Man Gets 160 Year Prison Sentence For Impregnating 10-year-old

Man Gets 160 Year Prison Sentence For Impregnating 10-year-old September 21, 2018

An Indiana man received a sentence of 160 years in prison for repeatedly raping and impregnating an 11-year-old girl. Nicholas Deon Thrash, 35, forcibly raped the girl starting at age 10. By the time the victim was 11, she had become pregnant. Thrash was dating the victim’s mother. The court found him guilty on 10 counts of child molestation.

According to the Washington Post, Thrash started his abuse of the girl in Georgia. He lived with the child’s mother as her live-in boyfriend. The abuse began when the girl was only eight years old.

During this time allegations of the abuse were made to the child welfare workers. Police opened an investigation after investigators located male DNA in the girl’s underwear. After they discovered the semen, they started to look for Thrash. While the police searched for him, he moved his girlfriend and the victim to Indiana.

When they arrived in Indiana, the girl alleges he raped her at least 15 times. On an afternoon when she and her mom were shopping for clothes, her mother realized the victim was pregnant. The mother bought a pregnancy test that tested positive.

Upon the positive pregnancy test, the mother took her daughter to an abortion clinic to attempt to abort the baby. The clinic denied services to the child. Outside the clinic, protestors of the clinic took the girl to get an ultrasound. After protestors confirmed the pregnancy via ultrasound, they reported the pregnancy to police.

According to the Chronicle-Tribune, a paternity test done on the baby confirmed that Thrash was the father. In the trial, Thrash said the mother took his sperm and artificially inseminated the girl. He denied he ever abused the girl. At the time of the pregnancy, the victim was only 10-years-old. She gave birth to a boy at age 11. The baby was given up for adoption.

After the sentencing, the prosecutor said Thrash must serve 85% of his sentence before he’s eligible for parole. He will need to serve 136 years in prison to meet that requirement. Thrash will die in prison.

The girl is now in protective custody. She is in a facility to help her deal with the massive trauma she faced at the hands of both Thrash and her mother. Her mother is currently facing multiple charges of aiding child molesting, neglect and assisting a criminal. Her trial is scheduled to start October 9, 2018.

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TRENDING AT PATHEOS Nonreligious
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • WallofSleep
  • Yep – this is where the death penalty should be legal for child molesting

  • WallofSleep

    I’m against the DP in general, but then again I am not the state.

  • Martin Penwald

    No. Never. I will always refuse to recognize the validity of death penalty, whatever the crime. Even if in my own personal values standards, rape is a worse crime than murder.

  • WallofSleep

    I might, in certain circumstances, if our (U.S.) criminal justice system wasn’t totally fucked.

  • This man was a monster. I just gah. I can’t

  • kaydenpat

    That poor girl. Heartbreaking. Sigh.

  • igotbanned999

    Death penalty should be abolished, and I don’t see how rape can be worse than murder (maybe if the victim is driven to suicide).

  • Anri

    No, sorry, this is incorrect.
    This man is a man, he’s a human. He’s not the bogeyman, he’s not an orc or a grue or a dragon or a demon, ’cause there’s no such things as those.
    He’s not the other.
    So long as we assume that this sort of thing isn’t done by people, by humans, that it only ever can be done by the other, we’ll never have a hope in hell of putting an end to it.

    This guy doesn’t deserve any sympathy or fellow feeling, there’s nothing about his actions that are anything other than repulsive and nightmarish. But every time we try to pretend that what he did wasn’t done by a human, we make it harder to find and stop the humans who do it.

    Sorry for the rant – it’s a pet peeve of mine.

    If this post is inappropriate, let me know and I’ll ditch it and apologize.

  • Lambchopsuey

    Okay, I have a few questions. WHY did the abortion clinic *deny* an abortion to this child who was there with her mother requesting abortion services? When I helped a minor child get an abortion with her mother there, there was no question at all – she got her abortion. Was this a *genuine* abortion clinic or one of those fake Christian fraud clinics? And who were the “protesters” who took the child for an ultrasound and then reported the situation to the police? Were the protesters anti-lying-Christian-fraudsters? Can you define these players with a little more detail? It sounds like the protesters were trying to get abortion help for the girl, but the only “abortion clinic” was run by nasty lying Christians who wouldn’t permit any abortions to occur.

  • Monster is just a way of saying he’s a horrible human

  • I had these questions too. Unfortunately the court records didn’t detail that aspect

  • Brianna LaPoint

    I agree with reinstating the death penalty. I am pretty sure christians are the ones that voted against the death penalty.

  • If death penalty can be enforced without putting INNOCENT people to death because of our justice system I would be for it. I live in a state that has never had the death penalty in my lifetime. For that I am grateful. I think the torture of living a life behind bars is far worse than dying. This way he can suffer.

  • Brianna LaPoint

    meh. i have to ask why but no matter what your answer is, i know there are people that have no remorse for what they do to people. Its too bad there are people that dont seem to comprehend that.

  • Brianna LaPoint

    Hypocracy. Society lives and breathes on hypocracy.

  • I understand it, trust me. I have just read so much about how the death penalty is enforced. And right now they don’t have drugs that are approved or work effectively. If they find something that works – sure. But I think many states are challenged to find doctors to administer drugs to kill due to the oath of a doctor to not cause any harm.

  • Anri

    Ok, fair enough.
    Thank you.

  • sure!

  • BridgetD

    I think that the death penalty should be abolished (particularly given the state of criminal justice in my country), but there are certainly fates worse than death. The years of trauma and pain inflicted on rape victims can be much worse than murder.

  • BridgetD

    I live in a state that still kills a hell of a lot of people. Every so often, you’ll hear stories of people being exonerated after already being sentenced to death row. Aside from being a pacifist, that’s why I’m so anti-death penalty.

  • igotbanned999

    But you still have a chance to live your life and even be happy afterwards.

  • I can see that – I’ve read a lot of stories of innocent people put to death.

  • Wisdom, Justice, Love

    So many unanswered questions:

    How did the mother and this guy meet?
    How long had they dated before he moved in?
    How much dating had he or she done prior to dating one another?
    What did he do for a living that he could up and move to Indiana?
    What did the mother do for a living before meeting him?
    Who was the girl’s father, and was he or any father figure ever involve in her life?
    What type of family unit of support (brothers, uncles, aunts, neighbors, “play” cousins) did the mother have in Georgia (which would have been abandoned) or Indiana (which would have been embrace)?

    In NO WAY am I excusing his behavior. This sick mass of flesh should DEFINITELY be acquainted with justice, and swiftly (@WallofSleep:disqus is a little extreme, but I get it).
    But how complicit is the mother? How eager/motivated/lonely/desperate was she to have “a man” in her life?

    I’ve seen this movie before…
    I’ve heard of stories where the bf burns a child’s clothes, given to the child by the child’s father, because the bf feels inadequate/threatened/jealous, and the mother of the child simply “laughs it off”, out of a desire to keep the bf around.
    Seriously?

  • I agree. there are SO MANY questions

  • Mitch_Haelan

    For people like this, I would be in favor of sentencing them to prolonged solitary confinement. Hell, left in a sensory deprivation tank chamber with a tube going down their throat to feed them and a catheter to remove waste. No human contact, no chance to do anything except stare into the darkness and contemplate their mistakes.

  • Hey that’s not a bad idea! Catheters are super uncomfortable

  • WallofSleep

    “WallofSleep is a little extreme, but I get it”

    Fair cop. People who prey on children bring the worst out of me.

  • me too! I get it.

  • Wisdom, Justice, Love

    Very understandable. And believe me. I do get it.
    Don’t stop posting the theme though.

    The main reason I call it a LITTLE extreme is after about 15 minutes or so, you’d be punching a fine paste where this guys face used to be. I mean, how much more can we beat that dead horse.
    But yeah, the (k)night can’t get much darker for this guy.

  • WallofSleep

    The problem (as relayed to me from a friend of a chemist who specializes in such chemicals) is that they’re using doctors to mix and administer the injections rather than chemists experienced with them.

  • WallofSleep

    Magneto, pulling one iron molecule from his blood stream at a time.

    Okay, that might be more than just a little extreme.

  • Wisdom, Justice, Love

    Nope.
    1. Fill mouth with broken glass and lemon juice.
    2. Dip a full role of paper towels in ICE water.
    3. Smack the ever-loving taste out of his mouth with the roll of paper towels.

    Rinse and repeat, repeatedly.

    Some dark sides are colder and darker than others.

  • WallofSleep

    Note to self: DO NOT piss off W,J,L. Ever.

  • Wisdom, Justice, Love

    Ha ha.
    I’m doing better. I’m going green.
    No need for car batteries and jumper cables these days.
    I better stop. People will take me seriously. It’s all “good-natured” revenge fantasy.

  • -MARK-

    Actually that should be a pharmacist job, not a chemist. The problem with these drugs is that many inmates have a high tolerance due to drug abuse and sometimes no good viens to inject the drugs. Also never ending court cases on each method of execution.

  • WallofSleep

    Nah, many (not all, mind) of the chemicals used are not the kind a pharmacist would be familiar with in the appropriate quantities. Specifically, the ones used to kill.

  • -MARK-

    Why not? They are using drugs are they not? Pharmaceuticals? Yes the don’t prescribe lethal doses. But they are experts on how drugs interact in the body, individual variations. How to undo a potential overdose. They really are well trained in medicine, if but underutilized in a retail setting.

    Chemist really don’t have training in medicine.

  • WallofSleep

    “Why not? They are using drugs are they not? Pharmaceuticals?”

    For the sleepy part, yes. For the killy part, not so much.

    EDIT: At least that is my understanding of it. I am by no means an expert on the subject.

  • -MARK-

    Using pharmaceuticals like the ones used in the death penalty. Opioids. Muscle relaxers, barbiturates, anesthesia. These are drugs used in medicine particularly in palliative care, right up to the lethal dose at times. Anything to prevent pain.

  • -MARK-

    Do chemisit kill people?

    Pharmacist don’t use drugs to kill. But they are experts on how drugs interact and how it can kill. It’s all in the six years of education that I think they get.

  • WallofSleep

    Like I said, not all of the chems used are pharmaceuticals. But your question touches on another problem: finding people who posses the expertise while lacking any moral objections to such a practice. Not as easy as it sounds.

  • -MARK-

    Actually any veterinarian is trained to put an animal ‘to sleep’

    Part of the problem besides drugs tolerance is the need to make the execution look ‘clean’ to observes.

    As far as finding people. I don’t think any medical person should be used at all. There is a long sorry history of doctors being used in a variety of unethical roles. Their roles should be healers only.

  • WallofSleep

    “Actually any veterinarian is trained to put an animal ‘to sleep’”

    Exactly. Animals, not humans. There are different body weights and tolerances to consider, as well as different toxins. For instance we can eat garlic or onions just fine, but those can kill a dog. I doubt a vet, no matter how experienced, is going to have the expertise or knowledge to put a human to sleep.

  • -MARK-

    Actually Veternarians do study a good chunk human medicine along with a common animals and then go into specieses specific differences after that.

    The treatments they give animals are for the most part, derived from human medicine. There are differences in practical effects. But those drugs that they use in execution pretty much work the same in a all the various mammals as they do on humans. Just another mammal.

    I just gave it as an example of a profession that does this. I don’t think chemist know anything professionally about medicine or how chemicals work in the human body. Unless they are doing pharmaceutical research.

    Personally I could probably come up with a dosage that would work, or methods that would work. A single large dose of a strong opioid followed by an anesthetic and then nitrogen by mask should work just fine. Don’t know if it would look peaceful.

    Not for nothing. When I get old, I am going to have a little stash available to do just the same. Just in case I am in a situation where life is too unbearable and palliative care is not enough.

  • -MARK-
  • muttpupdad

    No, go on you were just getting to the good parts s

  • Jim Jones

    The ‘system’ is making too many mistakes. Coupled with that, it is set up deliberately to favor the wealthy and well connected and the like and to disfavor the poor.

    How Golf Digest helped free a man wrongfully convicted of murder

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-thursday-edition-1.4831404/how-golf-digest-helped-free-a-man-wrongfully-convicted-of-murder-1.4831411

    When Max Adler received a tiny drawing of a golf course in the mail, his interest was piqued.

    But it was the accompanying letter that sent the Golf Digest editorial director on a six-year journey to help free artist Valentino Dixon from a New York prison.

    Adler began looking into Dixon’s case and found that the prosecution had been “horrible.”

    “I mean, they charged witnesses with perjury before the trial began because their story went against the sort of preconceived notion of the police,” he said.

    After the Golf Digest piece was published, Adler said there was a heavy push for Dixon’s case to be re-examined.

    Media coverage increased, as Adler continued to write letters advocating for Dixon.

    Finally, Georgetown University’s Prisons and Justice Initiative (PJI) took notice. The class worked with Dixon’s attorney, Donald Thompson, to have the conviction overturned.

    “It went so far beyond reasonable doubt that it’s pretty outrageous that he would have been convicted and it would have been upheld,” PJI director Marc Howard told The Associated Press.

  • Jim Jones

    So, I guess a meal of garlic and onions isn’t going to work? ‘P

  • Jim Jones

    > WHY did the abortion clinic *deny* an abortion to this child who was there with her mother requesting abortion services?

    Probably a fake ‘clinic’.

  • Jim Jones

    I bet you are 100% wrong. IME, Christians love the death penalty. Remember, a lot of them support murdering abortion doctors and even clinic workers. They’re a million miles away from Matthew 25:35-36

    “For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.”

  • Jim Jones

    In fact, worst of all is to be put in a cell and be told you will never, ever be moved. You will die there.

  • Jim Jones

    The UK has done it. Canada has done it. Canada even sentenced a 14 year old boy to death (the sentence was commuted). Later, they decided he was innocent after all.

    All it takes are crooked cops, incompetent experts, corrupt prosecutors, a senile judge or malign jurors and the system fails.

  • Freodin

    I admit that I am neither a doctor, a pharmacist or a chemist, so my understanding of these questions may be lacking.

    But I do wonder: we have managed to develop a very reliable system of anaesthetics.
    So why not simply dose (or even overdose) the person to unconsciousness… and then shoot or behead them?
    A quick and reliable method of execution and a “humane” way to do it.

    (And BTW, I am completely opposed to the death penalty. This is just me wondering about stuff.)

  • Susan

    That would be ruled unconstitutional due to the provision against ”cruel or unusual punishments”.