The Death of Christendom? December 15, 1791, when the Bill of Rights was Ratified

It being the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, and Inaguration Day too, I’m taking the liberty to republish a post you may have missed the first time ’round (April 09,2012).

For those of you longing for the days of yore, when the culture was seemingly steeped in Christianity, and all acknowledged it as the one true faith, I’ve got some news for you. Though the faith is alive and well, Christendom is dead and gone. Before you fall all over yourself in consternation, fear and loathing, it’s time to have a look at that word and recall its meaning. [Read more...]

For All the Saints: John, Apostle and Evangelist UPDATED

Today is the feast day of St. John, the “disciple whom Jesus loved.” Jesus called him and his brother James the “sons of thunder,” so they must have been quite a lively pair. This is a portrait of the young John painted by El Greco.

What follows is the citation on John from Jesuit Father Francis Xavier Weninger’s book, Lives of the Saints. [Read more...]

For Mind Blowing, Franciscan Thoughts, on the Incarnation by Bl. John Duns Scotus UPDATED

Merry Christmas, everyone. Today we Christians celebrate the birth into time of our King, our Redeemer, and our God. This is the day when Christ, the anointed one, was born in Bethlehem. We call it the Feast of the Nativity.

As feasts in the Church go, this is a biggie. As Deacon Greg shared on his blog the other day, St. John Chrysostom, in a homily dated from the year 386, invites us to, [Read more...]

In a Cave Underground…

a King was born.

And on December 25. Sing it Neil, [Read more...]

Because God Became Human To Save Us All

The title of this post says it all. Why bother becoming a Christian unless you believe this? “God became human to save us all.” And if you do believe it, why not practice the ancient faith of the earliest Christians? The one that, despite criticisms attempting to prove the opposite, has developed since Christ ascended to heaven, and yet has not done so at the expense of Biblical truth.

This post is not an attempt to explain all of that. That is what this blog, and a lifetime of study, prayer, and reflection, is for. Today though, just for a few minutes, pause from all the crises and craziness of your daily life to ponder the fact that God became a human being. [Read more...]

For Thoughts on Atheism by the Father of Empiricism UPDATED

 

Remember my affection for the Harvard Classics, the Five Foot Shelf of Books? Admittedly, I haven’t looked them over much since I became a Catholic. Not because I’ve outgrown them, but because there have been far too many other books to occupy my time since the spring of 2008. Mostly stuff from authors whose names begin with “S”,  as St. Philip Neri suggested when he counseled that reading the works of the saints is profitable.

But I dipped a toe back into the HCFFSB water today and found these thoughts of Sir Francis Bacon. [Read more...]

Ember Days: What They Are And Where They Went

Photographer Credit: Tyler Parks

Today is the first Ember Day of autumn, the week after the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross.

A long time ago, in a world that seems so very far away, Christian traditions rooted in simple faith thrived among the flock. One such tradition is the celebration of what are known as Ember Days. Traditionally, the first Wednesday after Guadete Sunday is the first Ember Day of Winter.

What are these mysterious days of penance and fasting? Their name alone evokes thoughts of a glimmer of light shed upon a dark world. And yet the story of the practice of this devotion has nothing to do with embers, kindling, or ashes, though it is true that the image of glowing splinters of hot coals did appear in my mind’s eye when I first learned of them. They still do. [Read more...]

Because “And You Shall Name Him יהושע”

Today we sing the antiphon “O Adonai,” which we translate as LORD, but which is substituted for YHWH, the unpronounceable name of God.

What’s in a name? Well in the case of Our Lord Jesus, there is more, much more, than I ever knew than I did before I became a Catholic. Shortly after the  New Year, we’ll celebrate the Feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus. But why wait until then to learn about the name Gabriel delivered unto the young teenager named Mary? [Read more...]

Cardinal Dolan Notes Media Silence on Recent Court Decision

Though regular readers here, on New Advent, and at Stand With the US Bishops Against HHS learned all about the recent decision regarding the HHS Mandate in suits filed by the Archdiocese of New York, Cardinal Dolan notes that no one outside of the Catholic bubble noticed it. I reckon the Sunday news shows are busy discussing Fiscal Cliffs and trouble with Health Exchanges to bother reporting on a rebuff to the Administration.

No news is better than bad news? Perhaps for the Administration and its apologists. His Eminence explains, [Read more...]

Because the Case for Marian Devotion is Iron-Clad

On the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, it’s a good time for a little post on Marian devotion, wouldn’t you agree? Because if it’s Advent, ’tis the season for carping about Catholics and their overdone attachment to the Mother of Christ.

So I’ve got a two-for-one post to help explain this predilection of ours, via the old media (from a book you can’t find) and via the new media from a You Tube video, which ironically is based on passages from ancient media (the Bible). [Read more...]


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