Because “And You Shall Name Him יהושע”

The Annunciation, Domenico Beccafumi

Remember chanting the antiphon “O Adonai”  a few weeks ago?  We translate Adonai as LORD, which is substituted for YHWH, the unpronounceable name of God.

Well in the case of Our Lord Jesus, there is more, much more, than I ever knew than I did before I became a Catholic. Today, as you can see from the liturgical calendar,  we celebrate the Feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus.

Now might be a good time to explore the question, What’s in a name? [Read more...]

For Mind Blowing, Franciscan Thoughts, on the Incarnation by Bl. John Duns Scotus UPDATED

Madonna Adoring the Christ Child, Pietro Da Vicenza

Madonna Adoring the Christ Child, Pietro Da Vicenza

What follows is a republished version of a post I ran on Christmas day in the Year of Our Lord, 2012. I’ll even leave the comments  that were published from thoughtful readers at that time. Enjoy!

Merry Christmas, everyone! On December 25, we Christians celebrate the birth into time of our King, our Redeemer, and our God. That day is the day we celebrate the birth of the Christ, the anointed one, born in Bethlehem. We call it the Feast of the Nativity.

As feasts in the Church go, this is a biggie. As Deacon Greg shared on his blog the other day, St. John Chrysostom, in a homily dated from the year 386, invites us to, [Read more...]

Because Joseph of Cupertino Could Fly

—Feast of St. Joseph of Cupertino

A few years ago, the world was held in thrall by Stephen Hawking’s declaration that there is no need for a Creator for the universe to have been formed. The giant had spoken, succinctly, and confidently. If you are like me, you haven’t read his new book, but you probably saw the interview with Larry King.

One of my take-away’s from the interview? Stephen Hawking gushing over his experience of being weightless. He got to take a flight on one of those NASA planes that climbs parabolically so at the “top”, for a short while, zero-G is achieved. He evidently was thrilled to be weightless. [Read more...]

A Clarification About The Deaths Of 800 Children In Tuam, Ireland, And More…UPDATED

 

…rolls of the presses of The Irish Times. Writing therein, Rosita Boland teases out more truth from the story by interviewing Catherine Corless, the local historian whose patient, self-funded, efforts to commemorate these children’s memories, got unwittingly added to the spin-cycle part of the news.

‘I never used that word ‘dumped’,” Catherine Corless, a local historian in Co Galway, tells The Irish Times. “I never said to anyone that 800 bodies were dumped in a septic tank. That did not come from me at any point. They are not my words.” [Read more...]

Because the Mandated HHS Rules Strike at the Heart of Freedom

Originally, this post was published in mid-January, 2012. A few days later, the thoughts I read by John Courtney Murray, SJ, inspired me to draft the little petition that, with the help of 29,000+ folks, got the White House’s attention when they determined that the HSS Mandate was, for the Church, a “fait accompli.”

Given Justice Sotomayor’s decision to block the Administration’s HHS Mandate toward’s The Little Sisters of the Poor, I’ve decided to dust this off and republish it. [Read more...]

To Leave the Shackles of Human History Behind

Image credit: Adam Cuerden.

“Hancock at Gettysburg,” credit: Adam Cuerden.

 

It is ironic to run a post with a title claiming that one of the reasons Why I Am Catholic is to leave history behind. Especially when I have written in the past that one of the main reasons why I am Catholic today is because of Church history. Let me explain this paradox. [Read more...]

Because God Became Human To Save Us All

The title of this post says it all. Why bother becoming a Christian unless you believe this? “God became human to save us all.” And if you do believe it, why not practice the ancient faith of the earliest Christians? The one that, despite criticisms attempting to prove the opposite, has developed since Christ ascended to heaven, and yet has not done so at the expense of Biblical (and doctrinal) truth.

This post is not an attempt to explain all of that. That is what this blog, and a lifetime of study, prayer, and reflection, is for. Today though, just for a few minutes, pause from all the crises and craziness of your daily life to ponder the fact that God became a human being. [Read more...]

For Thoughts on Atheism by the Father of Empiricism UPDATED

 

Remember my affection for the Harvard Classics, the Five Foot Shelf of Books? Admittedly, I haven’t looked them over much since I became a Catholic. Not because I’ve outgrown them, but because there have been far too many other books to occupy my time since the spring of 2008. Mostly stuff from authors whose names begin with “S”,  as St. Philip Neri suggested when he counseled that reading the works of the saints is profitable.

But I dipped a toe back into the HCFFSB water today and found these thoughts of Sir Francis Bacon. [Read more...]

Because The Case for Marian Devotion Is Iron-Clad

On the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, it’s a good time for a little post on Marian devotion, wouldn’t you agree? Because if it’s Advent, ’tis the season for carping about Catholics and their overdone attachment to the Mother of Christ.

So I’ve got a two-for-one post to help explain this predilection of ours, via the old media (from a book you can’t find) and via the new media from a You Tube video, which ironically is based on passages from ancient media (the Bible). [Read more...]

A Quote for Election Seasons, Past, Present, and Future

 

“It is your duty to vote. To neglect to do so would be a culpable abdication of duty on your part. It is your duty to vote honestly; that is to say, for men worthy of your esteem and trust. It is your duty to vote wisely; that is to say, in such a way as not to waste your votes. It would be better to cast them for candidates who, although not giving complete satisfaction to all our legitimate demands, would lead us to expect from them a line of conduct useful to the country, rather than to keep your votes for others whose program would indeed be more perfect, but whose almost certain defeat might open the door to the enemies of religion and of the social order.”

Fr. John A Ryan, DD, formerly the Professor of Moral Theology at the Catholic University of America, democracy of the dead (requiescat in pace)


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X