Goethe Suggests a Blog Post. Who Am I to Say No?

‎One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words. – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Good advice, that. I wonder what sort of blogger Goethe would have made? He and I are like minded this morning, because there has been a song playing in my head, I just read something that I want to share with you, and I love fine pictures, even when I stumble often when it comes to speaking reasonable words. [Read more…]

The May Magnificat (A Few Words for Wednesday)

God is simple, God is all. In his wisdom, he gave us his only begotten son, the new Adam. Jesus, then, is the reimaged God, or God, Version 2.0, if you will.

This God-Man, Jesus, has a Mother, and as such, so do we. For if we are adopted sons and daughters of God, and God became a man, by the power of the Holy Spirit, born of a woman, then the Blessed Virgin, Mary Immaculate, is both his mother, the Theotokos, and ours too. Indeed, Our Mother magnifies Our Lord, and points us ever towards Him. [Read more…]

The Logical Vegetarian (A Few Words for Wednesday)

The Logical Vegetarian by G. K. Chesterton. This was published in Wine, Water, and Song just last week (er, 1915)…

“Why shouldn’t I have a purely vegetarian drink? Why shouldn’t I take vegetables in their highest form, so to speak? The modest vegetarians ought obviously to stick to wine or beer, plain vegetarian drinks, instead of filling their goblets with the blood of bulls and elephants, as all conventional meat-eaters do, I suppose.” — DALROY.

You will find me drinking rum,
Like a sailor in a slum,
You will find me drinking beer like a Bavarian.
You will find me drinking gin
In the lowest kind of inn,
Because I am a rigid Vegetarian. [Read more…]

On Divine Mercy Sunday, Shakespeare and a Song


A truth about us as human beings is that we desire justice and not mercy. Yet we have been taught that God desires mercy. He said so himself. And today, Divine Mercy Sunday, we are reminded that Our Lord’s mercy is larger than not only all of our sins, but of all of the sins of the entire world. Past, present, and future. [Read more…]

“Change” (A Few Words for Wednesday)

A poem for the season by Katharine Tynan. [Read more…]

Thoughts from the “Tao Teh Ching” translated by the “Chinese Chesterton”

 

Amazon_Tao_Teh_Ching

My Chinese Catholic friend, John C.H. Wu wrote several works that I have enjoyed reading over the past several years. I’ve shared posts with you from several of his books, namely Beyond East and West, The Science of Love, and Interior Carmel, the Threefold Way of Love. It is not for nothing that Frank Sheed called John “the Chinese Chesterton.” [Read more…]

Songs of Education, History (A Few Words for Wednesday)

G.K. Chesterton wrote poems too, and songs, of course. I found this neat little example of satirical verse that could become a quite compelling earworm, when set to a jaunty tune. This is a selection that can be found in Chesterton’s The Ballad of St. Barbara, And Other Verses. This one sounds like it could have come from the comedic masters of Monty Python. [Read more…]

Because Tradition says December 25 is When Christ was Born

And that is good enough for me. Especially because smarter, more capable, and more knowledgeable folks spell it all out for me too.

Fr. Dwight Longenecker: Christmas, Pagan Romans, and Frodo Baggins.

Jake Tawney: The Dating of Christmas.

Alexander Pope: Messiah

And, of course, Linus reciting the passage from St. Luke.

Isn’t Govert Teunisz Flinck’s painting, Angels Announcing the Birth to the Shepherds (1639, oil on wood) beautiful?

Be of good cheer!

UPDATE: Mike Flynn’s letter to the editor.

For All the Saints: John of the Cross

“Zurbarán St. John of the Cross” by Francisco de Zurbarán  Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Today is the feast day of St. John of the Cross, Doctor of the Church. Born in 1542, he was a contemporary of St. Teresa of Avila and a practitioner of contemplative prayer. He is considered one of the foremost poets of Spain. And yet, it is said that he only wrote about 2500 lines of verse. He died on this date at the age of 49 in the year 1591. [Read more…]

Lines on Pride from Alexander Pope’s An Essay On Man

Often times cataclysmic events leave us at a loss. We have feelings and thoughts but struggle to put them into words. Some have been blessed with the gift of the poetic art. These painters of images with words serve to bring the ineffable into focus in our minds. [Read more…]