Ghana's administration sends mixed signals on gays

Ghana’s President has not spoken but a recent appointee seems to have taken on the role of government spokesperson. Lauretta Lamptey, a recent appointment to the Commission of Human Rights and Administrative Justice clarified the position of her office on Tuesday.

In short, the government is leaving it up to Parliament to either decriminalize homosexuality, to make the penalties stronger or leave things as they are. Lamptey says that being homosexual is not a crime but some kinds of homosexual behavior might be.

I posted on this at Religion Dispatches – the rest is over there

Paul Canning has more on GLB efforts to response to the recent anti-gay rhetoric.

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  • Maazi NCO

    Ghana’s administration sends mixed signals on gays

    Pretty much sums up what I have been saying about the current President John Atta-Mills for past few weeks. It seems he enjoys double-speaking

  • Maazi NCO

    In short, the government is leaving it up to Parliament to either decriminalize homosexuality, to make the penalties stronger or leave things as they are.

    My prediction is that status-quo ante will probably be maintained at least while John Atta-Mills is in power. As friends in Kumasi told me several weeks ago, the President has no appetite to quarrel with Western donors neither does he have the appetite to offend the deeply conservative Ghanaian people (In my experience, North Africans are the most conservative followed by West Africans then East Africans and finally Southern Africans).

    However, things could change; “status-quo ante” could be disrupted and the Ghanaian Parliament fired-up for punitive action if Western-controlled gay sex militants in Ghana become as noisy and disruptive as those here in Kampala.

  • Richard Willmer

    How’s the noisy and disruptive Martin Ssempa these days, I wonder? Any news on the old libel case?


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