Abortion: The Hardest Choice

I don't walk in her shoes, so I can't describe them to you.

Abortion is a hard subject to talk about. Coming up with theoretical situations to illustrate a standpoint is usually not helpful because doing so fails to express the complexity of the decision whether or not to end a pregnancy. This decision, more often than not, comes with other major life-changing events and it is not only a medical concern, but a deeply spiritual and difficult ethical decision. By the grace of Artemis, I have never been faced with a pregnancy that I considered ending and I … [Read more...]

Epou theo: A Hellenic argument for interfaith work

Parthenon

The Delphic Maxims, as you may or may not be aware, were a set of almost 150 commandments written in the early 6th century BCE by seven wise men from all over the Greek-speaking world. They had been carved into stone and set in front of the holy Temple at Delphi and were used to teach some of the basics of the Greek language as well as to impart some wisdom to the public. I can imagine that its placement near the Temple allowed some who visited seeking wisdom could do so without needing to ask … [Read more...]

The Whole Community

KHyardsale-4

I haven't been writing all that much here lately, partly because life happens and partly because much of what I had to say was beginning to take a negative tone. I don't like to dwell on the negative because it's important to me to put things that are beautiful and positive out into the world.Being critical and bitter is easy; being genuinely positive is much harder.As our May activity, Women of Faith helped put together a yard sale to benefit Kymari House, a local non-profit that … [Read more...]

Down South Diversity

alg-tenn-mosque-jpg

The other day, I read a "you know you're a New Yorker/ Californian/Midwesterner/Southerner when..." post in my G+ stream that consisted primarily of mildly to moderately negative stereotypes. Needless to say, this is not a form of "humor" I enjoy. Not only do Southerners rarely have names like "Jim Bob" and "Billy Sue," but there is also a high degree of variation in dialect rather than a single "Southern" mode of speech. And I'm going to need y'uns to spell "y'all" correctly if you're going to … [Read more...]

The War on Christmas

Poinsettia_2

Several excellent authors have already covered the so-called "war on Christmas," but since the holiday season provides plenty of opportunity for interfaith interaction, I wanted to touch on this subject a little bit here at Wild Garden. I've been trying to figure out what, exactly, the "War on Christmas" is. From our house, this is a time of good cheer when we stick a tree in the living room and drink a ridiculous amount of hot cocoa. As I write this, the sun is hitting the tinsel just so and … [Read more...]

The Problem with Proselytization

Assimilation is not just something that happens in Star Trek.

I wrote some time back about how it is imperative for me to be courteous to those who come to my door. This is part of my upbringing as well as a moral obligation stemming from my religious convictions. By and large, I see proselytization efforts as futile and mostly harmless, but the practice has certain assumptions at its core that can lead to behaviors and attitudes that can be quite harmful to those of us in the minority. The assumptions are as follows:There is one true way. Because … [Read more...]

What to say when they come to your door

Mormons in the wild (Nicest people you'll ever meet; not a rude missionary among them).

I was struggling with what to write this week, when an interfaith encounter came to my door. The gods work in obvious and unsubtle ways. And, as a side note, I'm a day late and a dollar short in posting this week. I had a thesis defense on Monday, so I hope you will all forgive me for the delay.I'm sure a lot of you have had similar experiences and have likely even devised a method of handling the door to door religion salespeople. I've heard a number of different ways of dealing with … [Read more...]

Forgiveness and Redemption

Angulimala about to fail at murdering.

When thinking about the topic of forgiveness, I found that I had a couple of conflicting thoughts. This is one of those cases where interfaith work is internal, being that I both identify as a Hellenic Polytheist and a California Buddhist. My Buddhist self told the story of Angulimala, who was once a murderer and a thief and, upon learning stillness from the Buddha (who was to be his 1,000th murder victim), became a monk and never intentionally harmed another person again. The Buddha was willing … [Read more...]


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