December 14, 2018

Former GOP senator and family values champion Rick Santorum is humiliated on CNN after legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin points out the hypocrisy of the religious conservative defending Trump.

Yesterday on CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin mocked Santorum for “making excuses for paying off porn stars.” The discussion concerned Trump‘s payments to women he’s had sexual affairs with to keep them quiet before the 2016 election. Commenting on the story Santorum said:

To me, the most damaging thing is the fact that the president hasn’t come clean over the course of time.

Toobin then jumped in to poke fun at Santorum’s hypocrisy:

Anderson, Anderson, Anderson. Putting aside the whole issue of how amazing it is to listen to Rick Santorum, who made his entire career — successful for a time — on the basis of morality in politics, making excuses for paying off porn stars and women with whom you’ve had affairs, putting that to one side, isn’t the reason…

At that point a visibly upset Santorum interrupted Toobin, declaring:

Jeffrey, you’re not going to put that to the side. I’m not making excuses for Donald Trump having an affair with a porn star. I mean, that’s disgusting, that’s tawdry. I’m addressing the question as to what is the illegality involved here, and the illegality is not the contribution. The illegality is not reporting it. I’m not condoning it. And don’t suggest that I am.

Toobin replied:

Isn’t the reason he’s lying because he did something bad in the first place?

Commenting on the story, DeadState notes:

According to various reports, Trump was at an August 2015 meeting that investigators believe was part of an illegal scheme to violate campaign finance laws to help Trump win the presidency.

Santorum, who is a conservative Catholic and a Republican, has made his name in politics as a gay-bashing, prudish, family values religious conservative. And he is no stranger to controversy. In 2015, as a GOP presidential hopeful, Santorum made the absurd claim that President Obama had established “a secular theocracy” that represented “a very serious threat to liberty in America.”

In addition, Santorum has advocated for putting Bibles back into schools, and has argued that the separation of church and state is not an American idea, but a communist idea.

Bottom line: Former GOP senator and family values champion Rick Santorum was humiliated on CNN after legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin pointed out the hypocrisy of the religious conservative defending Trump and “making excuses for paying off porn stars.”

(H/T DeadState)

Rick Santorum Humiliated On CNN After ‘Making Excuses For Paying Off Porn Stars’ (Image via Screen Grab)
Rick Santorum Humiliated On CNN After ‘Making Excuses For Paying Off Porn Stars’ (Image via Screen Grab)
April 28, 2015

Secular theocracy? Former Senator and presidential hopeful Rick Santorum claims President Obama has established “a secular state religion” that represents “a very serious threat to liberty in America.”

In a recent interview with the Family Research Council’s Tony Perkins, Santorum accused the federal government of deliberately attacking those who do not accept the “secular orthodoxy” of the Obama administration.

Santorum told Perkins that, for the first time ever in U.S. history, religious liberty is under assault from a new secular theocracy:

For the first time in the history of our country, the government is attacking people, prosecuting people, calling for people to be rehabilitated, constraining in the military with our chaplaincy. We now see chaplain after chaplain being dismissed for not accepting the secular orthodoxy that this administration wants to put forward, criticizing people for holding biblical truth and counseling them in a biblically coherent way. We see businesses being prosecuted. We see all sorts of activity on the legislative front, where they are pushing — as we saw in Indiana — pushing bills that simply protect employees’ rights to be able to practice their faith consistent within an employment situation. And those things which were unanimously passed are now being fought against.

It’s a hostility to religion that we’ve never seen in the history of our country. And I read an interesting article the other day; it’s actually not the free exercise of religion that is being attacked, it’s actually a new religion that is being established. So we have the state establishing a new religion, a secular state religion, a secular orthodoxy that everybody is going to have to comply with.

We have the state establishing a new religion, a secular state religion, a secular orthodoxy that everybody is going to have to comply with. We have now the secular church that is being imposed on this country and anybody that defects is subject to persecution and prosecution. That is a very serious threat to liberty in America.

The idea that the U.S. has somehow recently come under a secular theocracy is becoming a popular meme for conservative Republicans intent of frightening and manipulating their conservative Christian base.

Recently Republican presidential hopeful Mike Huckabee promised that if elected president he would fight the “secular theocracy” that is supposedly destroying Christian liberty in America.

Appearing on an episode of James Robison’s Life Today television program, Huckabee said that if he was elected president he would have “God’s blessing” to fight the so-called “secular theocracy” that has been imposed upon the American people by atheists and humanists.

On the program, the host, televangelist James Robinson, declared:

We have a theocracy right now. It’s a secular theocracy!… Forced on us!

An excited Huckabee replied:

That’s it!

The notion of a “secular theocracy” is an absurd oxymoron. The word “secular” denotes attitudes, activities, or other things that have no religious or spiritual basis; while the word “theocracy” indicates a system of government in which priests rule in the name of God or a god. Thus a secular theocracy is like a round square, a semantic contrivance that would be amusing if not for the depressing fact that such rhetoric is used to confuse and bamboozle the simple minded.

For the record, the United States was founded upon secular values. Santorum, Huckabee, and other religious conservatives are simply wrong when they try to claim that the U.S. is or was a Christian nation. The United States is, was, and always has been a secular nation. Claiming the United States is a “secular theocracy” insults the the intelligence, the U.S. Constitution, and hard-won common sense.

(Image via Facebook)
(Image via Facebook)
March 16, 2015

Theocracy alert: Former senator and Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum calls upon an audience of pastors and Christian activists to save America by putting Bibles back in the public schools.

Santorum rallied an audience of Christian extremists by suggesting educators should defy a Supreme Court ruling against school-sponsored Bible readings while speaking at the Awakening, a conference organized by the Liberty Counsel, an anti-gay, Christian extremist organization.

Speaking at the conference on Saturday, Santorum argued that the U.S. needs to return to God, saying the U.S. is at a crossroads:

We are on a crossroads in American history, a crossroads that looks like we are heading down in a direction that, let’s be honest, no civilization has ever been able to recover from.

Santorum continued:

The left cannot be successful in a country of God-given rights. It can’t. Because they want to be the purveyor of rights, and if God is the purveyor of rights, then they lose. We have an obligation to educate, to form, within our churches to preach, within our families to educate, and to fight within our schools. Why are Bibles no longer in public schools? Don’t give me the Supreme Court. The reason Bibles are no longer in the public schools is because we let them take them out of the public schools.

The former presidential candidate concluded:

How much are you willing to sacrifice? One person got the Bibles out of the schools. We have more than one person here! But you’ve got to have the same passion in preserving our country as they do to transform it.

Let’s be honest, Bibles have always been in the public schools, and students have always been free to read the Bible. When Santorum says he wants to get Bibles back in the public schools, he is really saying he wants public schools to teach and promote Christianity.

Santorum is a confused and intellectually inept individual, promoting a dangerous agenda rooted in Christian extremism. Previously, Santorum made the absurd claim that the separation of church and state is not an American idea, but a communist idea.

Santorum and other Republican presidential hopefuls like Mike Huckabee advocate for what amounts to a Christian theocracy: a dangerous impulse that poses a real and present danger to the U.S. and the secular values upon which the nation was founded.

(H/T Right Wing Watch)

Former senator and Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum
December 2, 2014

Former senator and Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum claims the separation of church and state is not an American idea, but a communist idea.

Right Wing Watch reports former senator Rick Santorum disputes the existence of the separation of church and state in the U.S. Constitution, dismissing it as a Communist idea that has no place in America.

Santorum made his unfortunate and erroneous claims while speaking in a conference call with members of right-wing pastor and failed Virginia Lieutenant Governor candidate E.W. Jackson’s STAND America.

Responding to a caller claiming President Obama is pushing for and accomplishing “a number of the tenets of ‘The Communist Manifesto,’ including the amnesty, the elevation of pornography, homosexuality, gay marriage, voter fraud, open borders, mass self-importation of illegal immigrants and things of that nature,” Santorum said:

“The words ‘separation of church and state’ is not in the U.S. Constitution, but it was in the constitution of the former Soviet Union. That’s where it very, very comfortably sat, not in ours.”

Technically, Santorum is correct, in so far as the words “separation of church and state” are not found in the U.S. Constitution. However, the sentiment and meaning behind the phrase is contained within the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…

The actual phrase “separation of church and state” is derived from a letter written by President Thomas Jefferson in 1802 to Baptists from Danbury, Connecticut, and published in a Massachusetts newspaper soon thereafter. In that letter, referencing the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Jefferson writes:

Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should “make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof”, thus building a wall of separation between Church & State.

Previously Santorum expressed his disgust with a classic speech delivered by President John F. Kennedy articulating the constitutional demands for a separation between church and state.

Santorum said that watching John F. Kennedy’s classic 1960 address affirming the separation of church and state made him want to “throw up.”

The following is an excerpt of Kennedy’s historical address to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association, delivered 12 September 1960 at the Rice Hotel in Houston, Texas; an address in which Kennedy clearly and boldly reaffirmed the separation of church and state:

I believe in an America where the separation of church and state is absolute; where no Catholic prelate would tell the President — should he be Catholic — how to act, and no Protestant minister would tell his parishioners for whom to vote; where no church or church school is granted any public funds or political preference, and where no man is denied public office merely because his religion differs from the President who might appoint him, or the people who might elect him.

I believe in an America that is officially neither Catholic, Protestant nor Jewish; where no public official either requests or accept instructions on public policy from the Pope, the National Council of Churches or any other ecclesiastical source; where no religious body seeks to impose its will directly or indirectly upon the general populace or the public acts of its officials, and where religious liberty is so indivisible that an act against one church is treated as an act against all.

Santorum fails in many ways, and on many levels. Yet there can be no more certain proof of his intellectual incompetence than his failure to understand the simple fact that the separation of church and state is central to the U.S. Constitution and the secular values upon which this nation was founded.

(H/T Right Wing Watch)

Rick Santorum
March 27, 2014

Failed presidential candidate and wannabe movie mogul Rick “Frothy” Santorum has a smutty anime secret – his “faith-based film studio” is backed and managed by a major player in the production and distribution of adult anime content.

Currently “Frothy” Rick Santorum is the CEO of EchoLight Studios, a Texas-based production company focused on making “family-friendly, wholesome, Christ-centered entertainment.” Santorum’s manager and backer at EchoLight Studios turns out to be Gen Fukunaga, an expert in the production and distribution of adult anime content, i.e. pornographic cartoons.

Fukunaga is the investor who helped get EchoLight off the ground, and has been manager of EchoLight since its inception in 2011. Adult shows brought to North America by Fukunaga’s FUNimation include the racy Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt. FUNimation’s website describes the show as follows:

“Panty and Stocking are nasty angels who were banished from the pearly gates for being foul-mouthed bad girls! Now they spend their days hunting ghosts in the lecherous abyss between Heaven and Earth. Panty likes sex, Stocking likes sweets, and their afro-sporting main man Garter Belt has a fetish we can’t mention. Together, they’re keeping the streets free of bodily fluids!”

Other adult anime shows like Girls Bravo are also distributed in North America by FUNimation. In one particularly graphic sexual scene of Girls Bravo, a young female character simulates oral sex on a banana while a male onlooker experiences sexual gratification by watching. The scene is, by any measure, downright pornographic.

So much for family values.

(H/T The National Memo)

August 12, 2015

Former US Senator and current GOP presidential candidate Rick “Frothy” Santorum has slipped in the polls to the bottom of the field with an underwhelming zero percent support.

A new NBC poll shows Santorum at zero percent, sharing the bottom with former New York governor George Pataki.

Santorum, an extreme Christian conservative, is obviously failing to excite the base of the GOP.

Despite spewing outrageous nonsense meant to titillate, his numbers are abysmal.  

Recently Santorum made the oxymoronic claim that President Obama had established a secular theocracy in the US, accusing the federal government of deliberately attacking those who do not accept the “secular orthodoxy” of the Obama administration,and claiming that, for the first time ever in U.S. history, religious liberty is under assault from a new secular theocracy.

secular theocracy

Last March Santorum called upon conservative Christian activists to save America by putting Bibles back in the public schools. Santorum rallied an audience of Christian extremists by suggesting educators should defy a Supreme Court ruling against school-sponsored Bible readings while speaking at the Awakening, a conference organized by the Liberty Counsel, an anti-gay, Christian extremist organization.

santorum religious freedom

And last December the wacky and extreme social conservative made the absurd claim the separation of church and state is not an American idea, but a communist idea.

santorum

Thanks for the memories Rick “Frothy” Santorum, good luck with getting a new gig on Fox News!

santorum

frothy x2

(Images via Facebook)

September 18, 2018

Conservative Christian and U.S. Senate candidate for Mississippi Chris McDaniel claims 99 percent of rape allegations “are just absolutely fabricated.”

McDaniel, in an interview with the American Family Association’s Bryan Fischer, discussed the recent allegations of sexual assault being made against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Speaking on the conservative Christian program Focal Point, hosted by Bryan Fischer, McDaniel was asked about the alarming allegations being made against Kavanaugh. McDaniel replied:

I’m tired of all these made up scandals frankly. We have a system where Judge Kavanaugh is obviously well suited for, and they’re going to drag something up even theoretically, allegedly from all those years ago that all of a sudden disqualifies this man. All of a sudden, he’s a terrible human being. No not a chance. I don’t fall for it anymore. I hope the American people aren’t falling for it. These allegations 99 percent of the time are just absolutely fabricated.

Note: McDaniel is not only claiming that Kavanaugh’s accuser is a liar, he is also suggesting that 99 percent of all women coming forward to report crimes involving sexual assault and rape are also liars.

McDaniel’s absurd claim is offered with no evidence, and is patently false. However, he is not the only Republican who has made false and absurd claims concerning rape. For example, Snopes documents the following absurd and false claims made by Republican leaders in the recent past:

On 24 March 1990, Texas oilman Clayton Williams, the Republican nominee in the Lone Star State’s upcoming gubernatorial election, said:

“Rape is kinda like the weather. If it’s inevitable, relax and enjoy it.”

On 19 August 2012, U.S. Representative Todd Akin of Missouri, a Republican who was challenging incumbent Democrat Claire McCaskill for her seat in the U.S. Senate, said:

“If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to shut that thing down.”

On 20 January 2012, Rick Santorum, a former U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania who was then campaigning for the Republican presidential nomination, said:

“Rape victims should make the best of a bad situation.”

On 23 October 2012, Richard Mourdock, the Republican candidate for one of Indiana’s U.S. Senate seats, said:

“Even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that God intended to happen.”

On 23 June 2013, Jodie Laubenberg, a Republican member of the Texas House of Representatives, said:

“In the emergency room they have what’s called rape kits, where a woman can get cleaned out.”

And Lawrence Lockman, a Republican member of the Maine House of Representatives, once said:

“If a woman has (the right to an abortion), why shouldn’t a man be free to use his superior strength to force himself on a woman? At least the rapist’s pursuit of sexual freedom doesn’t (in most cases) result in anyone’s death.”

Bottom line: Chris McDaniel, a conservative Christian and a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate from Mississippi, says he does not believe the allegations of attempted rape against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh because 99 percent of such allegations “are just absolutely fabricated.”

GOP Senate Candidate Claims 99% Of Rape Allegations ‘Are Just Absolutely Fabricated’ (Image via Twitter)
GOP Senate Candidate Claims 99% Of Rape Allegations ‘Are Just Absolutely Fabricated’ (Image via Twitter)
October 24, 2017

Senate candidate Roy Moore claims the Supreme Court marriage equality ruling was worse than the Dred Scott ruling upholding slavery.

Roy Moore, the GOP Senate candidate in Alabama, is a dangerous religious extremist that wants to make gay sex illegal and turn the U.S. into a Christian theocracy.

Confirming the fact that Moore is a deplorable human being and distinctly unqualified to serve as an elected official in any capacity, Talking Points Memo reports that late last year the candidate declared that the Supreme Court’s decision legalizing gay marriage was “even worse” than the notorious 1857 Dred Scott ruling that upheld slavery.

In a podcast interview last November Moore said:

In 1857 the United States Supreme Court did rule that black people were property. Of course that contradicted the Constitution, and it took a civil war to overturn it. But this ruling in Obergefell is even worse in a sense because it forces not only people to recognize marriage other than the institution ordained of God and recognized by nearly every state in the union, it says that you now must do away with the definition of marriage and make it between two persons of the same gender or leading on, as one of the dissenting justices said, to polygamy, to multi-partner marriages.

We’ve got to go back and recognize that what they did in Obergefell was not only to take and create a right that does not exist under the Constitution but then to mandate that that right compels Christians to give up their religious freedom and liberty.

Talking Points Memo notes:

Moore wasn’t the only one on the religious right who compared Obergefell to Dred Scott. It became a talking point from Christian conservatives like Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum two years ago. But Moore clearly went a step further by saying the decision was worse, not just listing it as another decision from the court he thought was terrible.

The fact is, Moore is a conservative Christian’s wet dream, a dangerous religious extremist who places his Christian faith above the U.S. Constitution, and believes that “God is the only source of our law, liberty and government.”

In fact, Moore was removed not once, but twice, from his position as Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court for his refusal to obey the law because it conflicted with his extreme Christianity. Once because he refused to obey a federal order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state supreme court, and another time for refusing to obey the Supreme Court decision affirming marriage equality.

Indeed, the GOP senate candidate believes that God punishes the U.S. for immoral behavior, and “God’s law” can invalidate federal court decisions.

Earlier this year Moore declared:

God is the only source of our law, liberty and government.

In addition, recently Moore told Vox that the U.S. Constitution was written to “foster religion and foster Christianity.”

Moore rejects science in favor of religious superstition, and rejects the indisputable fact that biological evolution is true. Recently Moore explained his rejection of science to the Washington Post, claiming:

There’s no such thing as evolution… That we came from a snake? No I don’t believe that.

Moore, like Trump, is a white nationalist and a birther who repeatedly questioned Barack Obama’s eligibility to be president.

Bottom line: Roy Moore is a dangerous Christian extremist who argues gay marriage is worse than slavery, and he is also on his way to being the next U.S. Senator from the sad state of Alabama.

Roy Moore: Marriage Equality Worse Than Slavery (Image via Twitter)
Roy Moore: Marriage Equality Worse Than Slavery (Image via Twitter)
July 11, 2017

Stupid for Jesus: Led by conservative Christians, a majority of Republicans reject higher education, claiming colleges and universities hurt the country.

A new Pew Research Center survey shows a majority of Republicans think colleges and universities have a negative effect on the U.S.

Pew reports:

A majority of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents (58%) now say that colleges and universities have a negative effect on the country, up from 45% last year. By contrast, most Democrats and Democratic leaners (72%) say colleges and universities have a positive effect, which is little changed from recent years.

That’s right, a majority of Republicans think that colleges and universities have a negative impact on the country.

The news is not all bad, Pew notes that in total, “a majority of the public (55%) continues to say that colleges and universities have a positive effect.”

However disappointing, the fact that a majority of Republicans are rejecting higher education is not that surprising. In fact, a hallmark of the contemporary Republican party has always been a prominent anti-intellectualism.

Leading the rejection of higher education is conservative Christian extremists that make up the base of the Republican party.

Anyone familiar with the recent political landscape understands that the conservative Christian values that currently dominate the GOP all too often translate into anti-intellectual policies. From climate change denial to teaching creationism in public schools, the current GOP seems determined to reject intellectual and scientific progress while embracing extreme Christian dogma.

Denigrating higher education is a familiar and well worn tactic of conservative Republicans. As a 2012 Republican presidential candidate, Rick Santorum gave voice to the fears of the anti-intellectual, conservative Christian, when he attacked proposals made by President Barack Obama to boost college enrollment.

During the campaign Santorum claimed Obama was trying to “indoctrinate” students. Fearing that a college education may lead many students to abandon religious belief, Santorum lamented:

62 percent of kids who go into college with a faith commitment leave without it.

Santorum’s fears are fears shared by many other religious conservatives. Yet while it may be true that after acquiring the critical thinking skills that come with a higher education many may abandon religious superstition, this fact speaks not to the poverty of education, but to the poverty of religious belief.

Bottom line: The Republican contempt for higher education is growing, and the destructive and harmful effects of the anti-intellectualism embraced by many conservative Christians poses a clear and present danger to the long term health and welfare of the nation.

 

There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that ‘my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.

Isaac Asimov

But I think that there are things about the United States that aren’t really recognized sufficiently, so it’s important to remember that until 1945, the United States was a cultural backwater. It wasn’t part of the modern world…. So, a good part of the country is still [adhering to] what’s been traditional. It’s just not part of the modern world. Just take a look at the statistics. The religious fanaticism, there’s just nothing like it in the world. I mean, one of the problems with getting people interested in global warming is that about 40 percent of the population thinks that Jesus is coming in 2050, so who cares, you know.

– Noam Chomsky

Anti-Intellectualism: Republicans Reject Higher Education (Image via Facebook)
Anti-Intellectualism: Republicans Reject Higher Education (Image via Facebook)
August 25, 2015

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton promises that if elected she will defend the separation of church and state.

Clinton was speaking at a townhall meeting in Las Vegas last week when Daniel Little, a college student and a member of the Secular Student Alliance, asked the former secretary of state her opinion on the separation of church and state.

Clinton replied that she supports the separation of church and state, and promised to defend it if elected. The following is a transcript of the question and answer via Friendly Atheist:

Little: Hello. My name is Daniel Little and I’m at CSN currently — the College of Southern Nevada. I’m a current political science major. And I’m a part of the Secular Student Alliance. Have you heard of that? Okay, basically, it’s a group of freethinkers and skeptics in schools. And currently — there’s a little fact here for you — in a few states, their Constitution has it written… that it is illegal for a nonbeliever to hold public office. With that, I wanna know: What are your current opinions about the separation of church and state.

Clinton: Well. I am very supportive of the separation of church and state. I think it’s good for both the state and religion. And we have so much diversity of thinking in the country, and part of the reason why this American experiment has lasted is because there’s a lot of different ways for people to express themselves, to believe what they want to believe, or choose not to believe, so I think the separation of church and state has served us very well, and I will certainly defend it.

(Audio available on C-SPAN)

Supporting the separation of church and state should not be a controversial issue. However, many Republicans, and many conservative Christians, dispute the existence of the separation of church and state in the U.S. Constitution, because the words “separation of church and state” are not found in the U.S. Constitution.

However, the sentiment and meaning behind the phrase “separation of church and state” is contained within the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…

The actual phrase “separation of church and state” is derived from a letter written by President Thomas Jefferson in 1802 to Baptists from Danbury, Connecticut, and published in a Massachusetts newspaper soon thereafter. In that letter, referencing the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, Jefferson writes:

Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should “make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof”, thus building a wall of separation between Church & State.

Yet despite these historical facts, many Republicans refuse to acknowledge and seek to abolish the separation of church and state. GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum has even gone so far as to make the absurd claim that the separation of church and state is not an American idea, but a communist idea.

The good news: A majority of U.S. citizens prefer presidential candidates who believe religion has no place in government, according to a CNN poll released earlier this year.

As for Clinton, in a fiery speech delivered last April at the sixth annual Women in The World Summit, Clinton made a powerful argument that deep seated religious beliefs must be changed so that everyone can enjoy full participation in every aspect of society. After discussing the pressing social justice issues of domestic violence and women’s reproductive health, Clinton said:

Laws have to be backed up with resources and political will. And deep-seated cultural codes, religious beliefs and structural biases have to be changed.

By daring to state the obvious, by daring to support the separation of church and state, and daring to say that deep seated religious beliefs must be changed, both in the U.S. and around the world, Clinton is taking a bold stand for social justice, and the progressive, secular values upon which this nation was founded.

Bottom line: the separation of church and state is central to the U.S. Constitution and the secular values upon which this nation was founded. Any presidential candidate who refuses to support the separation of church and state is not qualified to hold the office.

(Image via Wikimedia)
(Image via Wikimedia)
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