Nigeria’s House of Representatives Passes Gay Ban

Nigeria’s version of Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill passed the Nigerian House of Representatives. Reports conflict over the immediate future of the bill. The AP reports that the bill goes to the President for signature, while others indicate that the bill will go to the Senate first.

According to the AP, the bill bans marriages or civil unions whether in a church or not. Any public displays of homosexuality will be punished. Penalties range from 10-14 years depending on offense. In the Muslim areas of the country, gays could face death by stoning. Human rights workers expect a court challenge.

It is difficult to say what effect the Nigerian action will have across Africa, most notably in Uganda where the Anti-Homosexuality Bill has been on the Parliament’s list of business to come for months.

Here is the text of the bill as of July, 2011.  The Senate passed essentially this version in November, 2011 and, according to the AP, the version passed by the House is the same bill.

Related articles:

Nigeria moves to criminalize same-sex unions

Senate passed version of bill

American Anti-Gay Campaign in Africa Opposes “Fictitious Sexual Rights”

 

Print Friendly

  • Richard Willmer

    I think, Warren, that the Bill is much worse that the one you post. Those who advocate for even the ‘mere decriminalization’ of consensual relations will themselves be criminalized.

    Ass assessment, and summary of the contents, of the Bill is given here: http://jurist.org/hotline/2011/12/damian-ugwu-nigerian-marriage.php

    In the draft you’ve displayed: note the ‘definition’ of ‘same gender marriage’ – i.e. the ‘catchment zone’ of this bill is much much wider than just the issue of marriage.

  • Richard Willmer

    My understanding also is that the prison terms are 10 – 14 years, depending on the ‘crime’.

  • Richard Willmer

    On reflection, I rather think that the references to ‘marriage’ (gay or otherwise) are pretty meaningless; there are no gay marriages recognized in Nigeria.

    The troubling bit has nothing to do with sexuality or marriage or anything like that.

    It is the assault on freedom of expression.

  • Richard Willmer

    I gather that the Bill would need to go back to the Senate only if what the House passed is not the same as what the Senate passed in 2011 (which did include the 10- and 14-year sentences). If the two chambers passed the same version, then the Bill goes to Goodluck (whose luck may have run out, since one hears he might not be that keen on the Bill) for promulgation (or otherwise).

    The text of the Bill (as passed by the House) is apparently in this (nauseatingly self-righteous) article: http://dailypost.com.ng/2013/05/31/nigerian-homosexuals-to-be-jailed-14-years/

    Sections 4(1) and 5(3) are pretty much straight out of Bahatiland, and are IMO the most pernicious aspects of the Bill.

    My recollection is that this is the same as what the Senate passed in November 2011.

  • Richard Willmer

    Interesting article: http://sebaspace.wordpress.com/2013/06/03/bisi-alimi-gets-it/

    I am certainly of the opinion that the ‘marriage bits’ in the Bill are meaningless; the key aspects are 4(1) and 5(3), and, while we don’t usually say such things, the label ‘Nazi’ does strike me as appropriate in their regard.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X