Ugandan gay group responds to recent campaign against homosexuality

What goes around comes around. In Uganda, the same kind of either-or arguments are being offered about the origins of homosexuality in order to gain political advantage. It is easy to see why same-sex attracted people would gravitate toward authorities who say their attractions are inborn. One does not need to propose a plot of cosmic proportions to understand that homosexuals in Uganda are afraid for their safety and counter the misinformation of the recent American visitors with inborn theories. Truth is, in any given case, we don’t know. If the last sentence of the article is an accurate representation of Mr. Mukasa’s views, there are many doing this research who would agree: “Mukasa however says homosexuals are normal people born like any child but develop a natural attraction to the same sex.”

I just posted a video of Stephen Langa misleading his audience with Richard Cohen’s book. Today an article from UGPulse describes the views of Victor Mukasa, speaking in protest of the recent campaign against homosexuality. Although his statements about origins may or may not be completely accurate for any or all same-sex attracted people, the political environment there does not give him much room for nuance — another casualty of the American visitation.

Let’s hope there are no more casualties.

UPDATE: An AP writer has a story here with the Health Minister Buturo saying he wants to help gays be rehabilitated.

UPDATE #2: A popular Catholic priest and Gospel singer has been outed by the anti-crusaders who hosted the conference where Don Schmierer, Caleb Brundidge and Scott Lively spoke. The priest denies the accusation.

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  • Lynn David

    I cannot find that last AP writer article, the link goes dead. Would that be Uganda’s Minister for State Ethics and Integrity, Nsaba Buturo?

    UGPulse has an article on what Buturo had to say:

    The government has threatened to take stern “action” against promoters of homosexuality and lesbianism in Uganda.

    .

    The State Minister for Ethics and Integrity, Dr. James Nsaba Buturo said today that the government is working on stern modalities to fight homosexuality especially in schools.

    .

    This follows a petition by parents under the Family Life Network NGO claiming that homosexual promoters are very active in Uganda and are luring students into the practice with cash gifts and promises to needy students from unstable or poor families.

    .

    The Executive Director of Family Life Network, Stephen Langa told journalists in Kampala that many children had been psychologically tortured and traumatized by experiences of homosexuality which the group described as unnatural and anti Christian.

    .

    Dr. Buturo says the government is going to act swiftly to stop what he calls “moral corruption” of vulnerable Ugandans, especially children into homosexuality.

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    He says the practice of same sex relationships is illegal in Uganda and unacceptable to the people of Uganda. The minister did not however specify which stern action was to be taken, given that the High Court ruled last year that all Ugandans, including homosexuals and lesbians are accorded the same rights and freedoms by Uganda’s constitution.

  • Lynn David

    Eh, delete my previous post, shouldn’t have copied it.

    .

    Here is an English translation of an Italian translation of whatever language (English or local) Buturo used:

    “Uganda is a Christian Country,” said the minister for state ethics, Nsaba Buturo, “we do not believe in the homosexuality. We love the gay and the homosexual but we hate their activity. We want to help them in the rehabilitation.”

  • jayhuck

    I’m just curious – does anyone know of anything that Alan Chambers or Exodus is doing to curb what is happening in Uganda? Am I missing something?

  • Ann

    I’m just curious – does anyone know of anything that Alan Chambers or Exodus is doing to curb what is happening in Uganda? Am I missing something?

    Jayhuck,

    I am not sure if you are missing something unless you forgot to ask yourself if you are doing anything to curb what is happening in Uganda. It is difficult to ask of others what we are unwilling to do ourselves. I know what I am doing and that is what matters to me.


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