For Reasons Like Missed Raptures

Father Dwight Longenecker hits my interest in this event right on the head,

What interests me specifically about the recent high profile prediction of the Rapture is that I was brought up in a fundamentalist church where dispensationalism was the interpretative key. We had an awful lot of sermons on Bible prophecy and the ‘end times’. We were taught that the Rapture was just around the corner, and although our pastor never set a date he always taught that it was ‘just about to happen.’ Other Christian teachers may correct this misinterpretation of the Bible and correct the theological errors or show the logic to be flawed, but it is really only the 2000 year, living tradition of the Catholic Church which can put such teaching into its true and rightful perspective.


Which brings me to a larger question of private revelation and private interpretation. Mr Camping and his followers are, no doubt, a sincere group of Christian believers who have come to the real and genuine belief that Jesus will come again on May 21. They believe it so much that they have invested in an advertising campaign, given up their jobs to spread the news and they believe it is God’s will with all their heart. They are out to convince all who will hear.

Let’s pray for the followers of Harold Camping.

Read the rest of Fr. Dwight’s post here.

Father Bampfield on Private Interpretation.

Rapture + Zombie Apocalypse = Movies and Beer!

Here’s the thing. Tomorrow is the Rapture, but as Tim LaHaye’s scholarly exegesis proves (?!), Catholics are going to be “left behind.” Guess what else? It’s a rolling rapture, see, because God honors our man-made time zones. Didn’t know that, didja!

I betcha also didn’t know that the Zombie Apocalypse comes right on the heels of the Rapture. Hmm? That’s theology I’m makin’ up as I go. So pay attention, because the rapture and zombies go together like peas & carrots.

It might be a good time to consider what kind of car you would like to drive, for example.

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Or what kind of house you want to live in, you know, for the next five months(if you don’t get eaten… just sayin’!). Or is it a thousand years? Whatever.

Have you signed up for the Post-Rapture Looting Party yet? You’ll also want to check-in with Julie Davis over at Happy Catholic too, because her’s is the one-stop shop for Catholics looking for zombie information. And the Crescat has a very smart, and short post-Rapture looting list too. With what she’ll be picking up, everything else will come easy.

Since the end is nigh you will need some quickie training. There is no time to complete a Learning Annex course people, so you’ll need to opt for the next best thing…movies!

First, it is critical that you watch Demi Moore in The Seventh Sign. Whatsat? A prediction for a February end? That’s just a rounding error. Don’t be fooled!

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And then back that training film up by watching Shawn of the Dead. Don’t gimme any lip about appropriateness either, because the end is nigh! Semper Paratus.

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Which brings us to beer. The deal is you may not a) find your favorite brand in Heaven; b) find your favorite brand being made anymore; ergo c) you need to have some of your favorite beers tonight before it is all over. Especially when you consider the possibility of no ice to make beer cold any longer in the future. The horror! But Mark Shea may have a solution.

And h/t to Father Scott Hurd and his Friday quote of the day, from St. Bridgid of Ireland (c 450-525),

I would like a great lake of beer for the King of the kings; I would like the people of heaven to be drinking it through time eternal.

Hear, hear! St. Bridgid, pray for us!

p.s. I just added a searchable Bible link in the left-hand sidebar. Search for the word rapture and see what comes up. Wither Sola Scriptura?

Update: Sadly, this story isn’t from the Onion. Sigh. Tell it Mark.

Update II: Take a few moments to run this flowchart to see how likely you’ll be “left behind.”

For Stuff Non-Catholics Say About the Church Like This

No, this isn’t  a photograph of Karl Marx. That’s Walter Bagehot, former editor of the Economist and a fellow who could write his fanny off. I stumbled upon what follows while tracking down a quote attributed to Blaise Pascal. I’ve become something of an unbeliever in the attributions for quotes that can so easily be found on the internet these days. I want to see the footnotes, or the original text nowadays.

So I was snooping around the electronic shelves of Google Books and found the quote, “All human evil comes from a single cause, man’s inability to sit still in a room,” buried in an article written by Bagehot that was published in an astonishing place.

Would you believe a literary journal of sorts published monthly by the Traveler’s Insurance Company of Hartford Connecticut, Circa 1887? I kid you not.

The piece where Blaise’s quote (from thought #139) was used by Bagehot (how do you pronounce that name!) in a selection entitled Thoughtless Activity, the Curse of Society. Some things never change, do they? The article was taken from a chapter in Bagehot’s book of essays Physics and Politics. And though it was a good article, I was mainly bowled over by the idea that a for-profit insurance company even bothered to publish poetry and essay’s alongside their annual financial and mortality tables. What would Sandy Weill have thought? Fire that guy and hire another actuary! Click on this title line and have a look.

Poking around for more on Bagehot, it seems that he may have been fond of the Catholic Church for a time, early in his career, you know, before more important things took up his time. In his Literary Studies, published several years after his death, his biographer Richard Holt Hutton had this to say about him,

I have no doubt that for seven or eight years of his life the Roman Catholic Church had a great fascination for his imagination, though I do not think that he was ever at all near conversion. He was intimate with all Dr. Newman’s writings. And of these the Oxford sermons, and the poems in the Lyra Apostolica afterwards separately published—partly, I believe, on account of the high estimate of them which Bagehot had himself expressed—were always his special favorites.

Perhaps Bagehot’s brush with Rome was a near-miss, but he certainly wrote favorably of her from France here,

Walter Bagehot on The Catholic Church, from his essay The Coup d’Etat of 1851

I do not know that I can exhibit the way these qualities of the French character operate on their opinions better than by telling you how the Roman Catholic Church deals with them. I have rather attended to it since I came here. It gives sermons almost an interest, their being in French, and to those curious in intellectual matters, it is worth observing. In other times, and even now in out-of-the-way Spain , I suppose it may be true that the Catholic Church has been opposed to inquiry and reasoning. But it is not so now and here.

Loudly from the pens of a hundred writers, from the tongues of a thousand pulpits, in every note of thrilling scorn and exulting derision, she proclaims the contrary. Be she Christ’s workman or Antichrist’s, she knows her work too well.

“Reason, reason, reason!” exclaims she to the philosophers of this world. “Put in practice what you teach if you would have others believe it. Be consistent. Do not prate to us of private judgment, when you are but yourselves repeating what you heard in the nursery, ill-mumbled remnants of a Catholic tradition. No; exemplify what you command; inquire and make search. Seek, and we warn you that ye will never find, yet do as ye will. Shut yourselves up in a room, make your mind a blank, go down (as you speak) into the depth of your consciousness, scrutinize the mental structure, inquire for the elements of belief,— spend years, your best years, in the occupation,—and at length, when your eyes are dim, and your brain hot, and your hands unsteady, then reckon what you have gained.”

“See if you cannot count on your fingers the certainties you have reached; reflect which of them you doubted yesterday, which you may disbelieve tomorrow; or rather, make haste—assume at random some essential credenda,—write down your inevitable postulates, enumerate your necessary axioms, toil on, toil on, spin your spider’s web, adore your own soul, or if ye prefer it, choose some German nostrum; try an intellectual intuition, or the pure reason, or the intelligible ideas, or the mesmeric clairvoyance, and when so, or somehow, you have attained your results, try them on mankind.”

“Don’t go out into the byways and hedges; it is unnecessary. Ring a bell, call in the servants, give them a course of lectures, cite Aristotle, review Descartes, panegyrize Plato, and see if the bonne will understand you. It is you that say Vox populi, vox Dei. You see the people reject you.”

“Or, suppose you succeed,—what you call succeeding. Your books are read; for three weeks or even a season you are the idol of the salons. Your hard words are on the lips of women; then a change comes—a new actress appears at the Theatre Francais or the Opera; her charms eclipse your theories; or a great catastrophe occurs; political liberty, it is said, is annihilated. Il fauti se faire mouchard, is the observation of scoffers. Anyhow you are forgotten. Fifty years may be the gestation of a philosophy, not three its life. Before long, before you go to your grave, your six disciples leave you for some newer master, or to set up for themselves.”

“The poorest priest in the remotest region of the Basses-Alpes has more power over men’s souls than human cultivation. His ill-mouthed Masses move women’s souls—can you? Ye scoff at Jupiter, yet he at least was believed in, you never have been. Idol for idol, the dethroned is better than the unthroned. No, if you would reason, if you would teach, if you would speculate,— come to us.”

“We have our premises ready; years upon years before you were born, intellects whom the best of you delight to magnify, toiled to systematize the creed of ages. Years upon years after you are dead, better heads than yours will find new matter there to define, to divide, to arrange. Consider the hundred volumes of Aquinas. Which of you desire a higher life than that;—to deduce, to subtilize, discriminate, systematize, and decide the highest truth, and to be believed? Yet such was his luck, his enjoyment. He was what you would be. No, no, eredite, credite. Ours is the life of speculation. The cloister is the home for the student. Philosophy is stationary, Catholicism progressive. You call. We are heard,”etc.

So speaks each preacher, according to his ability. And when the dust and noise of present controversies have passed away, and, in the interior of the night, some grave historian writes out the tale of half-forgotten times, let him not forget to observe that, profoundly as the mediaeval Church subdued the superstitious cravings of a painful and barbarous age, in after-years she dealt more discerningly still with the feverish excitement, the feeble vanities, and the dogmatic impatience of an overintellectual generation.

You’ll find Bagehot’s report from France on the electronic stacks of the YIMCatholic Bookshelf.

To Introduce Blaise Pascal to Stephen Hawking? Why Not!

All over the news we read (and hear) that Stephen Hawking says Heaven is “a fairy tale story for people that are afraid of the dark.” The darkness of death that is. By the way, this isn’t some new stance of his, in case you missed the interview he did with Charlie Rose back in 2008.

It’s ironic that in that clip he mentions there not being much room for miracles because the first time I mentioned Hawking in a post, it was the one I wrote about St. Joseph of Cupertino. I reckon he figures all the miracles documented by the Church are just fairy stories though. No matter.

You see, I have a soft spot in my heart for Stephen Hawking. [Read more...]

For Abusive Ad Hominem Attacks…Not!

I’ve mentioned in passing that for my day job, I work in an archive. What Fr. Barron relates below about the documents, and hard to read handwriting, etc., reflects a wonderful experience that I have daily at my workplace. Sharing documents with folks as they do family and historical research is an intangible benefit of working in an archive as well.

Did I mention that I also get heaping helpings of silence and solitude at work too? It is a long way from the noise I endured on the flight line and the gun line when I was a Marine. And it’s a long way from the controlled chaos of a trucking fleet’s dispatchers office when I was a logistics manager too.

But none of that is the reason why I am sharing this video of Father Barron’s that I saw posted over at Aggie Catholic (thanks Marcel!). The most important part of the video that helps explain Why I Am Catholic kicks in towards the end of the clip below.

I mentioned in a post recently that I have become increasingly fond of the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas. Full credit for pointing me in this direction goes to Jacques Maritian’s The Peasant of the Garonne, which I picked up in a used book sale recently.

There is another reason to share this clip now though, and it has to do with some of the comments Allison’s post on the movie Bridesmaids generated, most of which were never published. Why? Because they were exactly the shallow stuff that Fr. Barron describes starting at the 4:00 minute mark below. Have a look,

Ad hominem attacks…emotional responses driven by anger…Aquinas read everybody, heretics, Islamic scholars, Jewish rabbi’s, etc. It’s like I said in the Bridesmaids post commbox (forgive me for quoting myself),

to ignore the secular culture, and turn away from it, and in the process calumniate it, is not what Christ did. To do so would be to ignore the huge field of souls whom Our Lord came to save. To attempt to save them is hard work. Work in which we need to roll our sleeves up in order to do properly.

St. Thomas rolled up his sleeves, for sure. So must we.

P.S. For those of you who are new to our blog, or just stopping by for the first time, you’ll find helpful hints for acceptable commbox etiquette in the righthand sidebar, courtesy of St. Paul.

Jesus Goes Mainstream, Classical Music Edition

Over the last several weeks here on Music for Mondays, I’ve been exploring Jesus in mainstream culture through music. So far I’ve covered pop hits from the 1960′s and 70′s, as well as the 1980′s up through the early 2000′s. Last week I took you back to the times of Spain shortly after the Protestant Reformation.

Yes, I’m zig-zagging all over the timeline. For this week, I’m moving forward a bit starting in 1723 with pieces by Bach, then to the mid 1700′s with Handel (that’s him in the portrait above) and ending in 1825 with something by Franz Schubert.

First up is a selection that I always remember fondly because my wife chose it for our wedding. What, you too? Ain’t it grand?

Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring, J.S. Bach. Performed to a standing ovation of proud parents and admirers, kids from the Joven Orquesta del Club Argentino do Bach’s piece justice here,

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St. John’s Passion, J.S. Bach (1724). Performed by The Chamber Orchestra of Kazan State Conservatoire. You know what is neat about this performance from Russia? It’s so well done, and since the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima was last Friday, what better than to hear classical Jesus music from Russia? Thank God folks are able to worship there again! And play music like this too.

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St. Matthew’s Passion, J.S. Bach (1727). Bach also wrote a Passion from the gospel of Matthew. Possibly the gospels of Mark and Luke as well. This selection is performed by the Brandenburg Concerto with tenor Martyn Hill. I love the oboe in this piece, don’t you?

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Behold the Lamb of God, George Frideric Handel. This is performed by The London Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus from Handel’s “Messiah.” Handel wrote this in 1741, and revised it in 1754. FYI, Handel is buried in Westminster Abbey and has a feast day on the Episcopal Church calender.

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And the Glory of the Lord, George Frideric Handel. Also from “Messiah,” this time performed by the Bow Valley Chorus, from Alberta, Canada.

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Ave Maria, Franz Schubert This was played at my wedding too (I married a Catholic girl, remember?). From Schubert’s Lady in the Lake, based on poems by Sir Walter Scott, this is the prayer of the character Ellen Douglas, sung to Our Lord’s (and our) Mother. Led by violinist Joshua Bell, this is the Verbier Fesitval Chamber Orchestra, with guest Angelika Kirchschlager as the mezzo soprano. Bravo!

That’s about all the time we have for today. I promise more for next Monday. Ciao!

For Your Funny Friday Night at the Movies

Good news! Blogger has gotten over it’s flu bug and Allison and I are able to share blog posts with you again. But guess what? Jimmy crack corn and I don’t care!

That’s right, it’s Friday night and all day tomorrow will be spent at soccer fields and baseball diamonds (if it stays dry enough). Which means it’s time for some mindless entertainment that actually is kind of mindful. Galaxy Quest!

This film came out back in 1999 and is a parody of the original Star Trek series.

If you haven’t seen it, you should. It’s funny. It’s clever. It’s got hilarious spoofs of Trekkie-like stuff, and a great cast that includes Tim Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Tony Shalhoub and Sam Rockwell. And did I mention Alan Rickman? Even the USCCB Film Office approves.

My favorite character is the one who provides plucky comic relief, which is almost everybody, and just what the doctor ordered. Have a look,

See? Unemployment, doubt, redemption, existential angst, heroics, space travel, comedy. Have fun with it.

Thanks to Tomás Luis de Victoria: Singer, Composer, Priest

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been sharing musical selections from contemporary culture that are Christocentric. This week I wanted to take that same theme, but apply it to a much earlier era. While attempting to do so, I stumbled upon the works of Tomás Luis de Victoria.

Now, if I was from Spain, I would probably have learned of de Victoria in grammer school. I’m not from Spain, but I’m a Catholic now, see, so Christ’s whole world is open to me. Call it Jesus’s Big Back Yard, and come along with me to learn about one of our neighbors.

I found an article about de Victoria in the on-line version of Gramophone, a publication out of the U.K. that purports to be “the world’s authority on classical music since 1923.” The author, Edward Breen (who packs enough musical/intellectual bonafides to fill a barn) writes,

Born into a large and influential family near Ávila in 1548, Victoria died in Madrid on August 20, 1611. As a choirboy in Ávila Cathedral he studied with the leading Spanish composers of his time, yet this great Spanish renaissance composer was to be active in Italy for an important part of his life. In the mid 1560s he was sent to the Jesuit Collegio Germanco (a seminary founded in response to the spread of Lutheranism) in Rome.

Avila? Where have I heard of that place before?

Enrolled as a singer, Victoria would have lived alongside English, Spanish and Italian boarders as well as those in training for the German missionary priesthood. In the period leading up to his first publication of motets (1572) it is most likely that Victoria knew Palestrina  (who at the time was maestro di cappella at the Seminario Romano) and may even have been taught by him. Certainly modern commentators feel that Victoria was the first Iberian composer fully to master Palestrina’s style. His work as a singer and organist in Rome lead to a teaching post at the Collegio Germanico and eventually to the priesthood after his wife’s death in 1577.

The “eventually to the priesthood after his wife’s death,” is the part that really woke me up. How many times have you heard that folks who become priests, or immerse themselves in the faith, just can’t cut the mustard in the arts? Or in the sciences, for that matter? But sticking to the musical arts, here is a guy who was perhaps a model for Fr. Antonio Vivaldi, a composer you may have heard of, to look up to and perhaps follow in his footsteps.

How important is this de Victoria guy anyway? As the Catholic Encyclopedia reference on Passion Music tells it, he is important enough for the experts to Italianize his name because,

Probably the most important musical interpretations of (the Passion) text are the two by Tomas Luis da Vittoria (1540-1613). Vittoria, retains the plain-chant melodies for single persons and makes them serve, after the manner of Obrecht, as canti fermi in the ensemble. The value of these works is proved by the fact that for more than three hundred years they have formed part of the repertory of the Sistine Chapel choir for Holy Week.

Make that 400 years now. I found another citation on Fr. Tomás where I least expected it. Would you believe Absolute Astronomy? That’s where I learned this about the guy I’d never heard of,

is the most significant composer of the Counter-Reformation in Spain, and one of the best-regarded composers of sacred music in the late Renaissance, a genre to which he devoted himself exclusively. Victoria’s music reflected his intricate personality. In his music, the passion of Spanish mysticism and religion is expressed. Victoria was praised by Padre Martini for his melodic phrases and his joyful inventions. His works have undergone a revival in the 20th century, with numerous recent recordings. Many commentators hear in his music a mystical intensity and direct emotional appeal, qualities considered by some to be lacking in the arguably more rhythmically and harmonically placid music of Palestrina.

Calm down though and remember who is writing this post. Like I said when I wrote about Fr. Vivaldi, I’m no music scholar; I only know what I like. So let’s have a listen to Fr. Tomás’ work and see what all the fuss is about.

Vox Coelestis, O Magnum Mysterium. All I can say is Alleleuia indeed! Here is the English translation,

O great mystery,
and wonderful sacrament,
that animals should see the new-born Lord,
lying in a manger!
Blessed is the Virgin whose womb
was worthy to bear
Christ the Lord.
Alleluia!

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Tallis Scholars First Lamentation for Maundy Thursday.

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Taedet animam meam. This is taken for the Book of Job (10:1-7) Get out your Bible and read along.

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Westminster Cathedral Choir, ‘Communio’ from Requiem

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Matritum Cantat Choir, Tenebrae factae sunt.

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Well, what do you think? Would you believe there are nine pages worth of videos of his works over on You Tube? You can learn more about Fr. Tomás in Grove’s Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Meanwhile, I need to get cracking on learning more about this fellow named Palestrina.

Gone Prayin’

Joe Six-Pack, USMC has been hot and heavy on the Catholic Blogger beaten zone for a while now. A still, small, voice is calling to me now. It’s telling me to take a rest for a bit, and spend some time in communion and prayer with Our Triune God.

It’s sort of like this…

Because Catholics Can Dig Science

I enjoy stories like this one about experiments on Einstein’s theories. Gravity Probe- B, launched into space in 2004? You don’t remember that either?

Faith and reason are compatible, see. Thankfully there are rocket-scientists that get the funding to study warping of space and time. Neat! Especially when you consider that the idea to do these types of experiments came about 40 years ago, you know, when computers were still the size of large rooms.

Here’s an excerpt from the BBC story below,

The satellite’s observations show the massive body of the Earth is very subtly warping space and time, and even pulling them around with it.

Scientists were able to see these effects by studying the behaviour of four perfectly engineered spinning balls carried inside the probe.

The results will be published online in the journal Physical Review Letters.

They are significant because they underline once again the genius of the great German-born scientist, but also because they provide more refined tools to understand the physics that drives the cosmos.

On a more human level, the findings represent the culmination of an extraordinary odyssey for the leading lights of the mission, some of whom have dedicated more than five decades to the quest.

These include Francis Everitt, the mission’s principal investigator at Stanford University – a researcher who was there at the inception of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) idea in the late 1950s.

Like I said earlier. Neat! Read the rest here.


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