October 26, 2005

I’ll be daily blogging (starting one week before Advent) about Advent to record some thoughts about Gospel texts and how they can be used to foster our readiness for Christmas. It would be fun to get some involved in this so we could all work on it together. Read more

October 26, 2005

Pastors have a nearly impossible task. Especially pastors of mega-churches. Because they are asked to do so many things, speak at so many other functions, and render judgment on nearly everything that comes along, pastors can develop one of two orientations: humility about the task or what I call “P-Bics”: Pastors of Big Churches Syndrome. |inline Read more

October 26, 2005

Pastors have a nearly impossible task. Especially pastors of mega-churches. Because they are asked to do so many things, speak at so many other functions, and render judgment on nearly everything that comes along, pastors can develop one of two orientations: humility about the task or what I call “P-Bics”: Pastors of Big Churches Syndrome. |inline Read more

October 25, 2005

Of all the crosses I see on churches, I like the Methodist cross the best: a cross, an empty cross, with the sign of the Spirit surrounding it. Can it get more complete? You computer folk could do better than I, but here is a link to one. Read more

October 25, 2005

Of all the crosses I see on churches, I like the Methodist cross the best: a cross, an empty cross, with the sign of the Spirit surrounding it. Can it get more complete? You computer folk could do better than I, but here is a link to one. Read more

October 25, 2005

I promise not to blog (much) about the gospel in the immediate future, but it is a topic so central to what we do (and believe) that it deserved some attention. On top of its importance, I’m trying to give Embracing Grace a bit of a context. The gospel is easy to distort and I see distortions in these ways: |inline Read more

October 25, 2005

I promise not to blog (much) about the gospel in the immediate future, but it is a topic so central to what we do (and believe) that it deserved some attention. On top of its importance, I’m trying to give Embracing Grace a bit of a context. The gospel is easy to distort and I see distortions in these ways: |inline Read more

October 24, 2005

Summary (Brad Bergfalk) Houston moves from describing the “Heroic Mentor” and the “Stoic Mentor” to what he calls the “Secular Psychotherapeutic Mentor.” Houston asserts that the “therapeutic mentor” is the most pervasive of the three in American culture. The “therapeutic mentor” finds its embodiment in the psychoanalytic revolution of Sigmund Freud and later Carl Jung. Whereas previous civilizations were grounded in some kind of religious foundation, the post-psychoanalytic revolution is wholly secular. According to Houston, the psychoanalytic theory succeeded in… Read more

October 24, 2005

Summary (Brad Bergfalk) Houston moves from describing the “Heroic Mentor” and the “Stoic Mentor” to what he calls the “Secular Psychotherapeutic Mentor.” Houston asserts that the “therapeutic mentor” is the most pervasive of the three in American culture. The “therapeutic mentor” finds its embodiment in the psychoanalytic revolution of Sigmund Freud and later Carl Jung. Whereas previous civilizations were grounded in some kind of religious foundation, the post-psychoanalytic revolution is wholly secular. According to Houston, the psychoanalytic theory succeeded in… Read more

October 24, 2005

George Barna, in his new book Revolution, claims the primary source for the new generation’s spiritual formation is shifting away from the local congregation model to a more fragmented model. That is, we get what we need from the sources we know about, but not all of them (or even the primary one) is our local church. So, I’m keen on asking this: What about you, where do you see your primary source for spiritual formation? (Don’t ask me to… Read more

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