My Tribe by Alberto Blanco: A Way to Belong

In celebration of National Poetry Month, a translation from the great Mexican poet Alberto Blanco. In a few short sentences, Blanco excludes exclusion. My Tribe From lake to lake, from forest to forest: “Which is my tribe?” —I wonder— “What is my place?”  Perhaps I belong to the tribe of those who have no tribe; [Read More...]

Happy Earth Day

It feels a bit strange to say it—Happy Earth Day—a bit like saying “Happy Memorial Day” or “Happy Holocaust Day of Remembrance.” Some things are important to think about, and to honor, without being particularly happy. I don’t know about you, but I spend quite a bit of time thinking about climate change, about the [Read More...]

Commit2Respond

The Unitarian Universalist (UU) faith has taken the stand that “Advancing the human rights of communities affected by climate change is a moral imperative.” The UU Commit2Respond call to action declares: “As people of faith and conscience, we have a responsibility to defend our home and care for each other, working to be in solidarity [Read More...]

What’s in the Way is the Way: Stoicism and the Spaces Between

I sit at the roadside; The driver changes the wheel. I don’t like where I’m coming from. I don’t like where I’m going. Why do I watch this wheel change Impatiently? This poem, by German playwright and poet Bertolt Brecht, catches that feeling of being in-between. In process. In liminal space. We all know about [Read More...]

Reason is Dead; Long Live . . . Advanced Hindsight

JUSTICE IS A SNACK AWAY Justice. It may be a meal best served cold, but not on an empty stomach. Israeli Neuroscientist and business professor Shai Danziger studied the correlation between food and the likelihood that a judge will grant prisoners parole. In the morning, just after breakfast, the chances of parole are high—around sixty-five [Read More...]

#RFRA, Soapy Cilantro, and Tasty Gods

(Or: A Little Demonstration of What Religious Freedom Looks Like) POLARIZATION Cilantro. It’s a polarizing vegetable. Many love it. Many hate it. For some, it is just the fresh touch needed to make Mexican and Thai cuisine perfect. For others, cilantro tastes like Ivory Soap. An unbridgeable chasm, it would appear. Three genes have been [Read More...]

a love poem for a holy week

Happiness is this moment alive in the sunshine knowing I am Loved.   [Read more...]

Religious Arguments: Where Are the Grownups?

RABBITS In November of 1726 news reached London that a physician had assisted a woman named Mary Tofts as she gave birth to . . . a rabbit. The rabbit, unfortunately, died. Mary Tofts got quite a lot of attention. And even more attention when she gave birth to yet another rabbit—or, well, at least [Read More...]

The Transient, the Permanent, and the Stitching Horse: What Remains True in Religions

When I was a kid, I loved wandering in the barn on my grandfather’s farm. The barn had been built around a two-story log house. In the loft of the barn was a jumble of old farming equipment. My favorite piece of equipment there was what was known as a stitching horse. This was a [Read More...]


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