Number of Latinos identifying as “nones” has almost doubled since 2010.

We’re just making progress everywhere.ย  ๐Ÿ˜€

The number of Hispanic American “nones” โ€” those who say they have no particular religion or are atheist or agnostic โ€” is growing at a clip that would make GOP operatives green with envy. According to the Pew Research Center’s 2013 , 18 percent of Hispanics are not affiliated with any religion.

Put differently, almost 1 in 5 Hispanics now says he has no religious affiliation, more than the approximately 1 in 6 who (many of whom are ).

And just like everywhere else, this is more pronounced in the younger generations:

And the ranks of the Hispanic nones are growing quickly โ€” nearly doubling from 10 percent in 2010, with the most pronounced jump occurring among younger Latinos. A whopping 31 percent of those ages 18-29 say they are religiously unaffiliated, about two-thirds the number of those who say they are Catholic (45 percent).

Like nones in other racial demographics, a small number of Latino nones actually identify as atheist/agnostic (even though many/most of them are probably functionally atheist).ย  This doesn’t really worry me.ย  When I see people convert away from a religion it’s usually in steps: from fundamentalist to moderate, from moderate to liberal, from liberal to spiritual, then to agnostic, and perhaps eventually to atheist.ย  It’s a process, and I suspect it works the same way on a large scale.

One of the best parts of the article though, was the last paragraph:

So while Hispanics may not be lining up to buy the latest , the growth of the left-leaning Latino nones suggests that the Republican Party’s “Hispanic problem” may only get worse. And given , it may not be long before the real question facing the GOP is how to address its “nones problem.”

Oh how I love that the religiously unaffiliated and atheistic are becoming a block that must be politically considered.ย  :)

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About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSAโ€™s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.