For Thoughts On The Solemnity Of The Most Sacred Heart Of Jesus

Are you on vacation yet? The funny thing about vacations is that when on holiday from the world, and from the pressures of time, it’s quite easy to see all manner of things through rose colored glasses. In fact, I would go so far as to say that everything is better when one is on vacation, be it food, music, company, or conversation. Have you noticed this too? The phenomenon is what leads me to believe vacations are a foretaste of eternal life in heaven. [Read more...]

For The Prayers Of St. Gregory Of Narek (A Few Words For Wednesday) UPDATED

Grigor Narekatsi, Ms. 1568 (1173), Matenadaran, Yerevan, Armenia. Public Domain.

Grigor Narekatsi, Ms. 1568 (1173), Matenadaran, Yerevan, Armenia. Public Domain.

A few days ago, Pope Francis declared St. Gregory of Narek our newest Doctor of the Church. It appears that Grigor Narekatsi is a man of many talents. The hastily compiled list of his accomplishments on Wikipedia includes,

“monk, poet, mystical philosopher, theologian and saint of the Armenian Apostolic Church, born into a family of writers.”

From what I gather, he composed some very beautiful prayers that I look forward to pondering as a part of the Lenten triumvirate of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving. [Read more...]

Walt Whitman’s Prayer of Columbus

Happy Columbus Day! I’ve a poem to share with you on the day on which we celebrate Christopher Columbus’ completing his voyage to the New World. And though nowadays the smart money seems to be on disparaging Christopher Columbus, I’ll be taking another path, thanks.

Ignatian spirituality tries to find God in all things. Many take issue with that premise, especially when stuck knee deep in the mire of day-to-day problems. I don’t claim to be Ignatian in my outlook (nor Franciscan, Benedictine, etc) on events or things. As a Catholic, I’m a little bit of all of those charisms, and more. But I do believe God works through the secular, just as I have faith that all things work for the good.

Here’s an example for you from the Pantheist, non-Catholic, and everything else wrong with the world, pen of Walt Whitman. [Read more...]

Lines By The Forgotten Member Of The Chesterbelloc (A Few Words For Wednesday)

NPG 3654; Conversation piece (G.K. Chesterton; Maurice Baring; Hilaire Belloc) by Sir James Gunn

Conversation Piece (G. K. Chesterton; Maurice Baring; Hilaire Belloc), by Herbert James Gunn

What? There is a third person in the Chesterbelloc? George Bernard Shaw forgot someone? Exactly, dear reader.

See the portrait above? Surely you recognize the heavyset fellow on the left, and the irascible looking fellow on the right. But who is the tall guy in the center? That would be Maurice Baring, the friend G.B. Shaw forgot. [Read more...]

A Poem on St. John the Baptist’s Day

 

"St. John the Baptist Preaching Before Herod," Hans Fries, 1514.

“St. John the Baptist Preaching Before Herod,” Hans Fries, 1514.

Happy Birthday to St. John the Baptist! Here is a little poem I found written by John Keble in honor of this, the greatest of all men. [Read more...]

For Poems Like This For Childermas

Childermas, by Peter Paul Rubens (1609-1611)

-Feast of the Holy Innocents 

Have you ever heard of Emily Hickey? Me either, at least not until just now. Born in 1845, she is a child of the Emerald Isle, an Irish lass born in 1845 into a family fathered by a Protestant Minister of the Church of Ireland.

But somehow she decided to swim the Tiber and she was received into the Catholic Church in 1901. Prior to doing so, her literary talents were well known in her day, her poems being published in literary journals and such. [Read more...]

For this Hymn by St. Thomas Aquinas (Zion, To Thy Savior Singing)


I am late in coming around to an appreciation of St. Thomas Aquinas. As the old saw goes, better late than never. Jacques Maritain’s book The Peasant of the Garonne has pointed me towards learning more about this Doctor of the Church. [Read more...]

For This Hymn Commemorating the Baptism of Our Lord

On the Liturgical Calendar today, the Church celebrates the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord. Below is the conclusion of a three part kontakion written by Saint Romanus, the Melodist, in the 6th century. It was written and sung to commemorate this holy event. [Read more...]

From T. S. Eliot’s “Four Quartets” (A Few Words for Wednesday)

 

1962 Oil Painting by Sir Gerald Kelly.
National Portrait Gallery. Smithsonian Institution,
Washington D.C.

T.S. Eliot has been lauded in this space before. You see, he moved on from the Wasteland and the Hollow Men, and  found succor and refreshment in the fields of the Lord. Even when the world he knew was ramping up for, and rent in two by, war, as was the case when he composed the Nobel Prize winning Four Quartets (1936-1942).

Such was the backdrop of the selection I share with you today. [Read more...]

News Flash: Dead Chinese Jesuit Befriends Catholic Blogger

You may remember my friend named Wu Li, SJ.  I introduced him to you in a post a few years back.Wu died as a Jesuit priest in Macau in 1718.

There is something about departed Catholics and me. I’m like Haley Joel Osment in The Sixth Sense, or something. Except I don’t really see dead people. But I make friends with them so maybe they might be saints. [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X