Oregon Mother Arraigned in the Murder of Severely Disabled Son

Oregon Mother Arraigned in the Murder of Severely Disabled Son September 12, 2018

Last month Tashina Aleine Jordan shot and killed her seven-year-old son. After she shot and killed her son, Tashina took an overdose of prescription medications. Initially, it appeared she might not survive the overdose. However, Tashina made a complete recovery. Last week a grand jury indicted her on aggravated murder in the death of her son.

From outward appearances, Tashina was a doting mother to her son. Mason suffered multiple brain bleeds as an infant. As a result of the brain bleeds, Mason was unable to walk, bathe or dress, and used a wheelchair.

Despite neighbors and friends saying Tashina didn’t have any known mental health issues, something snapped on August 20th, 2018. Police now say that Tashina shot her son first in the head. Then she took an overdose of pills in hopes of ending her own life.

First responders arrived to find her unconsious on August 20th, 2018. They attempted numerous life-saving measures. Tashina then went to the hospital. There she fully recovered.

On August 27th, authorities arrested Tanisha. She was booked and held without bail on the charge of aggravated murder. Tanisha has not made a plea of guilt or innocence yet on the charges.

Prosecutors said they would weigh out in the next 1-2 months if they plan to seek the death penalty against Tashina. Her next scheduled court appearance is September 24, 2018.

We still have no answers on what caused this mother to snap. There have been no public statements by Tashina following the crimes.

The County District Attorney released the following statement on the case to KTVZ News out of Oregon:

“Our community mourns the loss of Mason Jordan, who by all accounts was a wonderful and loving child.  I commend the Bend Police for conducting a thorough and professional investigation in spite of the emotional trauma inherent in an investigation of this type.  I thank the medical staff at St. Charles Hospital who provided excellent care to Tashina Jordan while also accommodating the needs of the investigating officers.  And I thank the grand jurors who took their oath to heart by paying close attention to the evidence that was presented to them, even when it was painful to do so.”

Stay tuned.

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Jim Jones

    I assume that support for the disabled who aren’t wealthy is poor.

    And it’s not as if the workers who do this job are well paid.

    Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. – The New York Times

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/11/magazine/americans-jobs-poverty-homeless.html

  • Anne Fenwick

    We still have no answers on what caused this mother to snap.

    ???????????!!!!!

    I think people in her situation need an awful lot of support to pull through without snapping, let’s just say that. And if I’m understanding that she was a single mother? In a country renowned for its shitty healthcare and poor social support? In which people are easily isolated? In which it really does seem that a realistic assessment of her future and her son’s might not include much that wasn’t grueling?

  • Anne Fenwick

    It’s certainly hard to see how this woman was to escape poverty by working while necessarily paying a care worker less than she was making herself.

  • persephone

    There was a card on Postsecret where a mother described changing her son’s diaper, bathing him, feeding him, getting up every two hours at night to check on him and the machines, and that her son was 26.

    I just don’t know how you could last that long.

  • WallofSleep

    Sorry, this is completely Off Topic, but I was wondering if you’ve heard of this product KP:

    https://finalstraw.

    From what I can recall of your post on the subject of your son’s straw situation it looks like it might not fit his needs, however you might be able to reach a sympathetic ear in that start-up willing to work on a solution for your son and people like him.

  • Daffodil

    It’s painfully obvious why she snapped. I knew a couple whose son was in a wheelchair, unable to walk, feed, clothe, care for himself in any way. He could just barely talk, but was intellectually disabled as well. He would never ever live on his own. They cared for him in their home until he died of pneumonia in his early 30’s. At least they had each other to take turns caring for him. This woman was all alone and knew this would be her life for the rest of her life. Had she killed him and then tried to hide it, that would indicate a level of selfishness, but she tried to kill herself, too, which tells me that she was beyond her breaking point and just wanted both of them to be put out of their misery.

  • Because you LOVE THEM!

  • This isn’t fair to assert that just because her son had complex needs – she would kill him. My son has complex needs and I have NEVER thought of killing him ever.

  • I have not!

  • WallofSleep

    I just barely heard about it on the evening news minutes before posting it here. Maybe they’d be willing to work on some niche products for people with disabilities. Might be worth getting in touch with someone at the company.

  • WallofSleep

    I just realized I failed to copy/paste the link properly.

    https://finalstraw.com/

  • Daffodil

    I’m not suggesting everyone in this situation would, only that this kind of life is more stressful than almost any other and not everyone has the mental/emotional wherewithal to handle it. I don’t believe for second that she didn’t love him. This is obviously conjecture, but I think that if she didn’t love him, she could have killed him in a way that was less obvious and tried to hide it so she could go on to a life without the “burden”. The fact that she tried to kill herself indicates to me how desperate she was for relief. Maybe she really just wanted to kill herself, but thought he would not be taken care of without her, I don’t know. It’s really presumptuous for any of us to speculate, so I’m going to stop here.

  • epeeist

    You have to distinguish between understanding and condoning.

    I can understand why a woman in this situation might snap in these circumstances, but it doesn’t mean I condone her actions.

  • There is danger in UNDERSTANDING that she would do this because of her child’s disability. That is not a valid reason to hurt anyone. Period. When we say things like WE UNDERSTAND, we are saying to individuals with disabilities “you are so hard to take care of some people want to kill you.” we cannot utter those sentences. She should have had support and found help. That’s what a SANE and rational mother does. I have a child that is disabled and had PROFOUND medical issues. I got to a breaking point – and I didn’t hurt him. I found help. He has nursing now and I have respite. I have never laid a hand on my son – ever.

  • epeeist

    That is not a valid reason to hurt anyone.

    I didn’t say it was.

    we are saying to individuals with disabilities “you are so hard to take care of some people want to kill you.”

    That is not what is being said. What is being said is that a parent may, in extremis, simply snap and harm his or her child. Whether the child is disabled or not is irrelevant. This is not to condone such an action.

    I got to a breaking point – and I didn’t hurt him.

    One has to ask whether it is valid to generalise from your experience to that of everyone else.

  • I’m not generalizing – I’m providing an example

  • epeeist

    I’m providing an example

    You provide an example of one particular person, yourself. You do not and cannot know whether your example is applicable to everyone else.