Welcome No Longer Quivering to Patheos!

No Longer Quivering has moved to Patheos.  The blog is a resource for anyone fleeing the Quiverfull/Christian Patriarchy movement.  Libby Anne, a Patheos blogger at Love, Joy, Feminism, got her start blogging by telling the story of her escape from this abusive religious sect.

It looks like the move-in is still in progress, so, although new posts will show up at the new site, the tabs, forum, etc are still getting set up, so you should use these links to read NLQ’s About and FAQ.

For me, the most terrifying aspect of this sect is its isolation from the secular world.  Lax homeschooling regulations in many states means it’s legal for Quiverfull parents to under-educate their daughters (since, from the parents’ point of view, they won’t have careers or be decision makers anyway).  One of the many reasons I love the public school system is because it’s a check on the influence of parents.  I’d rather have kids with excellent parents chafed a little by unpleasant parts of mainstream culture than leave kids with really problematic parents in isolation.

About Leah Libresco

Leah Anthony Libresco graduated from Yale in 2011. She works as an Editorial Assistant at The American Conservative by day, and by night writes for Patheos about theology, philosophy, and math at www.patheos.com/blogs/unequallyyoked. She was received into the Catholic Church in November 2012."

  • Peter S.

    Um… the banner misspells “Quivering.”

    • Peter S.

      Oh wait… I get it. Never mind.

  • http://prodigalnomore.wordpress.com/ The Ubiquitous

    One of the many reasons I love the public school system is because it’s a check on the influence of parents.

    Less a check and more a checkmate, perhaps.

    I’d rather have kids with excellent parents chafed a little by unpleasant parts of mainstream culture than leave kids with really problematic parents in isolation.

    Quiverfull, ultimate fruition that it is of Protestant ideas about marriage, remains contemptible. Still, your statement really overreaches.

    • @b

      Point #1, you’re thinking of something more like boarding school. Parents locked out. Isolation proper.

      Point #2, imagine a child raised in a cult. Then moving to the big city to secure an income. Isolation writ large.

      • http://prodigalnomore.wordpress.com/ The Ubiquitous

        It doesn’t take a boarding school to lock out parents.

        Point two doesn’t make sense.

  • http://darwincatholic.blogspot.com DarwinCatholic

    Lax homeschooling regulations in many states means it’s legal for Quiverfull parents to under-educate their daughters (since, from the parents’ point of view, they won’t have careers or be decision makers anyway). One of the many reasons I love the public school system is because it’s a check on the influence of parents. I’d rather have kids with excellent parents chafed a little by unpleasant parts of mainstream culture than leave kids with really problematic parents in isolation.

    Come to that, lax public schools in many municipalities mean its legal for public schools to under-educate all children — something which given the state of education in our country arguably happens to a significantly larger number of children than being kept intentionally uneducated by severely misguided homeschooling parents.

    There are decent reasons to be against homeschooling, or maybe in favor of more regulation (though given that we’re so bad at measuring the effectiveness of in-classroom public school teachers following established curriculums — see standardized testing debate — I’m skeptical as to how effectively states can actually regulate out-0f-classroom teachers using a huge variety of curriculums) but to do so because one imagines secular public schools to be a good check on the small number of borderline cultic homeschoolers seems like taking a shootgun to hunt a mosquito. This is the same kind of logic that leads misguided conservatives to urge the legal harassment or restriction of Muslims in order to get at the tiny percentage who might have some interest in terrorism. One has to consider whether the harassment or restriction of the majority is really worth the marginal impact one has on the minority. In a free society, the answer is generally that it is not.

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