Praise for Quiet

Now Featured in the Patheos Book Club
Quiet
The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking
By Susan Cain

Gretchen Rubin"Superbly researched, deeply insightful, and a fascinating read, Quiet is an indispensable resource for anyone who wants to understand the gifts of the introverted half of the population."
Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project

"Cain is ridiculously articulate, and the book is phenomenal. Yes, it's that good. It's well-written, fascinating and filled with rigorous research and surprising stories."
Margarita Tartakovsky

"Cain's intelligence, respect for research, and vibrant prose put Quiet in an elite class with the best books from Malcolm Gladwell, Daniel Pink, and other masters of psychological non-fiction."
Teresa Amabile, Harvard Business School professor and co-author, The Progress Principle

"Susan Cain's Quiet, an earnest and enlightening 300-page inquiry into introversion and its uses. A rich, intelligent book."
The Wall Street Journal

"Intriguing..."
People Magazine

"...a must-read book"
Forbes

"Rather than labor fruitlessly to make introverts something they're not, parents, teachers and employers should in fact encourage the dreamier among us"
Reuters

"Quiet,which is one of the hottest selling books in America right now and was featured as the Time cover story this week, is a reminder of the importance of introspection and solitude in our Facebook, Google+ and Twitter age of incessant updates, retweets, likes and pokes. Amidst all the hype of his IPO, I hope Zuckerberg has the opportunity to sit down and read the excellent Quiet. It may inspire him to think more critically about his 'social mission' and the real value of giving everyone a 'voice' to talk about themselves."
CNN.com

"Cain offers a wealth of useful advice for teachers and parents of introverts... Quietshould interest anyone who cares about how people think, work, and get along, or wonders why the guy in the next cubicle acts that way. It should be required reading for introverts (or their parents) who could use a boost to their self-esteem."
Fortune.com

"In this well-written, unusually thoughtful book, Cain encourages solitude seekers to see themselves anew: not as wallflowers but as powerful forces to be reckoned with."
Whole Living

"Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking shines a light on introverts (whether we like it or not) and makes the case that we, too, have an important role in a world that reveres extroverts."
Ladies Home Journal.com

"Susan Cain's excellent new book on introversion—and the startling power of quiet, even in 2012 America—is such a well-timed, welcome read."
Buffalo News

"Cain makes a good case for a greater recognition in our society for quiet leadership, the creative milieu of solitude, and the need to honor the character qualities of thoughtfulness, sensitivity, and gentleness. Long live the introverts of the world!"
Spirituality and Practice

"Quietdemonstrates just how deep and disturbing is this plague of extroverts—the showoffs,risk-takers, salesmen, charmers, charlatans and politicians"
New York Post

"A vigorous, brainy and highly engaging defense of introversion."
Bookpage

"What Susan Cain understands—and readers of this fascinating volume will soon appreciate—is something that psychology and our fast moving—and talking—society has been all too slow to realize: Not only is there really nothing wrong with being quiet, reflective, shy and introverted, but there are distinct advantages to being this way. Perhaps like those more quiet individuals whom this book heralds, many of us would benefit if we lived according to the old adage about crossing the street: stop, look and listen."
Jay Belsky, Robert M. and Natalie Reid Dorn Professor, Human and Community Development, University of California, Davis

"The author's insights are so rich that she could pen two separate books...An intriguing and potentially life-altering examination of the human psyche that is sure to benefit both introverts and extroverts alike."
Kirkus, Starred Review