How’s a L’eggs pantyhose ad campaign like Christian proselytizing?

How’s a L’eggs pantyhose ad campaign like Christian proselytizing? September 16, 2019

Years ago when I worked for an advertising agency in New York City, there was an older guy on the staff whose claim to fame was that he had ages before created the original ad campaign for L’eggs pantyhose.

Remember L’eggs? They were those women’s pantyhose introduced in 1969 under the Hanes brand that came in white plastic containers shaped like chicken eggs. Get it?—L’eggs.

Well, anyway, the purpose of the L’eggs campaign was to convince women that their brand of hosiery was superior to all others in the market. This was signaled by its funny name and cute, innovative containers, implying that the company—and this particular product—were light years ahead of their dowdy, same-same “competition.”

So, it was a campaign to deceive women into thinking something that was not true. Women certainly needed pantyhose, of course, but not necessarily, as the campaign implied, only this one kind.

I was reminded of this when I saw this quote (embedded in the image here) from Clive James, a popular Australian author, critic, poet and memoirist who has lived in the United Kingdom since 1962.

Advertising in religion, a.k.a. “indoctrination,” is different than selling L’eggs because there is no actual, material product on offer. What Christianity is marketing is an idea that, for all intents and purposes, appears to be made up, because no material evidence can be presented that undergirds it.

But, make no mistake, like the L’eggs agency, American Christianity has become expert at selling its “product,” an invisible, omnipotent deity, to an unsuspecting public.

As always, buyer beware.

Image/The Atheist

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