For Poems Like This For Childermas

Childermas, by Peter Paul Rubens (1609-1611)

-Feast of the Holy Innocents 

Have you ever heard of Emily Hickey? Me either, at least not until just now. Born in 1845, she is a child of the Emerald Isle, an Irish lass born in 1845 into a family fathered by a Protestant Minister of the Church of Ireland.

But somehow she decided to swim the Tiber and she was received into the Catholic Church in 1901. Prior to doing so, her literary talents were well known in her day, her poems being published in literary journals and such. [Read more…]

A Brandy G.K Chesterton Would Approve Of…

Who knew?

I think so. I mean, look at the name on the label. Lepanto? As in the Battle of Lepanto?

Uh-huh.  [Read more…]

Andrea Doria, Lepanto, and the Power of the Rosary

When I was a kid, I really enjoyed reading history. Usually, I wasn’t reading the history that I was supposed to be reading in the classroom.  I really didn’t do that well in school until I served two hitches in the Marines and then decided to get out and go to college. Grade school and high school? Homework, schmomework! [Read more…]

This Is My Friend (A Few Words for Wednesday)

 

This Is My Friend (from an old manuscript)

Let me tell you how I made His acquaintance.
I had heard much of Him, but took no heed.
He sent daily gifts and presents, but I never thanked Him.
He often seemed to want my friendship, but I remained
cold. [Read more…]

I Could Listen to Seamus Heaney Reading “Beowulf” For Hours (Requiescat In Pace) UPDATES


I shared what follows last summer. I’m sharing it with you again because this morning I learned that Seamus Heany has crossed over from death into eternity. Here’s a snippet from the obituary posted by the BBC. [Read more…]

Salman Rushdie on the “Culture of Offendedness,” and Thoughts of Other Authors Whose Names Start With “S”

From The Independent, with a dateline out of Edinburgh, the noted author observes that we’re all too offended nowadays. What? You hadn’t noticed? [Read more…]

Nobody Does A Gerard Manley Hopkins Poem Like Richard Burton (A Few Words for Wednesday)

Remember watching The Robe?

The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo, as Gerard Manley Hopkins  meant them to be delivered. [Read more…]

For Thoughts on the Trinity By Way of China, Circa 1700…

…with a little help from a few other sources.

Today is the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity. I have no doubt that my friend Wu Li, SJ was exposed to the Athanasian Creed. Why? Because Wu could not have written the orthodox poems below without having believed in the Mystery of the Triune God. Wu wasn’t just parroting something he had heard from his Jesuit catechists either, you see. It is obvious that he pondered this mystery in his heart.

Like all great poets, Wu parsed the words of the creed and reduced them down in a manner that leaves us better able to have faith in the mystery of God in three Persons.  [Read more…]

Anderson Cooper Tacks To Windward, Asks Hard Questions About the Gosnell Case

I’m not sure if you were able to see the telecast from his show last night, so I’ll embed the video here. [Read more…]

A Poem and a Prayer as a Pontiff Retires


Today’s gospel reading is a fitting reminder that the Christian model of leadership is not of this earth. Of course, Our Redeemer, who had also said “before Abraham was, I Am,” was of heaven. Thus Jesus tells the disciples, [Read more…]