Because Joseph of Cupertino Could Fly

—Feast of St. Joseph of Cupertino

A few years ago, the world was held in thrall by Stephen Hawking’s declaration that there is no need for a Creator for the universe to have been formed. The giant had spoken, succinctly, and confidently. If you are like me, you haven’t read his new book, but you probably saw the interview with Larry King.

One of my take-away’s from the interview? Stephen Hawking gushing over his experience of being weightless. He got to take a flight on one of those NASA planes that climbs parabolically so at the “top”, for a short while, zero-G is achieved. He evidently was thrilled to be weightless. [Read more...]

Why Erasmus Stayed Catholic (A Few Thoughts For Thursday)

I have never been an apostate from the Catholic Church. I know that in this Church, which you call the Papist Church, there are many who displease me, but such I also see in your Church. One bears more easily the evils to which one is accustomed. Therefore I bear with this Church, until I see a better, and it cannot help bearing with me, until I shall myself be better. And he does not sail badly who steers a middle course between two several evils.

–Erasmus, Hyperaspistes, 1526

Got Five Minutes? Learn Some Catholic History

His Catholic history cup runneth over.

Good news, dear reader. McNamara’s Blog has fired up again. My learned friend, Pat McNamara has also come up with a great idea on taking Catholic history out of the ivory tower, and bringing it down to where it belongs, e.g., with the sheep.

Behold! Catholic History in Less Than Five Minutes. Here’s the first episode. [Read more...]

The Quest For The Origins Of The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

Adoration of the Trinty, by Albrecht Durer

What is the deal with celebrating Trinity Sunday? After all, isn’t every Mass a celebration of our Triune God? So why a special Sunday dedicated as a feast to God, in three persons?

That question is why I picked up my torch and started on a quest to find the origins of this feast day. In truth, an amicable tussle with a friend of mine is what led me on the search to solve this riddle. Want to come along? [Read more...]

A Clarification About The Deaths Of 800 Children In Tuam, Ireland, And More…UPDATED

…rolls of the presses of The Irish Times. Writing therein, Rosita Boland teases out more truth from the story by interviewing Catherine Corless, the local historian whose patient, self-funded, efforts to commemorate these children’s memories, got unwittingly added to the spin-cycle part of the news.

‘I never used that word ‘dumped’,” Catherine Corless, a local historian in Co Galway, tells The Irish Times. “I never said to anyone that 800 bodies were dumped in a septic tank. That did not come from me at any point. They are not my words.” [Read more...]

Remembering, With Gratitude, The D-Day Sacrifices Of The Fallen

Destroyed town in northwest France, summer 1944
Frank Scherschel—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Pope Francis remembers, and is grateful.

Francis praised “the numerous soldiers who left their country to land on the beaches of Normandy to fight against Nazi barbarism and free occupied France”.

The Vatican said Francis “also does not forget the German soldiers dragged into this drama, like all victims of war”.

Though written long before the invasion of Normandy, G.K. Chesterton’s thoughts from his book, Orthodoxy (1908), captures the paradox faced by the soldier, and why gratitude for their courageous efforts (when exercised justly) is something not to be taken for granted by us, but to be lauded and praised.

“Take the case of courage. [Read more...]

Napoleon Bonaparte: The Portrait of The Unintentional Disciple As A Young Man

There is much talk these days about discipleship among the flock. Moving beyond the individual call to holiness, questions surround the call of the faithful on how to live the vocation of being a disciple of Christ. When Jesus ascended into heaven, an event commemorated by the Church today throughout the world, he made an announcement to all who were present,

“All power in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”

As St. Luke reminds us, a couple of angels came down and said, “snap out of it!,” as folks gazed longingly up at the sky. Then, as now, the questions on how to be a disciple began. How to practice the gospel?  How to encourage discipleship? How to define the word? How to build a culture that helps  us spread the gospel?

Fast forward to today, and many are apt to get nostalgic for the way things used to be. [Read more...]

A Funny Thing I Noticed About “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey” UPDATED

 

Have you been watching the show? Perhaps I should rephrase that to, “Did you watch the second episode?” I haven’t seen much written about the second episode, so I figure only Artur Rosman and I may have actually sat through it. Doing so, it became pretty clear to me that scientism, and not science, is what is on display in Seth MacFarlane’s show. That and the creativity of his cartoons. [Read more...]

As the Biblical Epics Roll Into Theaters, Remember This: Bela Lugosi Played Jesus…

Those eyes!

No. Really.

When? In 1909. Where? In a live Easter passion play, somewhere.

Dangerous Minds has the details.

You may now go one about your business.

Does God Hate Flags? An Answer On The 69th Anniversary Of The Flag Raising On Iwo Jima

69 years ago today…

I saw a blog post with this title recently: God Hates Flags: The Public Nature of Theology. It’s a pretty good piece written by Artur Rosman regarding the events going down in Ukraine.

I respect Rosman’s viewpoints regarding events in Eastern Europe, as he is from Poland. But I’ve been reading the Bible a little, and from this passage in Numbers it appears that no, God does not hate flags. [Read more...]


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