Godless Mom: Not Your Average Mommy Blog

Godless Mom: Not Your Average Mommy Blog March 7, 2018

Hello Patheos! I’m Godless Mom. I know, I know… you’re probably thinking, great, another mommy blogger. More posts about dirty diapers and school lunches. Well, you can relax because I am not at all like other mommy bloggers. In fact, the Godless part of Godless Mom carries most of the weight around here. Sure, I talk about parenting, but it’s usually from a secular perspective. Y’know, how to raise little heathens and that sort of thing. Plus, my youngest is nine, so we are far beyond the dirty diaper stage and nestled comfortably in the era of fart jokes.

I’ve been writing as Godless Mom over on godlessmom.com for four years now. My main focus has always been atheism. I love to debunk arguments for god and tackle some of the more nonsensical (and harmful) dogmas out there. I also enjoy talking about my own life being raised as an atheist by a long line of atheists in a series I call Atheist Life Hacks. As you get to know me, you’ll realize as well, that I have a wildly out of control obsession with criminal justice, specifically wrongful convictions and the death penalty. I do write about this a lot as well.

So, who am I? I’m Courtney Heard. I write a financial blog as my day job and am living in sin with the father of my 9-year-old son and my beautiful 15-year-old stepdaughter out here in the Canadian wilderness. We live in a town of 11,000 were every community event is held in one of the many churches. I have my very own pair of Jehovah’s Witnesses assigned to me – we meet every Friday on my front stoop, snow, rain or sun. They’ve been at it for about four years now, and have yet to successfully harvest my soul for the Kingdom.

I have an insatiable wanderlust which makes regular family life a little mundane to me. I feel a bit like a shark; if I stop moving, I will wither away. If I had my way, we’d be homeschooling my babies on a tall ship in between ports as we sailed the world. By now, they’d be fluent in Spanish, French and Maori and they’d be pretty skilled in husking coconuts and catching tuna. Sadly, however, we all must reside in reality no matter how much some of us fight it. We live a pretty good life here in Canada, so I’m not complaining.

My wanderlust comes from my parents dragging my brother and me across the globe throughout my childhood. Before I was legally allowed to drink, I’d been all over Southeast Asia, the South Pacific, Australia, New Zealand and everything in between. I learned to scuba dive in Fiji, how to free dive in Tahiti and how to surf on the west coast of Australia. I even had my son in Mexico. If you stick around here, you’ll be able to read about some of these adventures and maybe even see a photo or two.

As far as being an outspoken atheist goes, my philosophy is pretty straightforward: people are people. I can love a religious person just as ferociously as I can love an atheist. I don’t think religious people are stupid or inferior. Rather, I believe they are just like me, with a differing take on one aspect of life. I have a deep respect for many religious people I’ve had the pleasure of knowing throughout my life, and I often invite them to guest blog for me. I think echo chambers are cancerous, and we need to explore ideas outside of our comfort zone.

Along those lines, many of my readers have already noticed that I have a fondness for people on either side of the many divides in the online atheist community. I will always stand on the side of communication, free speech and a free exchange of ideas. I don’t believe there is a single person on this planet who is incapable of changing their mind. I will not dismiss you for having a differing opinion. I don’t like to block people, censor people or shut people down. I do my best not to get offended, so if you’re looking to offend, you’re going to have to burn some calories.

Aside from all that, I try to tackle a lot of topics with humour. I am no scholar, no master of language or poet or politician. Instead, I’m a down-to-earth Canadian mom who drives a truck, writes about credit for a living and gets a good belly laugh out of her son’s fart jokes. As such, we may dwell in the gutter from time to time.

Things to look forward to on the new Godless Mom blog:

  •  The newest instalment in the Atheist inmates in their own words series – this time, we have an atheist death row inmate in Texas whose guilt is actually in question. He’s written to talk to us about his experiences as an atheist in the capital system.
  • A review of the Waco miniseries – I recently finished watching this and have quite a bit to say about it.
  • My answer to a reader’s question, I just caught my teenaged daughter in bed with her boyfriend, what should I do?
  • New Videos on my YouTube channel

So, I hope you stick around! In the meantime, you can find me in the following places:

I am honoured to be a part of the Patheos community and I look forward to getting to know all of you!

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  • Almost a chimp

    I have my very own pair of Jehovah’s Witnesses assigned to me – we meet every Friday on my front stoop, snow, rain or sun. They’ve been at it for about four years now, and have yet to successfully harvest my soul for the Kingdom.

    You’re clearly not trying hard enough. Much as I hate to brag, my house is both J.W and Mormon free after I a) made a J.W. cry by countering his nonsense, and b) put so much doubt into the head of a young Mormon that he had to be sent back to America for emergency re-indoctrination.
    I must be on both cults’ ‘Don’t Even Bother’ lists, being free of visits for around three years now, even though they’re still active on my street.

  • I admit, I try to be as polite as I can. I do feel bad for some of them. I mean, I know that not all of them want to be wandering the streets in the snow just to have doors slammed in their faces. However, I am honest. I tell them I don’t believe and that I am an atheist and they ask me questions about that, too. I dunno, I don’t hate it. The conversation is interesting.

  • Almost a chimp

    I’m unfailingly polite, never slammed a door on them, even offered religion-friendly cold drinks on hot days. I merely countered myths with facts. The J.W. got so frustrated that he was literally (yes, literally) screaming in impotent rage that this Godless old man wasn’t taking his crap at face value.
    The young Mormon was more interesting. Over several visits he started asking questions, particularly about evolution, and listened to the answers. At first, I think he’d been asking his elders about what I was saying, because his follow-up visits tended to start with the textbook apologist responses, but over time he started asking serious questions. His partner tended to just stand there looking terrified with a sickly grin on his face.
    The last time we met, he asked what books he might read to learn more. I gave him my copy of Steve Jones’ Almost Like a Whale, a re-write of Darwin’s Origin from a modern perspective and very easy to understand, even for a newcomer to evolutionary theory.
    I never saw him, or the book, again. I often see his partner, accompanied by another fresh face in a shiny suit, but he always seems in a sudden hurry to get elsewhere when he spots me.

  • Welcome to this little offshoot of the series of tubes! It’s nice to see a fresh face in the tube-osphere.

  • Thank you!

  • Oh, so maybe it’s just that MY JWs are polite with me, too. Haha, sounds like you’ve had some success in at least causing a little bit of doubt. Well done!

  • Michael Ray

    After four years of meeting regularly with a pair of Jehovah’s Witnesses, why do you continue to meet with them?

  • Michael Ray

    As a JW I am happy to hear the discussions are pleasant and interesting. It shows that both sides can co-exist in peace.

  • Snowflake

    I have no idea how I did it, but I seemed to have lost my pair of JW’s at home. They set up shop on Main Street and we exchange pleasant hellos.

  • Snowflake

    Perhaps trying to understand each other. We do all have to share this earth. Getting along makes it better.

  • Gary Parker

    Once I see them at my door clutching that book, I tell them up front, “I’m not interested, I’m an Atheist.” We’re both polite, they immediately leave, end of story. Coincidentally, that just happened this morning. I am recently retired, but this was at 11:00 AM on a Thursday morning. Afterwards, I couldn’t help but think, “This is mid-day on a workday. Don’t you guys (seemingly a 40-something married couple) have day jobs?” Also, I’m curious – is that book a JW-specific “translation” or just some other Christian bible like KJV, NIV, etc.?

  • They come to my door. I’m always polite, I guess because I know that many of them do not want to be knocking on doors, but have to.

  • Almost a chimp

    They’ve had their own version, the New World Translation, since 1950, but before that they just interpreted the KJV to suit, as of course do all of the hundreds of Christian demoninations*, sub-denominations, ad infinitum.
    Very big on Revelations, they’re quite the end-times cult.

    *not all use the KJV, but there are literally hundreds, if not thousands of differing interpretations from just a handful of ‘official’ Bibles.

  • Michael Ray

    They do it because the Bible teaches Christians to do it. Jesus did it and the apostles did it. It is one method of advocacy. There are of course other methods. And when you believe in something, you attempt to advocate it to others. This website is an example of that.

  • Michael Ray

    I agree.

  • Snowflake

    Bit of a difference. I choose to visit this website.

    If an unexpected visitor rings my doorbell, I have to run down two flights to answer it. I guess that’s fair as my unexpected visitors have to hike up a steep hill to my house ;-).

  • Not really. I write solely for my fellow atheists. I am not here to deconvert anyone.

  • Mike Cooley

    Come on. You obviously feel strongly about atheism. Your website is proof. Nothing wrong with that. But the fact that JWs go door-to-door is also proof they feel strongly about their beliefs – again nothing wrong with that. But to say these two JWs have been visiting you for four years, but they ‘don’t really want to knock on doors but have to’ is an assumption on your part. Believe me, if a JW did not believe in the religion, they would not go knocking on doors. It is a very time-consuming and difficult task -as you can imagine.

  • Chakat Firepaw

    Remember that with groups like the JWs and the Mormons there are social consequences for not toeing the line on things like doorknocking. There are going to be quite a few that are doing it because they consider what they will have to deal with if they don’t worse than a long walk and a lot of slammed doors.

    As for the ones GM sees, I would presume that she knows more about those particular people than you do. She would hardly be the only person to invite religious doorknockers in for a rest, a bit to eat and/or drink and a chance to talk about something else.

  • Michael Ray

    They have been visiting her for four years…4 years. If they didn’t believe in what they were doing, they would have stopped by now. Their actions speak much louder than your negative assumptions. It is very unfair of you to presume otherwise. And no, most people do not invite us in. It is very rare. So the homeowner likely finds something positive about it.

  • Chakat Firepaw

    You are confusing why they go out and do it in general for why they might visit a particular person on a regular basis.

    Doing it in general is going to be motivated by something ranging between “I really believe in doing this!” and “if I’m not seen doing this, I’m going to probably lose access to my children.” There are going to be ones that are out there to bring The Word™ to people and ones who are out there for no other reason than because they don’t want the community to find out that they haven’t really believed in years.¹

    For repeatedly visiting someone who there is little to no chance of converting, there are also multiple potential motivations. While “I can do it if I just keep trying,” might be one early on, do you really think “I’m not going to win with her, but she’s a friend and I enjoy our chats over tea,” never happens?

    For GM, there really are people who will invite religious doorknockers in for no other reason than to be nice to them. This is more commonly aimed at the Mormon ones, due to the way many of them are treated by their own leadership during their required missionary work².

    1: If you read ex-believer sites, “I pretended for years/over a decade after I lost faith,” is not just a repeated story but a downright common one.

    2: Insufficient food, expected to keep going when sick, not given access to proper medical care, having crises at home hidden, (or worse, being told about them and then expected to continue on), etc. N.B.: I’m not claiming this as universal, just that there is enough that it is a known issue.

  • Anat

    You can co-exist in peace with non-JW much better if you just stop bothering people.

    When I was home I occasionally got door-knockers (not sure which denomination) come by. Somehow they left me alone after hearing I read the Bible in Hebrew.

  • Michael Ray

    Nope. I am so grateful Jesus “bothered people” and as his disciple I too will “bother people” by sharing the good news of the gospel.

  • Anat

    Well, then at least accept that to many people your behavior is damn rude. There is no polite way to go on and on about stuff that others are not interested in.

  • Ivlia Vespasia

    Why brag my daughter had her own personal pair of JWs visiting every fortnight for the 5 years with were living in the city. When we lived on the other side of the city we were friends with all the Mormons and they would all come to visit and bring the new recruits to meet us This was in spite of them knowing that we were uninterested in becoming Mormon, my husband is religious but not conventionally so, my daughter has attended an evangelical African church since she was 8 and I am RC. In spite of this we had groups of young Mormons staying over sleeping on the floor and we were invited to the weddings of a number of the Missionaries both in the UK and the USA . Not bad for unbelievers but a good step for tolerance towards all. ps: my friend was also invited to the weddings and she is Muslim, they were inclusion of all beliefs which isn’t often mentioned in the various comments that are made about Mormons

  • Michael Ray

    Anyone can be “rude” in the way they speak to others. If done politely, it is not “rude.” And no one is forced to converse. It is a free exchange in both directions. Perhaps you are confusing being “rude” with simply disagreeing with the idea presented. Jesus is a wonderful role model for anyone. And he felt spirituality was important. So he engaged in a ministry to advocate spirituality. He instructed his followers to do the same. “Go and make disciples” are his famous final words on earth. And no, his disciples should never be rude. But some are. If so, they are acting outside his teachings.

  • Anat

    There are places where people go in order to discuss their views. Internet discussion groups for instance. My private doorstep isn’t such a place.

    As for Jesus – he allegedly committed environmental crime for no reason, allegedly was cruel to animals for no reason, and then if he is the same as his dad then he is responsible for everything bad in the universe.

  • Mike Cooley

    If that is how you feel, then put a sign on the door or inform them next time to no longer be “bothered.” They will put your name on a list and discontinue visiting your residence. That is your right.

  • Mike Cooley

    No God, no universe. Thank you for the exchange.

  • R Stemmler

    Doesn’t their religion ‘command’ them to witness?

  • Anat

    If a god capable of creating universes exists, they can sit back and not create a universe until they have it right. A universe where small children can die of cancer is not a universe worth creating. Nor a universe where one in three children born die before age 5 which was a very common condition until not so long ago.

  • I think so.

  • Michael Ray

    You are confusing not believing in God with not understanding God.

  • Anat

    I do not believe a personal god of any kind exists. But if a god existed they are a failure. They don’t deserve anything from any decent person. (And any god worthy of the name wouldn’t want worship from people.)

  • Anat

    Oh damn it. Looked you up. You are a flaming homophobe and transphobe too (of course, should have expected it). There is no possibility of civil conversation with you because under it all there is so much hatred. Into the block list with you.

  • Michael Ray

    I am not a “phobe” I just don’t believe in either transgenderism (see science) nor homosexuality (see science, physiology, anatomy & reason). But I believe as human beings, they should be afforded basic human rights. You on the other hand, would deny those basic human rights to preborn human beings and stand by while they are executed by the millions. So if anyone is a “phobe” it is you. You are a fetusphobe. You suffer from fetusphobia.

  • Michael Ray

    I so overestimated the logic and wit of atheists. I was under the impression you were the wizards of reason. Another myth bites the dust.

  • Rena

    One angry atheist is not resentative of us all. Just like one narrow minded, hateful, bigoted Christian represents all Christians. PS: Jesus was a Humanist.

  • Rena

    If you’ve never been a victim of rape or incest and left pregnant, your opinions about carrying a “preborn” are marginal. I hope you have adopted several unwanted children, clothed, fed and paid for their health and education also. Those of us who are very worried that men use this issue as a means to hold power over women’s reproductive rights are also concerned for the right to the lives of those already here needing love, attention and quality of life. If men were the ones who gave birth, we wouldn’t even be having this discussion.

  • Maura Hart

    nice to meet you. i find that greetin jw’s nekkid makes ’em run like the wind

  • Michael Ray

    I agree not one person represents all. But is Anat’s pro-abortion, pro-gay, pro-transgender view representative of atheists? And what do you mean, “Jesus was a Humanist?”

  • Michael Ray

    You should be thankful some men care enough to save the baby and mother from abortion. Abortion reaps two victims; 1 dead…1 wounded.

  • Michael Ray

    Funny how your defense of abortion is to refer to the 1% of circumstances (rape & incest). So what about the other 99%? Are you in agreement with pro-lifers that “convenience abortions” are immoral?

  • Michael Ray

    And I could say to you, “Unless you have been dismembered by abortion, chemically burned to death by abortion, or had your skull punctured and brains sucked out by an abortionist, then your opinion is marginal.” Rena, have you ever personally been a victim of abortion violence?

  • Mike Cooley

    You’re not trying to “deconvert anyone” you say. Did you forget your comment from 11 days ago? Here it is: “Haha, sounds like you’ve had some success in at least causing a little bit of doubt. Well done!”

  • Mike Cooley

    And JWs choose to get up in the morning, dress, meet with others and knock on doors. You the householder chooses to answer the door or not. We all have choices.

  • Rena

    Victim of abortion violence? That doesn’t make sense. If had been, I certainly wouldn’t know it! But I know of many who are victims of being unwanted, unsupported, unloved, miserable people who should never have given birth. I also personally know of several men, and we’ve all heard of them in the news as well who have gone to great extents to persuade women to abort their mistakes and indiscretions so the men don’t have to take responsibility for their mistakes. And the women are left to bear the burden. Women used to be “sent away to live with their aunt in Timbuktu “ to bear unwanted pregnancies that ruined their lives because the spineless men couldn’t take responsibility.

  • Mike Cooley

    That’s correct Rena, you “wouldn’ know it” because you would be dead…killed that is. An abortion would have killed you. And that is why you should oppose abortion. No one has a right to take anyone else’s life, with one possible exception of life-saving self-defense. Other than that we all have a right to life.

  • Rena

    I’ve never believed that abortion should be used indiscriminately for the sake of convenience. It should never be an easy decision. But the issue transcends abortion statistics- it includes the fact that society for some reason is compelled to restrict
    a woman’s right to make decisions about her own health and body- that men feel it is their right to dictate how we deal with personal issues dealing with our bodies. I repeat- if men were the ones who give birth, we wouldn’t be having this conversation. Believe it or not, most of us are actually sensitive human beings who don’t take these issues lightly. But most of the men involved are just relieved when the “problem “ is resolved and the evidence of their involvement is gone. I’m close to 70 years old and have spent a lifetime observing these issues and the damage done by restricting a woman’s right to choose. She can also choose to give birth. Wow! Removing reproductive education is deadly to fetuses, so encourage your fellow conservatives to help save those millions of fetuses by allowing accessible birth control and education. Makes sense, right? And I repeat- you should adopt as many of those unwanted children as you can, or stop advocating the elimination of a woman’s right to choose.

  • Mike Cooley

    And if you want to justify killing the ‘unwanted’ then I guess the homeless would be next on your list…then the mentally ill…then the orphans…the handicapped & disabled. Rena’s Hit List =homeless, mentally ill, orphans, the elderly, handicapped…disabled. And I thougth atheists were ‘live and let live’ types. Guess I was wrong. Oh I forgot, atheists have always been killers – see Communism.

  • Mike Cooley

    Rena you are correct…many spineless men out there. That is why religions has always promoted marriage first, then sex. It isn’t a guarantee but it increases the odds.

  • Rena

    Absolutely not. I work to help the homeless and the disabled. You are completely uninformed and ignorant of what Humanists believe, so either educate yourself or withdraw from the dialogue-abortion is NOT the goal- it is a last resort, but available as a choice if necessary. You would never understand the feeling of having no choice and having to bear a child because men dictate you to. So you sound ignorant.

  • Michael Ray

    You are deflecting away from what abortion is. Do you know what it is? Do you know what the abortionist does to the living…living preborn baby / fetus ? Do you realize, the abortionist is a paid killer? His job is to kill…kill the living and alive preborn baby? Are you familiar with the methods he uses? The preborn baby is where it is suppose to be, nestled comfortably and safely in the mother’s womb. So to kill the baby, the abortionist has to utilize violent methods and lethal tools -poisons, sharpened objects, scrapers, clamps for twisting and removal of body parts and suctioning machines. And early chemical abortions: the abortionist gives the mother a drug to kill the baby, sends the mother home with another drug to force a premature birth. The mother sits on a toilet and gives birth – to a dead baby. That is abortion.

  • Michael Ray

    I sound moral -unlike you. You view preborn babies like they are garbage, trash to be disposed of. And it that is what Humanists believe, then I am not impressed.

  • Rena

    Oh yes Michael- you are so moral. You are the perfect human being. But apparently limited. People who see themselves as morallly superior to others are probably locked inside the religious box. Being a Humanist means I believe you are totally entitled to that opinion. I don’t judge you for that, as long as you don’t prevent me from exercising my rights. As I said before, the issue of abortion is much larger than the emotional arguments people use to block out the discussion. The ideal world would include never having to have abortion. But women don’t exist in the ideal world when men and religion keep trying to keep them powerless to live their lives in the best possible way. After you’ve been impregnated either violently or not, say, unintentionally, especially when the man disavows responsibility and you are forced to be host to the result of that because other self righteous people say you must- then talk about what that’s like. Yes, it is tragic that cells completely unaware (undeveloped brain) are removed, but the overwhelming and indisputable tragedy is the girl (as young as 15 in many cases) or the woman , often poor and incapable of supporting a child, is left with the emotional dilemna of either of carrying it for nine months inside her and having to give it up or the equally upsetting decision of aborting, neither of which you are in a place to even discuss. As I said before, this should never be an easy choice, and it never is, but when “morally superior, self righteous” men attempt to assert their personal religious or moral judgments on these already distraught women, it only adds a burden to an already difficult situation. I feel fortunate that I am able, after 70 years of life and experience, to assess individual situations for their own merits and not judge people for their decisions until I know the details and have walked in their shoes. Being a Humanist has opened a world of freedom from the restraints of other’s moral judgments. I’ve never felt more free to see the whole picture and also to keep my moral beliefs basically to myself. Unlike religious people, I would never tell you what your moral obligations are or that I know what will happen to you after you die. Have a nice life, but don’t tell me how to live mine…best of luck to you.

  • Yes, it’s a byproduct of what I do. I don’t feel bad about causing doubt, but I’m not trying. I do this for my fellow atheists.

  • Michael Ray

    Your reply totally ignores what abortion is. I would hate to attend a baby shower with someone like you.

  • Rena

    Don’t worry, you’d never be invited. You are obviously not comprehending what i’ve written, but that’s ok, too. As a Humanist, I have tolerance and understanding for other’s opinions, unlike most people of organized religion. I’ve attended and celebrated numerous baby showers, my own children’s included and i’ve Not judged the women at those showers who had had abortions in their past and were now celebrating. And you obviously also missed my comments about it never being an easy or frivolous decision. If the men involved in these pregnancies ever took responsibility and stood up like real men to accept their part instead of disavowing responsibility, this thing you are so opposed to may not be so necessary in certain situations. It’s a very lonely place to be in and some day when you mature, you may become less sanctimonious and more understanding and forgiving of people who must make those choices. I doubt it, but maybe. Through the years, I have learned tolerance and understanding for people like you who seem so intractable in their naivety. Good luck.

  • Raging Bee

    If done politely, it is not “rude.”

    Bothering people in their homes, and spouting obvious nonsense, bigotry and lies, is rude, no matter how polite your tone or words. And insisting you’re not being rude, when others are clearly offended by your conduct, is also rude.

  • Raging Bee

    Yes, your stated beliefs do indeed make you a “phobe.”

  • Raging Bee

    No, our view of fetuses is that they’re still parts of their bearers’ bodies (which we do NOT consider “garbage,” as so many Christians clearly do), and therefore cannot be ascribed full human personhood.

  • Michael Ray

    Do you agree the fetus is a separate body (DNA) from the mother?

  • Raging Bee

    No, it’s not separate — it’s literally wired into the mother’s body and lives at her expense.

  • Michael Ray

    You misunderstand. Yes the fetus is connected to the mother’s body, but it is not her body. For example, if a miscarriage occurs, the preborn baby dies, but the mother does not. So they are two separate bodies. You agree with that do you not?

  • Raging Bee

    No, they are not separate until one is outside of the other.

  • Michael Ray

    Now you are playing dumb. They are connected via umbilical chord but they are two distinct human beings. You agree with that don’t you?

  • Raging Bee

    They cannot be considered “distinct” as long as one is inside, and wired to, the body of the other. And the former cannot be considered a person until it is outside of the other person, without diminishing or even denying the latter’s personhood.

  • Michael Ray

    Geneticists, embryologists and biologists would disagree with your denial of the “distinct” nature of a preborn baby. Science is not on your side.

  • Raging Bee

    Science agrees with us that you cannot, even in theory, grant personhood to a fetus without significantly diminishing the personhood of its bearer. To call the fetus a person with rights, is to reduce its bearer to the status of a vessel or a slave. This is why it is wrong to pretend fetuses are full persons when they’re still living inside — and at major risk and expense to — other persons who already have full rights and responsibilities.

  • Michael Ray

    You are incorrect. Science says nothing about ‘personhood.’ That is a legal term. It does however say the preborn are distinct and separate human beings from their mothers. My 1993 college textbook, LIFE, states this regarding conception: “When the two cells meet and their nuclei merge, that is precisely what happens – a new human being is conceived.” Note it describes the newly conceived as a “new human being.”

  • Michael Ray

    My goodness Bumble Bee, you are comparing pregnancy to ‘slavery?’ (If it is ‘slavery’ then it would be more accurate to describe it as “temporary” slavery – nine months) But thank God for it, for it is how we all came into this world. Bringing a child into the world is a miracle and a beautiful one at that. It saddens me to see that Humanists have degraded pregnancy and the gift of life it bears.

  • Raging Bee

    Yes, it’s a legal term, and this is a legal, constitutional and moral issue. A woman has the right “to be secure in [her] person…” and that means she has the right to choose whether she gets pregnant or not, and to terminate a pregnancy if she so chooses. That’s not a scientific issue.

  • Michael Ray

    Yes she has a right to not get pregnant, but once she is pregnant, the “new human being” -the baby, is already here. It is too late to put the ‘jack back in the box.’ At that point society’s moral obligation expands to caring for and protecting BOTH the mother and the preborn baby.

  • Raging Bee

    No, that point is after the baby is born. Before that, the bearer’s right to control and be responsible for her own body still supersedes the fetus’s rights.

  • Mike Cooley

    As a Humanist you are as bigoted as the non-Humanist. Your bigotry toward defenseless and innocent preborn babies proves that.

  • Mike Cooley

    Rena, how do you feel about feticide laws? For example, in Florida, if a drunk driver hits a pregnant woman and kills both mother and preborn baby, the driver is charged with TWO homicides. How do you feel about that?

  • Nick Kavanagh

    Yep, and you can make the choice not to bother me with your unwanted bullshit. Don’t you dare knock on my door to share your “good news” because you are going to get a loud and violent removal from my PRIVATE property, asshole.

  • Wilko Lunenburg

    You have made it clear, you do not like abortion. So don’t have one.

  • Podo

    I’ve been reading your blog for a short time now, but I’m shocked to hear that you are located in my province! I love your work and I’m happy that you’re doing it in one of the safest places in the world to be so outspoken.