Granny Weatherwax and Discworld [Index Post]

When I first started this blog, I was casting about for a few types of post I could repeat every week in order to get on a regular schedule.  The one that felt the most natural was a feature I named "Weatherwax Wednesdays" where I used a quote from Terry Pratchett's Discworld, usually involving the character Granny Weatherwax, as a jumping off point to talk about moral philosophy.Introducing Weatherwax Wednesday -- Who is Granny Weatherwax, and why do I love her so?"It’d be in me li … [Read more...]

Caution! Philosophy in Progress.

Remember you can vote once per day for the About.com Atheism Awards.  I’m one of five nominees for Best Atheist Blog.  More details here.Last year, Theatre J sold out its run of New Jerusalem: The Interrogation of Baruch de Spinoza, so if you're in the DC area and I didn't successfully drag you to the show this past Wednesday, you had best get your tickets soon. The play is inspired by the excommunication of Baruch Spinoza by his synagogue and spins out a confrontation between him, a Chris … [Read more...]

Epistemology Thought Experiment on Prime Time TV

Remember you can vote once per day for the About.com Atheism Awards.  I’m one of five nominees for Best Atheist Blog.  More details here.Last night I caught the series premiere of Awake on Hulu and I found it captivating.  The basic setup: Detective Michael Britten (played by Jason Isaacs -- Lucius Malfoy) is in a terrible car accident.  After the crash his life bifurcates.  In one reality, his wife died in the crash.  In the other, he lost his son.  He lives a full day in one world, goes to … [Read more...]

Lewis Trounces Freud

I've already blogged once about reading Freud's Last Session, a two person play that is an extended argument between C.S. Lewis and Sigmund Freud, but now I've gotten the chance to see it performed.  (And it looks like it's running through May at the New World Stages in NYC, if anyone fancies seeing it.)When I saw it, I tried to keep score in my head of who was winning or who had the upper hand, since I was particularly interesting in how the changing dynamics of the debate were mirrored in … [Read more...]

[Feser] Stuck in the Map-Territory Gap

As promised yesterday, this is the kickoff of my analysis of and questions about Edward Feser's The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism.  Yesterday, in the index post, I pasted in Feser's summary of Aristotle's Four Causes which you may want to refer back to.  I'm interested in Feser's book because he's making the pitch that if you believe in moral order and some kind of telos for people, Christianity will follow inexorably.  Since I fit the first part of his modus ponens, I want t … [Read more...]

Reading a Book I’d Never Write

I've just finished Sara Miles's memoir Take this Bread: A Radical Conversion, but I don't think I can write my usual style of review.  Miles was raised by atheists (although she had missionaries a couple generations back), is a liberal lesbian, and converted to Episcopalianism in midlife.  I'm always interested in the logic of converts, especially when they're a good match for me demographically, but Miles and I are way too far apart conceptually for me to have anything substantive to say about h … [Read more...]

Feser’s The Last Superstition [Index Post]

I ran into a Dominican at an American Association for the Advancement of Sciences event in DC, and now I'm reading and arguing about Edward Feser's The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the Last Atheism with him and another brother at the priory.This seems like a nice opportunity to explore the 'non-nihilistic metaphysics logically require theism and probably Christianity' pitch that I've gotten from plenty of Christians and more than a few atheists.  Hopefully the discussion will put me in … [Read more...]