“Business Insider” On The Kindara App, And How It Can Help You Kick “The Pill”

Kindara Co-founders Will Sacks and Kati Bicknell

Joe Six-Pack, here. I know how it’s all the rage to root for the artificial birth control team these days, what with the HHS Mandate promising folks “freedom” from having babies at no cost. You know, treating pregnancy like it is some kind of disease.

Not that Planned Parenthood couldn’t report some scary statistics for the number of abortions provided to women who were using the pill when they became pregnant, or anything.

I wrote a post way back when about how folks aren’t  “black boxes,” and how the whole getting pregnant process could be easily explained (but isn’t, because cooties, or something). But nobody listens to me.  And the real head scratcher is why artificial hormones are reviled in beef and dairy products (Whole Foods, anyone?), and fawned over when it comes to feeding them to our moms, sisters, and daughters.

Teach our girls and boys about female fertility cycles? That smacks of science, or something.

Weird.

But since no one listens to me (a smart move, generally), I’ll point you to the folks over at Business Insider. They ran a story the other day about an iPhone application that could help break folks reliance on the birth control pill, and use Kindara to track their fertility cycles.

Think of it as a secular version of NFP, and one that makes a whole lot of sense. Take a look,

This Couple’s App Helped 10,000 Women Get Pregnant And They Say It Can Replace Birth Control Too

Want to get pregnant? There’s an app for that … actually a few apps for that. And they are proving to be remarkably helpful.
Want to avoid pregnancy? Kindara, an iPhone app created by a husband and wife team in Boulder, Colo., promises that it can be your birth control, too, letting women get off the pill.

While it’s hard to track how many women avoided pregnancy with Kindara, in the last year alone, the app has helped 10,000 women conceive, co-founder William Sacks tells Business Insider.

Users are reporting nearly 500 pregnancies per week, he says.

Kindara pe-dates another app in this category called Glow, built by PayPal co-founder Max Levchin and launched last summer. After its first four months, Glow said it helped 1,000 women get pregnant.

Kindara was released in 2012 to do a similar thing. But, unlike Glow, its founders say this app can not only help a woman conceive, but also avoid pregnancy while allowing women to get off of hormone-based birth control like the pill, patch or ring. UPDATE: Glow contacted us to say its app can be used as birth control, too.

Women input intimate details about their bodies and Kindara tells them if they are ovulating. Have sex around that time to get pregnant. Don’t have sex around that time to avoid pregnancy.

Sacks answered a few questions about the app for us:

Read the rest of the interview over at Business Insider.

Also, check out their video below.

Kindara – Meet the Founders from Just Rite Media on Vimeo.

“I felt it brought us closer together as a couple.” Indeed. Just like Humanae Vitae teaches, and Blessed John Paul II’s Theology of the Body expands upon.  And what artificial hormonal birth control pills don’t do.

Here’s the link for the Kindara app again.


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