A Few Stories Worth Their Salt

After hearing today's readings at Mass, I wanted to share a favorite non-fiction book with you all.  For those who don't attend Mass, today's gospel reading was from Matthew 5:13-16: Jesus said to his disciples: “You are the salt of the earth. But if salt loses its taste, with what can it be seasoned? It is no longer good for anything but to be thrown out and trampled underfoot. You are the light of the world. A city set on a mountain cannot be hidden. Nor do they light a lamp and then put it … [Read more...]

An Attraction to Orthodoxy (Series)

As part of my Sunday's Good Book series, I posted about G.K. Chesterton's Orthodoxy and explained that there was a lot that I found compelling and challenging about his philosophy.  Since that's a sorta weird thing for an atheist to say, discussion ensued and is ongoing.  Here's all the posts on this topic to date: I Assign You Reading! - As a prelude to my discussion of Chesterton, I highlighted an essay by Eve Tushnet about when, if ever, people should let their ethics refute t … [Read more...]

Strobel’s One-Sided Cases

I’m reviewing Lee Strobel’s The Case for Christ: A Journalist's Personal Investigation of the Evidence for Jesus and The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity together since my objections to both of them are pretty much the same. I was more interested in The Case for Christ, which focuses on evidence for the historical Christ and his divinity than The Case for Faith which focused on theodicy. I don’t view theodicy as that much of a problem for … [Read more...]

7 Quick Takes (1/21/11)

--1-- Earlier this week, I posted the lengthy list of books that readers recommended in response to my New Year's Challenge.  I've been looking through the list, and I'm narrowing down some books to start with.  This Sunday, I'll be posting my thoughts about Lee Strobel's The Case for Faith, a book I was in the middle of before I solicited suggestions.  The books that follow are the one's I'm most inclined to read next, so they may be showing up on a "Sunday's Good Book" feature sooner rather th … [Read more...]

The Hefty, Crowdsourced Syllabus

Many of the people who replied to my New Year's Challenge to change my opinions about religion proposed books I should read.  Right up my alley, I thought, until I realized how very many books you all have read and enjoyed.  I'm going to pick out six or seven to start with and commit to reading one to two a month, so I don't get overwhelmed, but that means I won't get to a lot of these.I've posted the full list here both as a reference for other atheists who might wonder what Christians want … [Read more...]

Taking a Wrong Turn in the Moral Landscape

 I really, really wanted to like Sam Harris’s The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. A large proportion of my philosophical disagreements with my boyfriend and with Christians generally center on the question of whether a belief in absolute morality is compatible with atheism, so I had my fingers crossed that this book would be useful to me as a rebuttal.Alas.The problems start with Harris’s definition of science: Some people [define] “science” in exceedi … [Read more...]

Ethics Without Other People are Empty

I don’t understand ethical systems or teleology meant for humans that doesn’t talk about our relationships to other humans.That, in a nutshell, is why I hated Steve Antinoff’s Spiritual Atheism. Antinoff tries to find a way for atheists to live without God. He writes ”Spiritual atheism begins with a triple realization: that our experience of ourselves and our world leaves us ultimately dissatisfied, that our dissatisfaction is intolerable and must be broken through, and that there is no God. … [Read more...]


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