Which Apologetics Need Answers?

JT Eberhard of Freethought Blogs has some as-of-yet unspecified project in the works, and he’s put out a request for help:

I need to know what arguments you’ve heard for god’s existence. Which one, in particular, would you like to see me take a swing at?

That sounds like a job for… the religiously diverse, scrappy, mostly well behaved commentariat of Unequally Yoked!

JT is accepting requests all weekend, but, since he hasn’t described the project, I don’t know exactly what he’s after, so I recommend giving him the best arguments you’ve heard.  If you’ve already got a totally satisfactory answer to some of the dumber approaches (like, oh, the argument from radical skepticism that I got pitched on at Reason Rally), you won’t need JT to write up the bleedin’ obvious.  The atheist blogosphere spends a lot of time addressing the most common arguments, which are not necessarily the most challenging ones.

So pop on over to JT’s and tell him the argument you found hardest to rebut or kept bothering you after the debate was over.  It doesn’t have to be a knockdown proof of god, just something that made you shift your confidence level a bit.  I assume Christians can place requests, too, but keep in mind that the apologetics that Christians find most compelling are not necessarily those that make atheists sweat.

And feel free to crosspost your comments here.  I’d be interested to see what you guys come up with.  (I’m not sure what to contribute, yet, since a number of my problems are rooted in a neo-Platonist view of morality, which I don’t think JT shares).

 

Also: remember when I was discussing Edward Feser’s The Last Superstition with some Dominicans?  The writer at Somewhat Abnormal is blogging his way through some of the arguments, if people want to pick up that fight again.

 

About Leah Libresco

Leah Anthony Libresco graduated from Yale in 2011. She works as an Editorial Assistant at The American Conservative by day, and by night writes for Patheos about theology, philosophy, and math at www.patheos.com/blogs/unequallyyoked. She was received into the Catholic Church in November 2012."

  • http://somewhatabnormal.blogspot.com/ Robert Oerter

    Thanks for the link, Leah! You always have such good discussions here – I hope some folks stop over and engage at my blog.

  • John Franklin

    Nice project JT – some arguments have been around a long time – that scrappy little one known as the ontologcial argument has had a ‘life’ of 1000 years or so – though Kant took a swing at it – it appears it wasn’t down for the count… lots of discussion since Kant supporting the argument.

    Now I don’t know if you just have too much time on your hands as so took on this project or whether you hope to be successful in providing “defeaters” for the arguments proposed.

    You should be careful you don’t get trapped in the cage of rationality where all is decided by “argument” as though reason is the last court of appeal for all that is true. Plenty of folk doubt that view these days.

    There are a lot of folks out there who believe in God – but the God they believe in is not the conclusion of an argument. So when you ask for arguments for God’s existence – one is inclined to ask which God are you thinking of – to show that the God of the philosophers cannot be proven – is a very small achievement and likely has little or no bearing whatsoever of the truth or falsehood of whether there is a God. Divinity is elusive to be sure and there is little hope that reason (argument) will get you far in pinning down the divine one way or another….jf

  • @b

    I suppose JT is looking fledgling rhetorical defences.

    Wikipedia lists theology’s arguments and subsequent academic criticisms.


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