"I'm a Christian and I'm not Gullible"

Ref left this comment on my Rick Perry post the other day.

It contained so many questions I receive so often that I thought I’d give it some attention.

 

Behold:

I am a Christian. I am a conservative. I am neither stupid, nor gullible, nor uninformed. With that said, what I find rather odd is that the majority of athiests who are so vehement in their rejection of whatever hold they believe the Christian community has on this nation are the front runners in mankind’s intrisic ability, and, supposedly, inalienable right to believe as we see fit. Yet, there seems to be no boundary when posting one’s opinion of the stupidity of those that, for whatever reason, choose to espouse a belief in the divine. This is, in my opinion, rather ironic as a belief in some type of God is, bar far, the majority perspective. Is it that many of you see those inclined to believe in the divine as simply less intelligent than the elite minority of you that, somehow, happen to have had the restrictive veil of religion removed from their eyes and, now, see the truth? Thanks for your response.

So often I hear the Christian tell me they’re not gullible, that they are well-reasoned, etc.  I always anticipate that they’re going to go on to explain why believing in somebody rising from the dead is a reasonable conclusion, but they never do.  Just “I’m not gullible” and then leave me at taking their word for it.

Well Ref, that dog don’t hunt.  If you want me to believe you’re not gullible, you need to pony up some evidence for your position.  Got any?

As far as your intelligence, I don’t really know.  People like Isaac Newton and Blaise Pascal were pretty sharp, yet believed a very dumb thing.  So I don’t believe all Christians are stupid, but I do believe they all hold a very stupid belief.  I guess your comment will have to be the rubric by which I gauge your intellect.  Frankly, it’s not helping you in my eyes.

…what I find rather odd is that the majority of athiests who are so vehement in their rejection of whatever hold they believe the Christian community has on this nation are the front runners in mankind’s intrisic ability, and, supposedly, inalienable right to believe as we see fit.

The majority of us feel we’re the only ones who get to believe as we like?  Who the hell has ever made that argument?  Show me one atheist saying Christians can’t believe as they wish.

What we do say is that you are all wrong.  You are.  There’s no shame or guilt in saying so.  Freedom to believe as you like does not mean freedom to be free of criticism.

Yet, there seems to be no boundary when posting one’s opinion of the stupidity of those that, for whatever reason, choose to espouse a belief in the divine.

Yes, there is no boundary for this.  You spend a lot of time bemoaning how we criticize your beliefs and literally zero time defending those beliefs.  This needs to be reversed.

This is, in my opinion, rather ironic as a belief in some type of God is, bar far, the majority perspective.

It’s only ironic if you confuse telling someone they’re wrong with telling them they can’t believe what they wish, which is what you’ve done.  This is not a good way to convince me you’re intelligent.  You may respond by asking me how dare I question your intelligence when you were so polite in your comment.  If you do, I have the following responses.

1.  I’m not going to placate you because you were nice to me.  I’m not trying to be mean, but I am being honest, and honesty in this case is disparaging.

2.  Your comment was full of pointed questions that insinuated less-than-noble motivations on the part of atheists, so don’t hide behind “but I was so nice.”

And so what if it’s the majority perspective?  The majority of people on this planet thinks Christianity is false (Christians of various denominations make up about 31% of the global population).  If the majority is the arbiter of what’s true, you’re hosed.

Is it that many of you see those inclined to believe in the divine as simply less intelligent than the elite minority of you that, somehow, happen to have had the restrictive veil of religion removed from their eyes and, now, see the truth?

They certainly place a lesser premium on evidence and reason when it comes to the god question.  If anybody else came up to you and said they know somebody who walked on water a few centuries ago, you’d rightly consider them mad, yet Christians want me to act like they’re justified believing all the wonky things about Jesus.  No, sir.  The standard is the same.

You spent a whole comment asking pointed questions designed to paint atheists as elitist without merit.  You didn’t spend so much as a consonant explaining why you’re right.  Until you do, how am I supposed to respond?  “Well, I have no idea why Ref believes this silly position, but he feels he’s so put upon.  And even though I have all the reason and evidence on my side, I don’t want to come off as elitist, so I guess I can cut him some slack.”

If that’s the response you’re looking for, you can go piss up a tree.  I am so tired of Christians and other religious folk asking me to acknowledge how noble their positions are when they don’t lift a finger to defend them.  And if you think that you shouldn’t have to defend your position for we atheists to lighten up on religion, listen to Greta Christina to learn about a small percentage of the reasons we’re pissed off about power being in religious hands.

Beliefs are not some irrelevant matter of opinion.  They are the gatekeepers to our actions and our actions affect those around us, especially the actions of people in the halls of power.  The accuracy of our beliefs matters!  If you have nothing but shitty reasons for your beliefs, you are failing humanity as well as yourself.  That is why we care.

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About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.


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