For All the Saints: The Martyrs of Douai College

 

A few days back, we learned about the Bond family and their recusant Catholic past. Also a few days ago, CARA released survey results saying Catholics really want to learn more about the saints, and such. So let’s put it to the test with this post, shall we? Because this post has got it all, from daring do, to fidelity to the faith. Sainthood and martyrdom.

It’s dangerous business being a Catholic.  Dangerous, that is, if your idea of being thought well of is to be looked upon with favor by such worldly paragons as the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the San Francisco Chronicle. If by becoming a Catholic you hope to curry favor with the world, here is a little news flash: that ain’t a gonna happen. It never has, and never will.

[Read more...]

Do People Really Like Pictures Of Puppies Rather Than Posts about Saints?

Cody, bane of package deliverers

That’s one of the observations Thomas L. McDonald had regarding blogging. [Read more...]

For His Majesty’s Secret Service: Agent Henry Morse, SJ


About a week ago, I reported that the world thought the Vatican got all starry-eyed about the latest James Bond film. Did you know that the Bond family were a line of recusant CatholicsOrbis non sufficit.

Perhaps that is part of the reason why L’Osservatore Romano loved the film.

Idea! How about a look at a nonfictional story of recusant Catholics? [Read more...]

After the Election, What Really Matters…UPDATED

There will be much post-election chatter to keep us occupied for days, if not weeks. In the coming hours, much ink will be spilled on the subject and your humble blogger may even indulge in adding to the straw pile of “what it all means” recaps of the election.

But not right now.  [Read more...]

A Prayer About Fatherhood Answered Through the Veil of a Homework Assignment

Once upon a time, I wrote a letter to St. Joseph. His feast day rolled around, and I was writing him because as a father, I was feeling a bit like Sisyphus. You know, the king the gods punished by being forced to roll an immense boulder up a hill, only to watch it roll back down, and to repeat this action forever.

Being a father is like that sometimes, isn’t it? In my note to St. Joseph I made an observation, [Read more...]

Because The Prophet Francis Didn’t Sugar Coat the Faith for Politicos

St. Francis Giving His Mantle to a Poor Man
Giotto de Bondoni, 1297-99

It’s the feast day of St. Francis of Assisi. You might have noticed this, as he is one of the most popular of the fellows in the Communion of Saints. You can read better posts about Francis elsewhere, for sure. I just wanted to share a brief open letter he wrote to the powers that be.

Francis, see, was a lot like Jesus. He even had the wounds of Christ to prove this. But he also had the temerity to tell it like it is, much like John the Baptist and Jesus did. In short, Francis was a fine example of the prophet, priest, and king, as all Christians are called to be.

Here’s an example of his prophet side. [Read more...]

A Poem and a Prayer for Michaelmas UPDATED

 

Today is the Feast of St. Michael and the Archangels, also known as Michaelmas. I like the sound of that calendar name for today’s feast and the knowledge that this day used to be a huge festival marking the beginning of Autumn (which is my favorite season).

I actually hope that this day is still celebrated extravagantly somewhere on the planet. Next year, send me an invitation, or some Michaelmas recipes (and history!) or something. [Read more...]

For Solid Food Like This (Hold the Milk)

Once I met up with Thomas Merton, it didn’t take long for him to introduce me to St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Not exactly the founder of the Cistercian Order, as that distinction belongs to the trio of monks Robert of Molesme, Alberic, and Stephen Harding, all in the Communion of Saints now too, he nonetheless grew the Cistercian Order into a powerhouse of prayer.

Bernard, a Doctor of the Church, was indefatigable in his allegiance to Christ and to the Catholic Church. He was a contemplative, but was constantly being called into action, attending Church councils, while providing counsel to monarchs, and even preaching the Second Crusade. Repairing schisms and matching wits with Peter Abelard (and others constantly), it’s a miracle he had time for prayer, or anything else for that matter.

Personally, I don’t think he slept much. [Read more...]

Because Joseph of Cupertino Could Fly

—Feast of St. Joseph of Cupertino

Two years ago, the world was held in thrall by Stephen Hawking’s declaration that there is no need for a Creator for the universe to have been formed. The giant had spoken, succinctly, and confidently. If you are like me, you haven’t read his new book, but you probably saw the interview with Larry King.

One of my take-away’s from the interview? Stephen Hawking gushing over his experience of being weightless. He got to take a flight on one of those NASA planes that climbs parabolically so at the “top”, for a short while, zero-G is achieved. He evidently was thrilled to be weightless. [Read more...]

Because Now I Know Today is the Birthday of the New Eve

I came pretty close to spending an entire lifetime on planet Earth without knowing that it’s Our Mother’s birthday today. The painting above reflects this event from the perspective of a contemporary Russian artist named Vasili Nesterenko, who painted this in the year of Our Lord, 2002. Here’s a little something else I found in the old Roman Breviary over on the YIMCatholic Bookshelf. Genealogists might get a kick out of it. [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X