The Problem With the “Status Quo” in the Holy Places

Is summed up nicely by St. John in his first letter.

Beloved: The way we may be sure that we know Jesus is to keep his commandments. Whoever says, “I know him,” but does not keep his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him. But whoever keeps his word, the love of God is truly perfected in him. This is the way we may know that we are in union with him: whoever claims to abide in him ought to walk just as he walked. [Read more...]

Gone Readin’ About the History of the “Holy Places”

I have to admit to you, dear reader, that I am ignorant about much regarding the way “things” are. The world is a very complex place, and this is mostly through our own, dare I say it, grievous faults. And I also need to let you know that the semi-annual fracus in the Holy Places, like the one I shared with you yesterday, both sadden me and excite my interest in learning how they came about. [Read more...]

Fifty One Weeks From Now…

Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey will be in the theaters. Here’s the first trailer, courtesy of the folks at Collider.com. [Read more...]

Because Of “A Charlie Brown Christmas”

A reflection for December 9, 2009 from The Little Blue Book: Advent & Christmas Seasons 2009-2010. I have no idea who wrote it, but after yesterday’s Gospel reading,  it hits the mark.

“I said if I were going to do a Christmas show, we have to use the passage from St. Luke (about the birth of Christ).”—Charles Schultz, creator of the “Peanuts” comic strip

On this day (December 9) in 1965 (I was two years old!) the classic “A Charlie Brown Christmas” premiered on TV. It was based on the infancy narrative of St. Luke. In the plot, Charlie Brown tries to find the true meaning of Christmas. Linus recounts the story of the birth of Jesus.

The program won an Emmy and a Peabody Award, and led to more than thirty additional Peanuts TV specials. [Read more...]

A Few Thoughts on the Political Dimension And Some Homework

The gospel precept of charity enlightens Christians as to the deepest meaning of political life.

Lately, I’ve been “working out my salvation with fear and trembling.”  I’ve also been exploring the task of a Catholic layman in the political order. As I said in a previous post, politics generally isn’t my bag. It takes a lot of time, and basically leaves me unfulfilled. Surely I’m not alone in this regard. [Read more...]

This Novel By Johnny Cash Helped Me Become Catholic


Johnny Cash and Jesus Christ share the initials “J.C.” Johnny Cash is an adopted son of my home state of Tennessee. Johnny Cash wrote a novel called Man in White, which I read as I began my journey to the Catholic Church. It is the story of the conversion of St. Paul, and it was so good that I couldn’t believe Johnny Cash wrote it. [Read more...]

Lines on Pride from Alexander Pope’s An Essay On Man

Often times cataclysmic events leave us at a loss. We have feelings and thoughts but struggle to put them into words. Some have been blessed with the gift of the poetic art. These painters of images with words serve to bring the ineffable into focus in our minds. [Read more...]

Because Natural Law is Catholic

I’m going to have to borrow a line from U2‘s Bono and say, “Am I buggin’ you? I don’t mean to bug ya,” as the Edge’s guitar solo rises to a crescendo. I’m talking about my last few posts, which uncharacteristically have touched on politics and things political. [Read more...]

For The Road Of Joy

What follows is an excerpt from Kenelm Henry Digby’s Compitum: or, The Meeting of the Ways at the Catholic Church, published in 1869. Reading books like this is just another example of why I am Catholic. [Read more...]

The New Mass Translation? The Marines In WWII Had That.

Well, it’s pretty close, from what I can tell. And it makes a handy little pocket guide for the changes coming upon us when the New Translation kicks in this first Sunday of Advent. I didn’t have to invent the Flux Capacitor to find out about it either.

Caveat emptor: the language is more along the lines of what is found in the Douay-Rheims translation of the Bible. There are Thee’s, Thy’s, and Thou’s, rather than the more modern version that is on the handy cards you’ll probably be consulting in your parish pews. [Read more...]


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