From T. S. Eliot’s “Four Quartets” (A Few Words for Wednesday)

 

1962 Oil Painting by Sir Gerald Kelly.
National Portrait Gallery. Smithsonian Institution,
Washington D.C.

T.S. Eliot has been lauded in this space before. You see, he moved on from the Wasteland and the Hollow Men, and  found succor and refreshment in the fields of the Lord. Even when the world he knew was ramping up for, and rent in two by, war, as was the case when he composed the Nobel Prize winning Four Quartets (1936-1942).

Such was the backdrop of the selection I share with you today. [Read more…]

News Flash: Dead Chinese Jesuit Befriends Catholic Blogger

You may remember my friend named Wu Li, SJ.  I introduced him to you in a post a few years back.Wu died as a Jesuit priest in Macau in 1718.

There is something about departed Catholics and me. I’m like Haley Joel Osment in The Sixth Sense, or something. Except I don’t really see dead people. But I make friends with them so maybe they might be saints. [Read more…]

Thoughts from the “Tao Teh Ching” translated by the “Chinese Chesterton”

 

Amazon_Tao_Teh_Ching

My Chinese Catholic friend, John C.H. Wu wrote several works that I have enjoyed reading over the past several years. I’ve shared posts with you from several of his books, namely Beyond East and West, The Science of Love, and Interior Carmel, the Threefold Way of Love. It is not for nothing that Frank Sheed called John “the Chinese Chesterton.” [Read more…]

Because Tradition says December 25 is When Christ was Born

And that is good enough for me. Especially because smarter, more capable, and more knowledgeable folks spell it all out for me too.

Fr. Dwight Longenecker: Christmas, Pagan Romans, and Frodo Baggins.

Jake Tawney: The Dating of Christmas.

Alexander Pope: Messiah

And, of course, Linus reciting the passage from St. Luke.

Isn’t Govert Teunisz Flinck’s painting, Angels Announcing the Birth to the Shepherds (1639, oil on wood) beautiful?

Be of good cheer!

UPDATE: Mike Flynn’s letter to the editor.

For All the Saints: John of the Cross

“Zurbarán St. John of the Cross” by Francisco de Zurbarán  Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Today is the feast day of St. John of the Cross, Doctor of the Church. Born in 1542, he was a contemporary of St. Teresa of Avila and a practitioner of contemplative prayer. He is considered one of the foremost poets of Spain. And yet, it is said that he only wrote about 2500 lines of verse. He died on this date at the age of 49 in the year 1591. [Read more…]

Because St. Ambrose Could Write Such A Hymn

Today is the Feast day commemorating Saint Ambrose, Bishop of Milan and one of the first four Doctors of the Church. The painting above depicts St. Ambrose with Emperor Theodosius of Rome. The reason they got together? The Emperor had ordered the massacre of 7,000 people in Thessalonica, and Ambrose demanded that he do public penance. [Read more…]

Because Conversion Works Like This

At least this has been my experience. Perhaps this poem by Emily Henrietta Hickey can help me explain. [Read more…]

For All Creatures, Great and Small

Howdy fellah!

This is Reason #374 why I don’t live in “the big city.” I rumbled up the driveway in the Mustang, and as I lined her up to back into the garage, I spied “Mikey” in all his camouflaged glory crawling up the side of the other car. Sounds like a lead-in for an article in Big Backyard magazine, doesn’t it?
[Read more…]

Because Christ Is In Every Book of the Bible

Interestingly, I missed this video (below) last week when Deacon Greg Kandra ran it over at his place. Maybe there is a reason for that. You see, earlier this week some friends of mine got into a discussion regarding books of the Bible. [Read more…]

A Chinese “Spiritual” (A Few Words For Wednesday)

I’ve been reading John C.H. Wu’s The Interior Carmel: The Threefold Way of Love. This morning, I caught the shuttle bus from the parking lot to the bus stop right outside of my office back-door. As I was drinking my coffee during the ride, I dipped into my book bag and flipped open John’s book. Guess what I found?

Before my eyes were the words to a little ditty that John suggests “when spiritually interpreted, will perhaps give an inkling of the joy of the saints.” I think you will agree that they do. And in the spirit of “for God so loved the world,” enjoy this depiction of the rooster/world by graphic artist Kentaro Nagai.

from “an old Chinese love-song,”

Cold is the wind, chill the rain.
The cock crows kikeriki.
Now that I have seen my Love,
Peace has come to me.

The wind whistles, the rain drizzles.
The cock crows kukeriku.

From a newly discovered1500 year
old church in Israel

Now that I have seen my Love,
My sickness is healed too.

The wind and the rain darken the day.
The cock ceases not to crow.
Now that I have seen my Love,
My joy ceases not to grow.


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