Wiccan Denied Clergy Status in Virginia

Literata

[The following is a guest post from Literata Hurley. Literata is a Wiccan priestess, poet, and theaologian. Her work has appeared in several anthologies and  periodicals, including Mandragora, Queen of the Sacred Way, Anointed, Witches & Pagans, and CIRCLE Magazine. She blogs regularly for The Slacktiverse and her own site, Works of Literata. She is an ordained High Priestess of the Order of the White Moon, a women's spirituality organization. In between leading Rose Coven, reading … [Read more...]

Unleash the Hounds! (Link Roundup)

There are lots of articles and essays of interest to modern Pagans out there, sometimes more than I can write about in-depth in any given week. So The Wild Hunt must unleash the hounds in order to round them all up. Virginia’s Board of Social Services has approved a truly audacious list of new adoption rules that authorize agencies to discriminate on the basis of age, gender, political beliefs, family status, and religion. This is ostensibly to prevent same-sex couples from adopting, … [Read more...]

Virginia Pagan Wins Conservation Post in Tuesday’s Elections

Lonnie Murray

It was election night this past Tuesday, and while the media has largely focused on hot-button political issues like fetal "personhood" or collective bargaining rights, our faith communities took a quiet political step forward in Virginia. There, local Unitarian-Universalist and Pagan Lonnie Murray won a seat on the Thomas Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District (TJSWCD), a body that provides natural resource assistance for Albemarle, Fluvanna, Louisa and Nelson Counties, as well as … [Read more...]

Virginia Court Says Divination Not A Religious Practice

A screenshot of Psychic Sophie's website.

In the beginning of 2010 I reported on the case of Patricia Moore-King (aka "Psychic Sophie"), a psychic practitioner/spiritual counselor who challenged Chesterfield County's onerous zoning regulations designed to discourage tarot readers, psychics, astrologers, and other practitioners of “occult sciences” from opening up a shop. King maintains that she wasn't a "fortune teller" but engaged in a form of religious counseling, and therefore the regulations didn't apply to her. The … [Read more...]


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