Indiana’s Religious Freedom Law and Holy Week

Indiana’s Religious Freedom Law and Holy Week March 31, 2015
Photo Source: Flickr Creative Commons by Waiting for the Lord https://www.flickr.com/photos/waitingfortheword/
Photo Source: Flickr Creative Commons by Waiting for the Lord https://www.flickr.com/photos/waitingfortheword/

Indiana’s governor is at the center of a firestorm because he signed a religious freedom law.

I am aware that any Catholic blogger, especially a Catholic blogger who writes about politics, should be all over this.

But I’m not going to do it. Not this week.

This is Holy Week, and I need the time with Christ. I think a lot of other people do, too. Sad to say, this issue, and its many ramifications, is not going to go away. Religious freedom is under attack in this country.

I could easily write a strong post about this, as well as the outrageous attempt at intrusion into Church governance that is occurring in San Francisco.

However, this is Holy Week.

I write this blog for one reason: To contribute to the work of equipping Christians to stand for Christ at the intersection of public life and faith. However, I understand something that I’ve seen a lot of Christian culture warriors forget: This is not about changing the culture to our viewpoint. It is about faithfulness to Christ.

We must take time to be with Jesus. That means, among other things, deep prayer on a daily basis, reading the Scriptures every day, and mass as often as you can get there. It also means relaxing a bit and trusting Him.

I’ll say this again: This is Holy Week.

This is the week when God showed all the world for all time the depth, width and breadth of His love for us.

We are in a serious struggle to retain religious freedom in this country. The reason we are in this struggle is not because we have failed at power politics — although by every objective criteria, we have failed.

We are in the situation of fighting for religious freedom in a culture that engages in Christian bashing because we have failed in our mission to be the light. While we were blasting away at our enemies with the full-tilt ugliness of power politics, we forgot that our first call is to bring people to Christ.

Redemption is not won at the ballot box. Redemption was won once and for all by Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ at the cross.

This is Holy Week, when each of us should be thinking on that Cross. We should consider, for at least one week, the miracle of our salvation. We need to ponder and appreciate the unfathomable mercy of a God who poured out His life’s blood in an agony of public shame, humiliation and torture that we might be washed clean by that blood and given eternal life.

It is no accident that this final Passover on Calvary took place at the time of year when the first Passover is celebrated. In Egypt, the Israelites slaughtered a perfect lamb and then marked their doorways with the blood of the lamb so that the angel of death might pass them by. Scripture tells us that it was “the Lord’s Passover.”

When Jesus approached John the Baptist at the Jordan, John announced Him by saying, “Behold, the Lamb of God.” This was a clear prophecy of Jesus’ Passion. It was also a public testimony that Jesus was the Messiah, the Son of God.

Jesus is our Passover from death to life. He is the perfect lamb whose blood redeems all humanity with one perfect atoning sacrifice. If we are marked with His blood, the angel of death will pass us by.

Jesus died that we might have eternal life. That is how much He loves us. It demonstrates as nothing else can the depth of His mercy towards us.

This is Holy Week. We need to think on these things, to take time apart from the yelling and carrying on of political fighting and pray for guidance and strength in how we proceed in the days ahead. Because we are not called to leadership in the broader world. We can called to followership in the Kingdom of God.

We need to go to the cross and kneel there in the dirt and blood of our own sinfulness and be converted to an ever deepening life of following Him, wherever that leads, whatever it costs.

We are going to be called to much more than ballot box Christianity. We have a harder task before us than political activism. We must convert the culture for Christ, and we must do it one person at a time.

This is Holy Week.

Take time to worship, pray, meditate and recommit to the fight ahead. Consider the viciousness of the attacks the Governor of Indiana is suffering and understand who is behind them. You are not part of that dark army. Turn your back on replying with equal viciousness.

Go to the cross and fit yourself for this battle by believing that this Jesus who is dying there is Lord of all creation. Understand that even though He is God, the God, He will not force us to follow Him. We, like Mary when the Angel Gabriel stood before her, must give our fiat to His grace and His dominion over our lives.

Give Him your will. Decide to do what He wants from now on instead of following your own understanding. Do the holy thing, even when it’s not the smart thing as the world reckons smartness. Enlist in the Lord’s army for real.

We need to be far more holy than any of us have been up to now. We need to become true disciples.

We can only do that if we follow Him without question. Trust and obey, the old hymns says. There is only one way to be happy in Jesus, and that is to trust and obey.

Scripture tells us that if we draw near to God, He will draw near to us.

Draw near to God this week. Therein is our strength and our power. We will not win this fight if we battle for our own selves and our goals. Forty years of political fighting that has left us with dust and ashes is proof of that.

We will only succeed in our call to convert the culture if we yield up ourselves and become part of that great army of the cross. Our message is salvation paid for by the incomprehensible price of the death of God.

That is our faith. It is who we are. It is who we must be if we are to be pleasing to Him. Before we convert the culture, we must first be converted ourselves.

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12 responses to “Indiana’s Religious Freedom Law and Holy Week”

  1. Very good advice. I was wondering what you thought of the Indiana religious law controversy. I’ll await your post. I’m totally infuriated with the secular reaction to it. But I’m burnt out on politics myself. The world is coming apart at the seams (all due to the US pull out from Iraq) and we’re pondering letting a middle east country get a nuclear weapon which will cause a nuclear race in the very volitile middle east. All i know is that it’s beyond my power to change, and so I’ll just cling to Christ this week.

    On Holy Thursday I was given the honor at my parish to being one of the twelve to have their feet washed. I assume it’s an honor, but thinking that Pope Francis washes the feet of twelve criminals perhaps my pastor thinks I’m a cook…lol. No seriously it’s a great honor. And then on Friday I will be going to a Way of the Cross procession that makes fourteen stops for the fourteen stations of the cross. It’s an almost three mile procession. I went last year and it was great. You can read about that here:

    http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/2014/04/photo-essay-way-of-cross-2014.html
    Have a blessed Holy Week.

  2. Just so sad to see america ripping itself apart over the basic freedom to respect God and during holy week! Just weird to see…but wait till the supremes redefine marriage everywhere!

    • Whatever they do, the fellow we lamentably put in the White House twice has already redefined it in his mind. This is what we get for electing shallow leaders like him. My only concern is that he no longer seems to be an anomaly. Instead he seems to reflect the vacuous nature of our entire culture. It makes me envy the Romans who at least thought their insane emperors were just that, insane; we choose instead to debate the malarkey ours throws at us regularly as if it were intellectually respectable.

  3. Dear Rebecca,

    How providential that you state we have failed to be light when in yesterday’s readings (linked below) we are reminded that we are called to be “a light to the nations, that [God’s] salvation may reach to the ends of the earth.” I wish I had these thoughts yesterday as I reflected on this passage.

    http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/033115.cfm

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