Uganda: Caleb Lee Brundidge on the criminalization of homosexuality

During the Family Life Network conference on homosexuality in Kampala, questions were asked on a variety of topics. Criminalization came up via a question to Caleb Lee Brundidge. The conference speakers had an opportunity to address the topic via the questions asked, even the subject was not a part of their prepared remarks. Here you can hear the question and Mr. Brundidge’s response.

I am not sure what Mr. Brundidge is recommending here. He seems to laud the Ugandans for having “a standard” but notes that people are afraid to come out. This question might have caught Mr. Brundidge by surprise. His answer seems to come down on the side of criminalization if a person is “caught in the act.” However, much later, his mentor, Richard Cohen said he would not have sent Brundidge to Kampala if he understood the purposes of the conference.

Even though Brundidge notes a possible problem with criminalization, he provided inaccurate and misleading information to his audience. He could have taken a strong position against criminalization and for freedom of conscience. It seems unlikely that Richard Cohen’s letter has c0nnected with Ugandans the way the speakers did in March. I suspect some of those attending came away thinking that criminalization is an appropriate state response – and still may believe that approach is consistent with the teaching they heard from Americans at the Family Life Conference.

For all posts on the Family Life Network conference in March and the Anti-Homosexuality Bill, please click here.

Note: Don Schmierer signed the letter sent by Exodus International to President Museveni which stated opposition to criminalization.

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  • Michael Bussee

    Even though Brundidge notes a possible problem with criminalization, he provided inaccurate and misleading information to his audience. He could have taken a strong position against criminalization and for freedom of conscience.

    Couldn’t they ALL have done that? Shouldn’t they ALL have done that? They ALL gave inaccurate and misleading information. THEY were wrong in what THEY told the Uganda audience. THEY were also wrong in that THEY did not tell them.

  • Michael Bussee

    I agree with what you said back in March of 2009:

    Overall, I am surprised that an Exodus board member would go to a conference like this in a country where criminalization of homosexuality is still an issue. My impression is that Exodus had no position on such things or if there was a position it was that homosexuality should not be considered a crime. For a change, I agree with Exgaywatch that it sends the wrong message for these people to go where the agenda is not simply congruence with religious teaching but also on state intervention in private behavior.

    I think this applies to all three and that none of the men have done enough to say directly to the people of Uganda, “We were WRONG”.

  • Lynn David

    Well, the question was complex/compound, so Brundidge was trying to answer a number of questions at the same time. On the other hand, Brundidge got himself so confused that his answer was muddled, wrong, right, and overall misleading. Of course, what he wanted to say was “Uganda is anti-gay and we (Schmierer/Exodus, Brundidge/Cohen/IHF, Lively/United Homophobes of America) want to keep it that way.”

    Interesting that religion gets throroughly wrapped up in some peoples lives and then people demand that their form of religion wrap everyone else up.

    Makes me glad I’m an atheist.

  • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton Warren

    Michael: I agree

    Lynn David: Makes me glad I’m not.

  • http://aebrain.blogspot.com Zoe Brain

    Matthew 22:35-40.

    I look upon 35-38 as optional, 39-40 mandatory.

  • concerned

    Zoe,

    You cannot reach the second part in completeness without the first.


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