“Hey! I didn’t say ‘Science Says’”

Helen Rittelmeyer is blogging and writing again.  She just contributed to the American Spectator's Youth Symposium, claiming that relativism is no longer conservatism's greatest enemy.  Let me grab a pull quote. In the last culture war, relativism’s influence was evident in the stock arguments that kept appearing in magazines and op-ed pages: Breaking taboos is valuable for its own sake; people have a right to make their own choices and not be judged for it; what you call a social evil is real … [Read more...]

How Big a Hit are You Willing to Take?

As you may recall, concussions in football is one of my hobbyhorses.  So of course I was interested when I saw that Kevin Cook had a NYT op-ed on the subject.  If you follow the topic, you've probably seen most of the data, but he had some interesting information about how the NFL screens players: The N.F.L. now uses simple written or computerized cognitive tests to assess concussions. Before each season, players are shown a page featuring 20 words and asked to write down as many as they remem … [Read more...]

Is Sufficiently Compressed Thinking Indistinguishable from Magical Thinking?

Andrew Brown is in The Guardian claiming any sufficiently interesting theory of the world is indistinguishable from religion.  There's a lot to debate there, but do you mind if I put the broader issue aside for a second to come to the defense of science!  Brown writes: And atheism can be just as theologically incorrect: today's paper told me that: "our bodies are built and controlled by far fewer genes than scientists had expected". The metaphors of "building" and "controlling" have here taken a … [Read more...]

A Mormon Perspective on Interrogating Emotions

It's a guest post by Michael Haycock!  He blogs aperiodically at Not a Tame Lion, and helped clear up factual questions about Romney's priesthood along with more abstract questions about Mormon theology of priesthood the last time he guestblogged here.  Now he's popping in to talk about conversions than win over hearts as well as minds in the light of a recent On the Square piece.It is a typical indictment of Mormon proselytization and practice that it’s all predicated on untrustworthy or … [Read more...]

The Epistemological Weight of Warm Fuzzies

I was reading an On the Square post from a Mormon to Catholic convert and was struck by the way he described his enounter with grace: Early in the evening of May 28, 2010, I am attending Mass in the majestic Basilica di Sant’Apollinare next to the Pontificia Università della Santa Croce in Rome. From Utah I have come as a scholar to deliver a paper at an international conference on the work of the great Catholic philosopher Dietrich von Hildebrand, and I have come as a tourist to see the Et … [Read more...]

That Moment We Saw You For What You Really Are

choosing a mask

The "Welcome to JT" thread has digressed into a number of interesting discussions (parental authority over children, what to make of data that suggests the people you think are wrong are doing better than you, etc).  And I do want to throw this less wrong post on envying "irrational" choices into the mix, but the comment I want to highlight is on a different subject.  Clarissa wrote: Yeah, JT presents himself as a nice guy, but he can turn on a dime into a vicious attack dog.I don’t trust gu … [Read more...]

Tell all the Truth, but tell it slant

I received a comped reviewer's copy of Beauty Will Save the World: Recovering the Human in an Ideological Age from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute.I enjoyed reading Gregory Wolfe's Beauty Will Save the World, but I'm not sure that it's a book best read straight through, as I did.  The second best way to read it probably reading the first section, in which Wolfe lays out his thesis, and then dipping in and out of his profiles of writers and artists over a few months, with frequent br … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X