Who Is Jesus Christ? by Eric Sammons (A Book Review)

Yesterday I wrote about classic books in the packs and pockets of the saints and how reading them can help us too. For example, St. Francis de Sales (whose feast day is tomorrow) and his worn copy of Dom. Scupoli’s The Spiritual Combat. St. Teresa of Avila turned from reading trashy romance novels to reading books like Francisco de Osuna’s The Third Spiritual Alphabet.

Francisco himself constantly references the works of Jean Gerson, which were over 100 years old by the time he read them. I recommend Gerson to you as well.

When the saints above were picking up these volumes, however, they were written by their contemporaries. So just like them, I’m going to recommend a new book to you today: Who Is Jesus Christ? Unlocking the Mystery in the Gospel of Matthew by Eric Sammons.

Who is Eric Sammons? Eric is the director of evangelization at his parish in Gaithersburg, Maryland and is working towards his Masters degree in Theology at Franciscan University of Steubenville. He is also a husband and father of five children. Did I mention he co-founded the non-profit Little Flowers Foundation that helps Catholic families adopt special-needs children? He also blogs at The Divine Life. I like Eric because he is a baseball fan too, and a fan of the Cincinnati Reds, which was my favorite team from childhood. That and he’s obviously a disciple of Our Lord.

But enough about Eric, and on to why should you buy this book. It’s quite simple really. As I mentioned yesterday, you are in Christ the King’s Army, or are thinking about joining it. As such, you are willing to put your life on the line for His Majesty. Therefore it makes a lot of sense for you personally to get to know Him better. This slim, accessible volume, will help you do just that.

There is even a strategic and tactical reason for you to learn as much as you can about Jesus. In the Marines, leadership responsibilities are pushed down to the lowest levels from the highest. Any break in the chain of command, due to death, injury, or absence of one’s superior, does not absolve the subordinate from responsibility to act, in any situation, the way his commander would.

The mission is shared with all and known by all. In the Marines, we call this Commanders Intent. By knowing the commander better, we know how he would act if he was here. Therefore the subordinate knows how to act in his absence. We act as the commanders proxy in any situation. This means we need to have a personal understanding of the commander and that is where Eric’s book comes in. Eric has taken the Gospel of Matthew, and all of the titles of Our Lord and Savior given therein, and has addressed each one in a way that gives us a fuller understanding of who Jesus Christ is.

Reading this book is a wonderful way to get to know Our Lord better. Eric guides us by the hand by exploring our incomplete perceptions of Him first, (Man, Rabbi, Ghost(!), Carpenter’s Son) and even those of His contemporaries and of the Apostle’s (John the Baptist, Elijah, Jeremiah). After all, He did ask the question “who do the people say that I am” followed up with “and who do you say that I am?” Eric goes on to explore the roles of Jesus, the prophecies and types of Christ, and his role as a son and as the Son.

Eric takes us through each of these names, or roles, or types, in a way that is easily understandable. I have read aloud portions of this book to my children before family prayer time. I’ve had my children read chapters during “quiet time” too. I’ve read it during breaks at work when my batteries need a recharge as well.

The chapters are short, but dripping with scripture references, the works of the Church fathers, and Eric ends them with reflections and points to ponder. Eric too is a convert to Catholicism, and reflections on his conversion, and examples from his walk on the Way, are helpful to all of us as we too walk this path.

Getting to know Our King better is one of the reasons why I am Catholic. This rich book, published by the good folks at Our Sunday Visitor, will help you (and your family) do the same. Buy a copy and keep it in your, back-pack, briefcase, lunch box, or purse. You’ll be glad you did.

  • http://catechesisinthethirdmillennium.wordpress.com/ catechesisinthethirdmillennium

    Looks good. Thanks for the review!


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