For Your Holiday Friday Night at the Movies: Soul Surfer

Are you ready for Summer to be over and for the kids to head back to school? Well guess what. My kids have been back in school since 3 weeks ago. Ugh! But just like the kids who don’t start school until after Labor Day, their consolation is a long weekend now.

So my daughter (I can’t believe she’s taller than my wife now!) asked if we could watch the following movie: Soul Surfer. We missed it when it was in the theaters, and I remember that the reviews for it were decent, though not smashing (“we’ll wait for the DVD”), so my wife jumped on it.

The true story of teen surfer Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm in a shark attack and courageously overcame all odds to become a champion again, through her sheer determination and unwavering faith.

What a great story that helps to put things in perspective for us. Starring Dennis Quaid (Remember The Rookie and The Right Stuff? I love that guy!) and Helen Hunt (Twister!).

Check out the trailer,

The bonus for waiting on the DVD? The 30 minute documentary The Heart of a Soul Surfer. Here’s a taste,

My kids have all finished their homework and are ready for 3 glorious days off, one last long weekend before the long haul to Thanksgiving. Who’s making the popcorn?!

The Fig Harvest Begins!

‎And Amos answered and said to Amasias:”I am not a prophet, nor am I the son of a prophet: but I am a herdsman plucking wild figs.”

Ok, so they’re cultivated in my case. Either way, here at Casa del Weathers, it’s harvest time! The storm damaged baby tree (5 years old) came through in a big way. God is good!

For Thoughts On Being a Christian by the “Chinese Chesterton”

All wisdom is from the Lord God, and hath been always with him, and is before all time. —Sirach 1:1

I came across the following thoughts in my friend John C.H. Wu’s book The Interior Carmel: The Threefold Way of Love. Author Frank Sheed called John, a Benedictine Oblate, “the Chinese Chesterton.” The following selection may help you understand why. [Read more…]

To Help Make A Movie? Why Not!

A few weeks back was the 66th anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan. About a week ago, I received a note from Ian Higgins of  Major Oak Entertainment regarding a movie his studio is making about the story of Dr. Takashi Nagai, survivor of the bombing and author of The Bells of Nagasaki.  The title for the docu-drama  film is All That Remains.

According to Ian’s note, the film has the support of

the University of Nagasaki, his grace Archbishop Joseph Mitsuaki Takami and Fr. Paul Glynn, author of the acclaimed biography on Dr. Nagai, “A Song for Nagasaki”.

Here is a synopsis of the project,

Urakami Cathedral,
August 9, 1945 

All That Remains will be a powerful docu-drama telling the remarkable story of Dr. Takashi Nagai, a survivor of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Catholic convert and dedicated peace activist. His story is a dramatic and inspiring testament to the power of faith in the most extreme of circumstances. Indeed, many have petitioned that he be made a saint, and now it seems Dr. Nagai may soon be declared “blessed” by the church, which is the first step to sainthood.

Takashi Nagai was a Japanese doctor and sceptical man of science whose passion for the pursuit of truth led him to undertake a dramatic conversion to Christianity at a time when Western religious beliefs were especially discouraged in Japan. On the 9th of August 1945, he found himself amongst the survivors of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, where this newfound faith was to be tested in the most extreme of circumstances.

With his beloved wife one of the 70,000 killed instantly, he was left with no choice but to fulfil his duty as a doctor, tending to the multitude of wounded and dying all around him, while struggling to make sense of his own loss and the responsibility he now faced for his two children.

It would be his faith that would guide him back to Atom bombed Nagasaki, and it would be this faith that would inspire him to stay there and help rebuild a city from rubble and ash.

He would dedicate the rest of his short life to promoting world peace through his work as a writer. His first book was “The Bells Of Nagasaki”, it went on to become a bestseller though out Japan, as a nation, defeated and demoralised by war, re-discovered through his words, the healing of power of love.

Dr. Takashi Nagai died in May, 1951 of Leukaemia brought on by prolonged exposure to radiation.

He left behind two children, a 10 year old son, Makoto and a 5 year old daughter, Kayano. But he also left behind a huge collection of books, articles and personal notes, addressed to his children and to God. Through these words, the spirit of Takashi Nagai continues to live, but sadly, his story is fast fading into the obscurity of forgotten history.

Here is the trailer for the film,

I don’t know about you, but this is a film I would like to see. The film version of The Bells of Nagasaki came out in the Fall of the year 1950 in the Japanese market and is due for a refresher. Guess what? We can help!

We are also offering the opportunity for other Christians to get involved and help us make this film, the people who understand the power of faith, the people who want films that hold meaning for them.

Ian has a fundraising page here. If you can, throw a few coins in the tin cup there. Who knows? Your name may even wind up in the credits. While you’re at it, go “like” their Facebook page.

UPDATE: Dr. Nagai’s Nagasaki Funeral Address.

10 Reasons Why I Won’t Publish Your Uncharitable Comments UPDATED

Another ironic sign.

“Dear Frank,

I wrote a comment on your blog and you didn’t publish it. May I ask why? I didn’t use any curse words or anything. What gives?”

Simple: it was glaringly uncharitable. Here’s a little list for you to consider if you ever posted a comment to this blog and it was never published. Call it my Top Ten reasons why your brilliant comment won’t ever see the light of day on YIMCatholic.

1. Because, they are, ahem, uncharitable. Duh! Perhaps this will help.

2. Because they do nothing to further the Kingdom of God.

3. Because they show a misanthropic mindset that flys in the face of
“I give you a new commandment: love one another, as I have loved you.”

4. Because words matter and uncharitable comments show a lack of understanding of Commander’s Intent. Oh, you don’t know the definition of that phrase? Here you go.

5. Because they are the leaven of the Pharisees, and thus a total eclipse of the Son.

6. Because they break the Golden Rule and thus suck all of the life out of the combox, therefore becoming an exercise in resuscitation of zombie narcissists. Get over yourself and “love your neighbor as yourself.”

7. Because they show a basic misunderstanding of the reason why Christ came into the world. He didn’t come just to be worshipped, but to save the world from itself. “I came so that they may have life, and have it abundantly.” He has left this mission in our admittedly flawed hands. Amazing, isn’t it?

8. Because if you can’t make your point without resorting to mind reading skills you don’t have, and tearing down the other person, then your position is very weak and cannot stand on its own merits. Therefore it ain’t worth readin’!

9. Because in my charity for you, I won’t allow you to look like an uncharitable lout. Call me crazy.

10. Because life is too short.

Diane over at Te Deum Laudamus has an upcoming series of posts you might want to consider looking at as well. Here’s a promo for the series. Have a great day.

Update: Father Barron of Word on Fire on St. Thomas Aquinas, and ad hominem attacks today vs. the intellectual tradition of the Church,

Yes, An Outdoor Mass Can Be Celebrated Properly

While much of the East Coast was being rained upon by a little nuisance named Irene, there was an outdoor Mass held under crystal clear skies at my parish. And no unorthodox horrors occurred,

Sunday morning mass at Knoxville’s All Saints Catholic Church was a little different this week. The several thousand-member congregation participated in both English and Spanish.

All Saint’s pastor, Father Michael Woods, led the Mass outside on the church lawn. His goal was to unite the members of his church into one large family.

“We have six definite communities here at All Saints because of the number of masses over the weekend, so they don’t get to see each other or know each other,” he said.

“So I cancelled all the masses on Sunday to just have one outdoor mass so we get to see the size of our community, the joy of our community.”

Here is a nice little video clip with an appearance by Father Michael,

http://c.brightcove.com/services/viewer/federated_f9?isVid=1

At Mass last Sunday, Fr. Michael assured us that it wouldn’t rain for this celebration, and as you saw in the video above, it certainly did not. In the week leading up to the Mass, Fr. Michael invited all parishioners to spend an hour in adoration before the Blessed Sacrament to pray for our parishioners and for the whole Church. Well over 1000 parishioners signed up to do just that for round the clock adoration of Our Eucharistic Lord.

Last year, before a similar event, we did the same and Fr. Michael reminded us that as a result, we were blessed with 50 Catechumens and Candidates who joined the Church through our RCIA program last year. I shared that information with you earlier this year.

For the rest of the scoop on the Mass yesterday, go here.

Update: Monsignor Pope’s thoughts on martyrdom while evangelizing.

Because Words Matter…

Words differently arranged have a different meaning, and meanings differently arranged have different effects. —Blaise Pascal

Yesterday, I shared a post about catechizing the world. That “c” word is one I had never heard of before I was Catholic. It’s a complicated sounding word that I probably could never get right during a spelling bee. But it doesn’t have to be that fancy sounding,  because all it means is “sharing the Good News” and “teaching the Faith.”

What is the power of the words we choose when trying to bring others to Christ and his Church? Do they matter? Of course they do. Especially if they are puffed up so much that they wind up blocking the Son.

H/T to Terry Fenwick for posting this on her Facebook wall.

For Thoughts from the Guide for Catechists, With a Little Help From My Friends


The next time the Easter Vigil rolls around, I will have been a Catholic 4 full years. But those of you who have followed my conversion story know that I sat in the pews with my wife, and later with my children, for close to 18 years, and that I started exploring the faith in earnest in the Fall of 2006. [Read more…]

Because Love Went to Madrid, And Its Cup Runneth Over

May it find its way through to all the corners of the world. Thanks to Marc Barnes, you can see for yourself.

Quote of the Week

No, my dear brethren, even if you could perform miracles, you will never be saved if you have not charity. Not to have charity is not to know your religion; it is to have a religion of whim, mood, and inclination. Carry on, carry on, you are only hypocrites and outcasts! Without charity, you will never see God, you will never go to heaven!

-St. John Vianney

Alas, my dear brethren, the person who has no charity goes far afield for evil! If someone does him harm, you see him examining all his actions then. He judges them. He condemns them. He turns them all to evil and is always quite certain that he is right.

—St. John Baptiste Marie Vianney, the Cure’ d’Ars