching a week-long course on Spirituality and the Doctrine of Creation in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in September. This class takes place in canoes and around fire pits and has an amazing reading list. More about this course in the video above.

Secondly, I’ll be starting a new D.Min. cohort through Fuller next spring. This is a great way to get a D.Min., since we spent 3+ years together. My first cohort is just now working on their final projects, and the 10 of us have grown very close. Several readers have written over the past couple years and asked when the new cohort is happening, and the answer is now!


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