Study: atheists get divorced less than deeply religious couples.

A study released by the Barna Group has revealed that deeply religious/conservative couples are more likely to get divorced:

According to a study conducted by the Barna Research Group, divorce rates are higher among “Bible-believing” Baptists and nondenominational Christians. Divorce rates are lower among the more liberal Methodists, and even lower among atheists.

The study surveyed a total of 3,854 people living in different parts of the United States and found that divorce rates were highest among conservative couples.

Ironically, the study suggests that the reason for the higher divorce rate among deeply religious couples is the social mores given to us by deeply religious people:

Christian communities are taught to “embrace surprise pregnancies as gifts from God,” and to refrain from abortion at all costs. Such communities are encouraged to marry young so they will be less likely to participate in premarital sex.

These young marriages often result in financial instability and lower education, both of which contribute to higher divorce rates.

On the other hand, secular couples tend to view marriage and divorce as personal choices. Fewer couples see the need to get married, which results in fewer divorces. Because these couples are likely to be older when they marry, notes Salon, they have fewer babies, and their babies are more likely to be planned.

And just like the more religious states tend to exhibit the same problems as more religious countries (high rates of teen pregnancy, poverty, etc.), the same holds true with divorce, according to the study:

The study also notes that people who live in the southern states — often referred to as America’s “Bible belt” — are at a higher risk of divorce than those who live in other parts of the country. People in this region often marry younger, have lower levels of education, and have household incomes below the national poverty lines.

I have found in my own relationship that stability is the result of being exactly who you are and having a partner who gives you the freedom to be exactly who you are (and loves you for it).  Religion, especially in its most fundamental form, places all manner of restrictions on what you can do, regardless of who you are or what you want.  Do you have impure thoughts?  You can’t enjoy them.  Do you find other people attractive (or even love them)?  Too bad, monogamy is the rule of the land.  Do you want to have sex or touch your partner before an arbitrary ceremony has taken place?  Nope, can’t do that either.  Do you not want children?  Sorry, that choice isn’t yours – start popping them out.

The list could go on and on.  And when you wind up in a relationship with someone who has fallen in love with, and expects you to never change from, the person you’re pretending to be (which may even be the person you want to be), this can create a strain.

Christianity especially tells us that we’re despicable without Jesus.  This is such an egregious lie as to be beneath even Ted Cruz.  You are beautiful, and your humanity is glorious.  The suppression of ourselves to satisfy a god that obviously does not exist is perhaps the greatest reason I loathe religion.


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