Abraham Lincoln on the Importance of Freedom of Conscience and Religious Liberty

Everyone knows how easy it is in the age of the internet to cobble together a saying that meshes with the popular mood of the times, and then attribute it to a giant of philosophy, art, or politics. Often times these alleged quotes seem too good to be true. And after a little cursory check, you know, actually looking for a reference that verifies said quote, you come up empty, and toss it in the trash.

This practice is so prevalent that the following quote “attributed” to Abraham Lincoln has become a joke all it’s own, [Read more...]

Brad Miner Saw “For Greater Glory” This Weekend, and A Book Recommendation Too UPDATED

His review confirms my decision (it’s just one man’s opinion, take it or leave it) to not go see the film at theater prices, even though I honor the sacrifices of those who fought, died, or were martyrd during the dark days of La Cristiada. Here’s the meat and potatoes of his review, [Read more...]

With the HHS Mandate, Belloc’s Heresy “The Modern Phase” Has Arrived UPDATED

Image Credit: Ted Schluenderfritz.

A couple of years ago, when I was boring folks with YIMCatholic Book Club posts, we tackled Hilaire Belloc’s The Great Heresies. We started it around the time school was out in the Summer of 2010, beginning with the Introduction. We followed along for six weeks as Belloc made his way through all the big heresies you’ve heard of, but didn’t know diddly squat about. First, we learned the plan of the book, and then we dug into the following heresies in succession: Arianism; Islam; Albegensianism; and Protestantism. And what was the last selection? Funny you should ask. [Read more...]

Because of Natural Law and Politics

One of the early agreements Webster Bull and I had when he invited me aboard the good ship YIMCatholic was that “we don’t do politics” here. And for the most part that is a wise way to go. There are, after all, a myriad of ways to elucidate why I am Catholic without making politics the lynchpin of the reason. Bill Watterson’s characters Calvin and Hobbes get it about right, don’t they? [Read more...]

Christopher Walken Reads Us “Where the Wild Things Are”

 

Because everything is a little better with Christopher Walken’s take on it, don’t you agree? So as we bid goodbye to Maurice Sendak today, have a listen to the classic one more time, with a Walken-like rumpus. No additional  cowbell required.

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Goodbye Mr. Sendak. Thanks for the memories.

Because Blaise Pascal Knew The Art of Risk Management and the Importance of Consequences


The late economic historian, and former financier Peter Bernstein explains this fact well in an article published in the New York Times during the early innings of the tumult of the U.S. debt crisis. Bernstein authored a half dozen classics, among them Against the Gods, the Remarkable Story of Risk, which was published in 1996.

It was in that book that I became reaquainted with Blaise Pascal, [Read more...]

Democrat Opposition to Obamacare and St. Thomas Aquinas? There may be a link spelled F.R.E.E.D.O.M.

Well, would you believe Representative Barney Frank (D-Mass.) has misgivings for one? Of course, he’s not running for re-election so his admission doesn’t do much good except as a possible gauge of his colleagues thoughts. Same thing for retiring Representative Brad Miller (D-N.C.) and Senator James Webb (D- Virginia), who announced last year that he will not seek re-election.

Julian Pecquet and Sam Baker over at the political blog, The Hill, have the story, [Read more...]

The Logical Vegetarian (A Few Words for Wednesday)

The Logical Vegetarian by G. K. Chesterton. This was published in Wine, Water, and Song just last week (er, 1915)…

“Why shouldn’t I have a purely vegetarian drink? Why shouldn’t I take vegetables in their highest form, so to speak? The modest vegetarians ought obviously to stick to wine or beer, plain vegetarian drinks, instead of filling their goblets with the blood of bulls and elephants, as all conventional meat-eaters do, I suppose.” — DALROY.

You will find me drinking rum,
Like a sailor in a slum,
You will find me drinking beer like a Bavarian.
You will find me drinking gin
In the lowest kind of inn,
Because I am a rigid Vegetarian. [Read more...]

For Your Good Friday Night at the Movies

It’s Good Friday, and again I am presenting a film that I’ve only recently discovered. In truth, it is a television show, dating from back in the 1970′s. But as the main character is G.K. Chesterton’s beloved character named Father Brown, I gave it a look and enjoyed this episode immensely. I think you may enjoy it too. [Read more...]

G.K. Chesterton on “The Penance of Boredom”

Last year on this day, I shared an off-the-wall poem about Palm Sunday penned by G.K. Chesterton. This time around, I’d like to share the prologue to his collection of four novellas that were published and entitled as, “The Four Faultless Felons.” Tying it all together is a prologue and epilogue on a model of virtue know as Count Raoul de Marillac.

As always, GKC has a way of turning matters on their head, and looking at them upside down in a way that is uniquely Catholic. The Prologue of the Pressman does just that. Reading it, I can’t help but think he was on to something here, with asceticism turned on its head as “the penance of boredom.” Don’t judge a book by its cover… [Read more...]


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