Campers read my blog

Several of the campers at Camp Quest Ohio told me that they read my blog.  I guess I should tone it down on my use of the f word.

Perhaps I could replace it with ass, god damn, motherfucker, shit, or something equally colorful.

Seriously, the kids at that camp are bright enough to make a full examination of the horrors of religion and their effects on the world.  They face questions about death, morality, sexuality, and other “adult” concepts with an admirable bravery for people so young.  I watched them do it for a full week.

Reading the word “fuck” on my blog is probably not going to rob them of any part of their childhood that our society hasn’t already trampled.

  • denise

    As a parent of a camper, it’s fine. She’s heard it :D

  • Sercee

    I sincerely can’t wrap my head around the idea that we censor a word like that but not the context. I’m completely opposed to censorship, period, but why, for example, do I hear the full play of “Closer” by Nine Inch Nails on the radio but they keep blanking out the word “fuck”? People aren’t given enough credit, and their sensibilities are given too much.

    • Sercee

      Also, it’s awesome that those kids have people like you around to remind people how much credit they deserve.

  • Randomfactor

    “God damn” seems a bit problematic. Also such phrases as “sure as hell.”

  • IslandBrewer

    My oldest first heard the word “fuck” around 5. His first question was “how do you spell that?”

    I never taught him that the word was “bad”, but that certain people get really upset when they hear it. You will get in trouble at school if you say it. Grandma will be VERY angry at me if she hears you say it. I explained how people use it and why some people are offended by it. I’ve heard him say it sotto voce. He’s heard me say it.

    He’s never been in trouble for his language. He’s actually a very polite, thoughtful, well behaved kid. He’s been in trouble once for fighting (he was defending another kid from a bully, which made me proud, but still got him in trouble).

    JT, I’m quite certain that NONE of your campers first learned of the word “fuck” from your blog. I’m even more confident that they’ll learn a more appropriate context for its use from you than from other places.

    Tl,dr: Don’t worry about it.

    • Azkyroth, Former Growing Toaster Oven

      I never taught him that the word was “bad”, but that certain people get really upset when they hear it. You will get in trouble at school if you say it. Grandma will be VERY angry at me if she hears you say it. I explained how people use it and why some people are offended by it. I’ve heard him say it sotto voce. He’s heard me say it.

      I personally got a lot of mileage out of explaining to my daughter that “when there’s a reason to say those words, grownups will have already said them.” In fact, it still pretty much works.

      I recently had to explain to her that “faggot,” which a couple of preteen boys at the apartment pool were tossing around, is one of the ACTUAL words people should never say (simplifying slightly).

  • Azkyroth, Former Growing Toaster Oven

    If they’re older than about 9 they hear “fuck” at least ten times a day at recess. Why does society have its collective head up its ass about this, STILL, even now that the kids I went to school are grown?

  • http://www.decrepitoldfool.com george.w

    I can’t figure out why it’s “the F word” and it is a “bomb” that one drops. I taught my kids there are no “bad” words but there are “problem words” in that if you say them around the wrong person, they will make problems for you. In retrospect (my kids are all grown) I should have chosen “trouble” instead of problem but the idea still worked well enough.

  • https://twitter.com/#!/Erulora Erülóra Maikalambe

    My toddler hears all the “naughty” words at home. She has not repeated any yet. Not sure what I’ll do when she does, but probably not much. I figure if she doesn’t get any attention for it, she probably won’t do it much. My only regret is that my swearing tends to not be that creative, because I’d prefer to hear her to be more prosaic in her use of colorful metaphors than the average preteen.


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