Because Joseph of Cupertino Could Fly

—Feast of St. Joseph of Cupertino

A few years ago, the world was held in thrall by Stephen Hawking’s declaration that there is no need for a Creator for the universe to have been formed. The giant had spoken, succinctly, and confidently. If you are like me, you haven’t read his new book, but you probably saw the interview with Larry King.

One of my take-away’s from the interview? Stephen Hawking gushing over his experience of being weightless. He got to take a flight on one of those NASA planes that climbs parabolically so at the “top”, for a short while, zero-G is achieved. He evidently was thrilled to be weightless. [Read more...]

Because I Don’t Deserve The Graces That Have Been Bestowed Upon Me, Including Folks Reading This Blog

Smith Corona Typewriter!

You’ll probably want to stop checking in on my blog now, seeing as I don’t have any deep thoughts to offer on whatever the various concerns of the day might be. Yes, you would be justified in removing my blog from your RSS feed, your blogroll, etc.

I really don’t deserve to have folks reading my thoughts at all, when you get right down to it. Joe Six-Pack? Who aspires to such a pedestrian title? [Read more...]

A Poem on St. John the Baptist’s Day

Happy Birthday to St. John the Baptist! Here is a little poem I found written by John Keble in honor of this, the greatest of all men. [Read more...]

The Quest For The Origins Of The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

Adoration of the Trinty, by Albrecht Durer

What is the deal with celebrating Trinity Sunday? After all, isn’t every Mass a celebration of our Triune God? So why a special Sunday dedicated as a feast to God, in three persons?

That question is why I picked up my torch and started on a quest to find the origins of this feast day. In truth, an amicable tussle with a friend of mine is what led me on the search to solve this riddle. Want to come along? [Read more...]

“On Reproof,” A Poem By St. Ephrem of Syria, Deacon, and Doctor of the Church

I came upon these lines while researching St. Ephrem the Syrian, the Deacon, and Doctor of the Church, whose feast day is today.

As it turns out, St. Ephrem wrote almost all of his homilies in verse or as hymns that could be sung to the same tunes that the Arians were singing at the time. What follows are words of wisdom he offers for us to consider as we journey along The Way.

On Reproof by St. Ephrem the Syrian

Let us be builders of our own minds
into temples suitable for God. [Read more...]

St. John of the Cross On What Ails The Catholic Blog-O-Sphere

This just seems random, but it isn’t.

Last week was a pretty embarrassing one in the parish of St. Blogs. It was enough to make me consider if continuing to blog was a worthwhile use of my time. There are other things to do, you know. I have children to raise, a wife to love, tasks to be performed on my day job, and honey-do lists that are a mile long.

Yep, I seriously thought of throwing in the towel . [Read more...]

For Your Saintly Quote of the Week

 

“The times are never so bad that a good man cannot live in them.”

—St. Thomas More

 

Meet A Modern Day Monk Who Lives Atop A Pillar

Remember the pillar saints? Like Simon Stylites the Elder? The next time you think that absolutely nothing can get done in this world unless you get physically involved, remember Maxime the Monk is praying for you.

“When I was young I drank, sold drugs, everything. When I ended up in prison…. It was time for a change. [Read more...]

“The Kingdom of Heaven is like an investment that everyone wants to buy, but no one wants to hold.”

Whut r you doin’, Frank?

Put your Bibles down, folks, because Jesus never said that. It’s just a thought that popped into my head while I was reviewing the results of the last five years of my retirement account. The seed of the thought was probably planted by my reading the gospels as I make my way through the Bible in a year. [Read more...]

Because the “Little Flower” Enchanted the Chinese “Legal Eagle”

I introduced readers to my Catholic friend, John C.H. Wu, a long time ago. What prompted John, a distinguished jurist, and drafter of the democratic constitution of the Republic of China (back when it was mainland China),  to swim the Tiber? Truthfully, I should have said “who” prompted him, not “what.” Blame it all on Saint Thérèse of Lisieux, “the Little Flower.” It is all her fault that my new friend John became a Catholic.

Around the year 1917, when he was 18 years old, John had made the first leap towards Rome when he became a Methodist, in Shanghai mind you. [Read more...]


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