Thoughts on the LOTH for Today

Posted by Frank

The Office of Readings from today continues describing the wonders of the mystery of the Incarnation. An excerpt from The Epistle of Mathetes to Diognetus is in today’s Office of Readings. This epistle dates from between 125 to 200 A.D. 

“Mathetes” is not a name, but a title meaning a disciple. Nor are scholars sure who Diognetus was. There was someone of that name who was a tutor to Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the emperor of Rome between 121–160 AD. Diognetus may have also been Claudius Diogenes, who was procurator of Alexandria around the year 200.

Regardless, the letter is fascinating as an early (if not the earliest) example of Christian Apologetics. Here is an excerpt.

No man has ever seen God or known him, but God has revealed himself to us through faith, by which alone it is possible to see him. God, the Lord and maker of all things, who created the world and set it in order, not only loved man but was also patient with him. So he has always been, and is, and will be: kind, good, free from anger, truthful; indeed, he and he alone is good.

He devised a plan, a great and wonderful plan, and shared it only with his Son. As long as he preserved this secrecy and kept his own wise counsel he seemed to be neglecting us, to have no concern for us. But when through his beloved Son he revealed and made public what he had prepared from the very beginning, he gave us all at once gifts such as we could never have dreamt of, even sight and knowledge of himself.

When God had made all his plans in consultation with his Son, he waited until a later time, allowing us to follow our own whim, to be swept along by unruly passions, to be led astray by pleasure and desire. Not that he was pleased by our sins: he only tolerated them. Not that he approved of that time of sin: he was planning this era of holiness. When we had been shown to be undeserving of life, his goodness was to make us worthy of it. When we had made it clear that we could not enter God’s kingdom by our own power, we were to be enabled to do so by the power of God.

When our wickedness had reached its culmination, it became clear that retribution was at hand in the shape of suffering and death. The time came then for God to make known his kindness and power (how immeasurable is God’s generosity and love!). He did not show hatred for us or reject us or take vengeance; instead, he was patient with us, bore with us, and in compassion took our sins upon himself; he gave his own Son as the price of our redemption, the holy one to redeem the wicked, the sinless one to redeem sinners, the just one to redeem the unjust, the incorruptible one to redeem the corruptible, the immortal one to redeem mortals. For what else could have covered our sins but his sinlessness? Where else could we, wicked and sinful as we were, have found the means of holiness except in the Son of God alone?

How wonderful a transformation, how mysterious a design, how inconceivable a blessing! The wickedness of the many is covered up in the holy One, and the holiness of One sanctifies many sinners.

The complete letter may be read here.

  • Webster Bull

    Thanks Frank,Another reason YIM Catholic is, the Church Fathers, largely ignored by most of our Protestant brethren. What a powerful thought it is for me that “Mathetes,” whoever he was, lived about as close to the death of Christ as I do to Abraham Lincoln’s. This “stuff” Mathetes wrote is not some latter-day theory “cooked up” by a wiseacring theologian. It was written by someone informed by an immediate and vibrant oral and written memory. We may mythologize Lincoln to a certain extent; we may burnish his story, making it glow a bit more than it did during his presidency. But we know pretty well what happened, and we understand what it meant. That's how I read Mathetes and other writings of the early Fathers.

  • EPG

    Thank you for posting this Frank. Webster is right, we could all use a better grounding in the writings of those who came before us in all this, especially the earliest.(Which kind of ties in to Chesterton's argument about the Tradition being the democracy of the dead).

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01819831282677092730 Frank

    @EPG and everyone: And I am thankful to the Church for developing the LOTH. A blessing without measure for my prayer life! Read all about it's roots here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liturgy_of_the_Hours


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