Raise A Glass To My Friends…A Memorial Poem

Ipomea su Alocasia photo by Turinboy. Licensed under CC 2.0

The Pagan community lost another leader yesterday with the passing of Morning Glory Zell. She was a glorious visionary and a friend. I planted Morning Glories today in honor of her. Then I wrote this poem for all our foremothers and forefathers who have crossed the veil that I am honored to have known. Raise A Glass For Morning Glory, Donald Michael Kraig, Ted Andrews, Isaac Bonewits, and the rest... thank you. I raise a glass to my friends,to chase my tears,to not think … [Read more...]

Ancestor Hash Browns with Sweet Potato Recipe

Ancestor Hash Browns with Sweet Potato Recipe. Photo by Lilith Dorsey, copyright 2014.

It could be Beltane, it could be Samhain (Halloween), it's always a great time to celebrate your ancestors. They are responsible for you being here today. One of the easiest ways to honor your ancestors is right in your own kitchen. The following recipe is designed to bring about healing with magickal herbs like parsley and basil, and honoring celebration of those that have gone before with sweet potatoes. While I was writing the African-American Ritual Cookbook, I seriously considered titling … [Read more...]

ForeMama Said: Wit and Wisdom of Maya Deren

Homage to Maya Deren photo by Derrick Tyson. Text added. Licensed under CC 2.0

Maya Deren, was a visionary, an author, a filmmaker, a Voodoo priestess who supposedly got possessed at cocktail parties. I too am an author, a filmmaker and Voodoo priestess, but I hope I handle my stuff better at cocktail parties, but maybe not. Deren was an inspiration to many, not just with her films, but with her words.  Maya Deren Quotes  “Myth is the facts of the mind made manifest in a fiction of matter.” - Maya DerenAbout her first film Meshes in the Afternoon she … [Read more...]

Would You Go to a Voodoo Funeral Home? Could you?

Would you go... photo by Lilith Dorsey.

The whole thing started with a hand. Not a mojo hand, made of herbs and other spiritual items, that jazz legends like Muddy Waters and Lightning Hopkins liked to sing about, but a real hand. J.S. Holland on the blog Report from the Florida Zone writes today about a Voodoo Funeral Home that found itself in an interesting situation back in the late 1990's. The story is this, in November 1997 a hand was discovered in the Manatee River. The hand had been removed by funeral embalmer Paula … [Read more...]

Honor Your Ancestors and Native People with Corn Maque Choux

Corn Maque Choux photo by Lilith Dorsey. Copyright 2014.

New Orleans has a unique flavor all its own: the jazz, the Voodoo, the streetcar, and the food. Oh, how we love the food. Maque Choux is a Southern Louisiana corn delicacy. As usual in New Orleans, no one is exactly sure how the dish got its name. Maque Choux (pronounced Mock Shoe) could possibly come from the Cajun French term maigrchou, which translates as “thin child” and may refer to the thinning of the recipe with cream or milk according to wisegeek.com. The recipe is similar to creamed cor … [Read more...]

Creating Ancestor Altars in Santeria, Vodou, and Voodoo

Energia y Espiritu Altar #5 photo by wendEwho! Thompson. Text added. Licensed under CC 2.0

Ancestor Altars and shrines are a part of many different religions. They are present in Christian homes, Buddhist homes, Pagan homes, and even in Atheists' homes. They can be as simple as a glass of water and a picture of Grandpa, or given an entire room to spread out in. Let me begin by making the distinction that altars are usually created for a specific purpose, while shrines are generally set up as a way of honoring what is represented. A ancestor shrine is a site to honor those who have … [Read more...]

Nzinga: Africa’s Queen Who Made Them Call Her King!

Inspirations... photo shared by Carvalheiro Vagner. Licensed under CC 2.0 text added.

March is Women's History month, and as usual I am left bemoaning the lesser known female heroes everywhere. In that spirit I wish to tell you a little bit about one amazing fierce African Queen Nzinga. Nzinga was named according to tradition because her umbilical cord was wrapped around her neck (the Kimbundu verb kujinga means to twist,)  this is said to mean the person would be proud. She lived up to her name becoming a inspirational visionary and a foremother to  modern warrior women e … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X