A Sonnet on the Feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary

The Heart of Mary, by Sheldon Vanauken (1914-1996).

Dear sister, I was not divine,
The angel left me woman as before,
And when, like flame beneath my heart, I bore
The Son, I was vestal and the shrine.

My arms held Heaven at my breast—not wine
But milk made blood, in which no mothering doubt
Prefigured patterns of the pouring out,
O Lamb! to stain the world incarnadine.

The Magi saw a crown that lay ahead,
But not the bitter glory of the reign;
They called him King and knelt among the kine.
I pondered in my heart what they said,
Yet could not see the bloody cup of pain.
I was but woman—though my God was mine.

Religious Liberty: It’s Not Just a Christian Thing

Pretty soon, the Supreme Court will hand down their verdict on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. This decision, and how it affects the HHS Mandate, has been discussed early, and often, in this space. Something that hasn’t been discussed here much is that other religions have lined up against the mandate as well. Not that you would have seen this reported in the mainstream media outlets. [Read more...]

Goethe Suggests a Blog Post. Who Am I to Say No?

‎One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words. – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Good advice, that. I wonder what sort of blogger Goethe would have made? He and I are like minded this morning, because there has been a song playing in my head, I just read something that I want to share with you, and I love fine pictures, even when I stumble often when it comes to speaking reasonable words. [Read more...]

On the HHS Mandate, We’re Approaching the Line of Departure

Crossing the LD, the old fashioned way…

Currently, the bulk of our forces are  still in the Assembly Area, marshalling troops, building logistics trains, and communication networks, etc.  The dozen lawsuits that were launched a few weeks ago? Probes, really, looking for areas of strength and weakness. They crossed the line of departure a few weeks back as a reconnaissance-in-force.  Over at NRO Online, Mark L. Rienzi gives a recap of what we know so far.

Basically, it’s the tale of a media blackout, which we are all familiar with, [Read more...]

Thoughts on the Role of the Laity on this Feast of St. Joan of Arc UPDATED

And so we leave Eastertide behind.  Before we move on into “Ordinary Time”, recall the events of Holy Week with me. During that week, way back in the year 33 AD, the forces of human justice, lobbied aggressively by the interested parties of the Pharisees and Sadducees, convinced the Roman procurator, Pontius Pilate, to sentence Jesus to death on a cross. And though the whole mess was a tragic setup, it was all done officially and legally.

I can think of many things today that are both official and legal and still very tragic. Here’s an example. A friend of mine who is serving in the Army in Afghanistan sent me this message recently: [Read more...]

The Dozen Lawsuits Filed Today Garnered all of 15 Seconds on CBS News. We Shall Overcome.

Calvin and Hobbes are at it again, making great points in less than 10 seconds.

Thinking along these lines then, I can’t remember the last time I actually watched the evening news. Too many ads from pharmaceutical companies and not enough real news as I recall. But tonight, what with the news that 40+ Catholic organizations sued the government by simultaneously filing a dozen lawsuits across the country, I decided to take a look, and realized pretty quickly that I’m never going to get back that half hour of my life.

I didn’t bother with CNN, or Fox, but I informally surveyed what used to be the Big Three, ABC, CBS, and NBC. Of those three networks, only CBS mentioned the story at all. Deep into the program, ’round about the 25 minute mark, Scott Pelley spent 10 to 15 seconds on the story, er blurb. ABC and NBC? Nothing at all. Nada, zilch, zippo.

Checking their websites, NBC has nothing on the story at all. [Read more...]

What the Most Interesting Man In the World Says…

Amen. That is all (H/T Southern Fried Catholicism).

General Patton’s Thoughts on the Power of Prayer

 

My youngest son has a Living Wax Museum assignment due for his 5th grade class tomorrow. He decided that he would be General George S. Patton, Jr. He’s been working on learning all he can about Patton, but what follows was in none of the books he checked out. I first shared it on the blog back on Jan 20, 2011. What did General Patton think when it came to the subject of prayer? Plenty. So here is the story again, from the archives… [Read more...]

Jazz for Jesus: Selections from Duke Ellington’s Sacred Concerts

I’m not the first to bring folks attention to the small “c” catholicity of Jazz. Hopefully, I won’t be the last. There may even be a big “C” version of it, which I will spotlight in future Music for Mondays posts over the next few weeks.

For this weeks MfM post though, I want to give you a taste of what Duke Ellington proclaimed to be “the most important thing I’ve done.” He composed and arranged three volumes of what he called “sacred concert music” and he performed, recorded, and released them as albums in 1965, 1968, and 1973. I reckon the Lord called him to share His story thorough the Duke’s musical talents before calling him home in 1974. [Read more...]

Irony Alert: President Obama’s Proclamation for National Day of Prayer

Forwarded with pleasure, because it is the kind of prayer request that I can get behind. Ironic highlight in bold is mine.

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release May 01, 2012
Presidential Proclamation — National Day of Prayer, 2012

NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER, 2012
- – - – - – -
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION

Prayer has always been a part of the American story, and today countless Americans rely on prayer for comfort, direction, and strength, praying not only for themselves, but for their communities, their country, and the world. [Read more...]


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