The Quest For The Origins Of The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

Adoration of the Trinty, by Albrecht Durer

What is the deal with celebrating Trinity Sunday? After all, isn’t every Mass a celebration of our Triune God? So why a special Sunday dedicated as a feast to God, in three persons?

That question is why I picked up my torch and started on a quest to find the origins of this feast day. In truth, an amicable tussle with a friend of mine is what led me on the search to solve this riddle. Want to come along? [Read more…]

A Clarification About The Deaths Of 800 Children In Tuam, Ireland, And More…UPDATED

 

…rolls of the presses of The Irish Times. Writing therein, Rosita Boland teases out more truth from the story by interviewing Catherine Corless, the local historian whose patient, self-funded, efforts to commemorate these children’s memories, got unwittingly added to the spin-cycle part of the news.

‘I never used that word ‘dumped’,” Catherine Corless, a local historian in Co Galway, tells The Irish Times. “I never said to anyone that 800 bodies were dumped in a septic tank. That did not come from me at any point. They are not my words.” [Read more…]

Remembering, With Gratitude, The D-Day Sacrifices Of The Fallen

Destroyed town in northwest France, summer 1944
Frank Scherschel—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Pope Francis remembers, and is grateful.

Francis praised “the numerous soldiers who left their country to land on the beaches of Normandy to fight against Nazi barbarism and free occupied France”.

The Vatican said Francis “also does not forget the German soldiers dragged into this drama, like all victims of war”.

Though written long before the invasion of Normandy, G.K. Chesterton’s thoughts from his book, Orthodoxy (1908), captures the paradox faced by the soldier, and why gratitude for their courageous efforts (when exercised justly) is something not to be taken for granted by us, but to be lauded and praised.

“Take the case of courage. [Read more…]

Because the Mandated HHS Rules Strike at the Heart of Freedom

Originally, this post was published in mid-January, 2012. A few days later, the thoughts I read by John Courtney Murray, SJ, inspired me to draft the little petition that, with the help of 29,000+ folks, got the White House’s attention when they determined that the HSS Mandate was, for the Church, a “fait accompli.”

Given Justice Sotomayor’s decision to block the Administration’s HHS Mandate toward’s The Little Sisters of the Poor, I’ve decided to dust this off and republish it. [Read more…]

To Leave the Shackles of Human History Behind

Image credit: Adam Cuerden.

“Hancock at Gettysburg,” credit: Adam Cuerden.

 

It is ironic to run a post with a title claiming that one of the reasons Why I Am Catholic is to leave history behind. Especially when I have written in the past that one of the main reasons why I am Catholic today is because of Church history. Let me explain this paradox. [Read more…]

This Is The Kind Of Chart One Can Stare At For Hours…UPDATED

I found it folded neatly in the back of volume one of Philip Hughes’ A History of the Church: An Introductory Study. I picked it up for $2.00 at the public library’s used book sale earlier this year.

Here on one piece of paper is all that was happening between the time Sts. Peter and Paul were martyred, up until the Edict of Milan. Sorry it’s a little cock-eyed, but this is the best I could do. [Read more…]

For Novels Like Shusaku Endo’s, “The Samurai” UPDATED

A portrait of Lord Hasekura visiting Rome. Public Domain

First things first, I’ve never read Silence by Shusaku Endo. I can at least say that I’ve heard of it, though, due to the fact that Martin Scorsese has been planning to make a movie based on it for what seems like forever. [Read more…]

The Martyrdom of Sir Thomas More (For All The Saints) UPDATED

 

Sir Thomas More, Hans Holbein, the Younger.

Sir Thomas More, Hans Holbein, the Younger.

Not all Christians are hypocrites all the time. The proof of that statement resides in the Church Triumphant, specifically in the witness of the martyrs for the Faith. Yes indeed, the Communion of Saints is a treasure house of role models of redeemed fallenness.

Take, for instance, St. Thomas More, patron saint of lawyers, martyr for religious freedom, whose Feast we celebrate today. [Read more…]

The Death of Christendom? December 15, 1791, when the Bill of Rights was Ratified

It being the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, and Inaguration Day too, I’m taking the liberty to republish a post you may have missed the first time ’round (April 09,2012).

For those of you longing for the days of yore, when the culture was seemingly steeped in Christianity, and all acknowledged it as the one true faith, I’ve got some news for you. Though the faith is alive and well, Christendom is dead and gone. Before you fall all over yourself in consternation, fear and loathing, it’s time to have a look at that word and recall its meaning. [Read more…]

For All the Saints: John, Apostle and Evangelist UPDATED

John the Evangelist, El Greco (Public Domain).

Today is the feast day of St. John, the “disciple whom Jesus loved.” Jesus called him and his brother James the “sons of thunder,” so they must have been quite a lively pair. This is a portrait of the young John painted by El Greco.

What follows is the citation on John from Jesuit Father Francis Xavier Weninger’s book, Lives of the Saints. [Read more…]


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