Naturopath Treats Boy with Rabies Infected Saliva – Loses License

Naturopath Treats Boy with Rabies Infected Saliva – Loses License November 25, 2018

Earlier this month, a British Columbia Naturopath surrendered her license to the College of Naturopathic Physicians of B.C. Anke Zimmerman had been under scrutiny for treating a 4-year-old boy with saliva taken from a rabid dog. After posting a blog on her website about the treatment, several authorities began investigating the naturopath. However, Zimmerman did not get in trouble for giving rabies-infected medication to a child. The board grew concerned about a treatment she provides to children with autism. Zimmerman gave up her license because she refused to stop counseling patients that vaccines are dangerous.

In Canada, naturopathy is less regulated than in the United States. Canadian law states naturopaths do not have to disclose whether treatments are scientifically tested and effective. The government tests all natural products for safety rather than effectiveness.

Due to this regulation oversight, naturopaths in Canada have a lot of wiggle room to prescribe untested alternative treatments. If Health Canada approves medication as a “Natural Health” product, a practitioner can use the medicine on patients.

In a blog post, Zimmerman shared she used Lyssin on a 4-year-old-boy. Because Health Canada approved Lyssin, the law permitted Zimmerman to use the treatment on the child. However, her rationalization for using Lyssin is what got her in trouble.

According to her post, the boy exhibited signs of restlessness, aggression toward other children, feared werewolves, and he growled at people. Zimmerman concluded that a dog bite that that child sustained at age two caused his issues.

She believed the dog that bit the boy recently received a vaccination for rabies. After the dog got the rabies vaccine, he bit the child. Zimmerman thought that the dog infected the boy with the disease from the recent vaccination.

Now if that is not crazy enough, Zimmerman decided that to cure the boy she needed to treat him for rabies. Her solution for the boy was to give him Lyssin. Lyssin is a “medication” derived from the saliva of rabid dogs. The infected saliva medication allegedly rids the body of rabies.

Howard Greenstein, the director of College of Naturopathic Physicians of B.C., reviewed the post on her website. He stated that Zimmerman’s belief on vaccinations did not align with how the immunizations work. For instance, a rabies vaccination in a dog cannot spread rabies to humans. The treatment prevents rabies from infecting dogs with the fatal disease.

An investigation was opened into her practice by the College of Naturopathic Physicians of B.C. Through the investigation, the college hoped to determine if Zimmerman properly treated the boy with Lyssin. However, the research by the college led to her dismissal from practicing naturopathy.

In Canada, Naturopaths cannot tell any of their patients not to use vaccines. However, Zimmerman is an outspoken opponent of vaccinations. Her website details her belief that vaccines cause autism.

Even though there is no scientific evidence of a  link between vaccines and autism, Zimmerman provides therapy to patients for curing autism. Her use of the specific treatment caused the most concern for the college.

According to a report in the Victoria Sun, the college suspected the therapy did not align with the regulations of the college.

“The college also conducted an investigation into Zimmermann’s use of CEASE therapy, an acronym for “complete elimination of autism spectrum expression.” Advocates of the therapy claim that homeopathy can be used to eliminate autism, based on the premise that autism is caused by vaccines, something that has no backing in scientific evidence.

The college investigated whether Zimmermann’s practices were in line with their immunization standard, which says naturopaths must not provide patients with anti-immunization materials, nor can they counsel patients against immunizations without a properly documented medical rationale.”

After the college discovered Zimmerman’s potential breach of regulation, they scheduled a formal inquiry between Zimmerman and the college. In the meeting, Zimmerman refused to abide by the rule of not providing anti-immunization education and treatments.

Zimmerman told the board that complying with the bylaws of the college would make it difficult for her to practice. She felt that she could not work with integrity. Because she refused to comply, she agreed to turn over her license.

Following the meeting, the college banned her from practicing naturopathy for five years. However, Zimmerman states she will continue to practice as an unregulated homeopath.

The college appeared unhappy with Zimmerman’s declaration about working without a license. Although the college does not regulate homeopathy, they provided their position on unregulated homeopathy practitioners. The college president, Howard Greenstein, crafted an email on the issue.

“However, the college strongly recommends the public choose a registered health professional when seeking health care,” he said in an email. “A regulated health professional needs to meet educational, training and ethical standards that can help in the delivering of safe care. Patients should check with the appropriate college to ensure their regulated health- care provider is registered.”

Even though she handed over her license, Zimmerman says she is planning to file a complaint against Greenstein with the Ministry of Health.

For now, Zimmerman cannot practice naturopathy and harm any more children with autism. Health Canada is working to determine if they will remove Lyssin from the market.

Follow me on Facebook

Talk to Me on Twitter

Follow me on Flipboard

Follow my Boards on Pinterest

On Instagram

If you enjoy my articles, please consider a one time gift via my Buy Me a Coffee Account. I work hard to provide insightful content every day for you to enjoy.

Buy me a coffeeBuy me a coffee

Or

Subscribe and commit to a small monthly donation to support my writing. Funding provided by donations allow me to pay for images, pay contributors, and raise funding for grants for families of children with disabilities.

Subscribe to My Patreon Account

 

"CBD not approved, but it works well (for my chronical pain). Whats wrong, FDA?"

CBD Not Approved to Treat or ..."
"Chrisley reminds me of Paul Lynde, no disrespect to Paul Lynde intended."

Christian Reality Stars Facing 30 Years ..."
"The Duggars have a long and weary history of being involved with "camps." Even after ..."

Joy Anna and Austin Forsyth Live ..."

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Nonreligious
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Jim Jones

    > The college [of homeopathy] president, Howard Greenstein, crafted an email on the issue. “However, the college strongly recommends the public choose a registered health professional when seeking health care.”

    I think my irony meter exploded.

  • B.A.

    Katie–I thought of you this morning when I read a story on Huffingtonpost.com about the man who wrote the “Shrek” films. He is an anti-vaxxer and he compared being called an anti-vaxxer to be called “a {spelled-out N-word}”,the racial slur which I will not type,much less say out loud. Most regular readers of the website are liberals who believe as you and I and others on these threads,and they were rightly very critical of him. Black commenters were justifiably the most critical,correctly pointing out that a person can’t control being their race or ethnicity, but they CAN control whether or not they vaccinate their children. Check it out–especially the comments section. Have a good week.
    “B.A.”

  • wow! thanks for sharing! I would have destroyed them too!

  • WallofSleep

    Off Topic, but pretty funny: Jameela Jamil says she hopes celebrities who advertise detox teas ‘s*** their pants’

    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/good-place-star-jameela-jamil-says-hopes-celebrities-advertise-detox-teas-s-pants-205851941.html

  • naturocrit

    Katie:

    Regarding your paragraph:

    “In Canada, naturopathy is less regulated than in the United States. Canadian law states naturopaths do have to disclose whether treatments are scientifically tested and effective. The government tests all natural products for safety rather than effectiveness.”

    Is it do have to, or do NOT have to?

    I’m just wonder if you have a citation for that, either Nationally or something Provincially because, if true in terms of the disclosure, piles and piles of naturopath web sites say “from the sciences” and then include homeopathy on that ‘within’ list. I mention this because in the U.S. there’s no law I’m aware of that immediately states that naturopaths have to do this. So, if they are less regulated, is it ‘do not’? And in the U.S., the FDA doesn’t even test natural products for safety, never mind effectiveness, under the DSHEA exemption.

    Cheers,

    -r.c.

  • al kimeea

    If that wasn’t enough for anyone’s irony meter, this shirley would have popped it

    “A regulated health professional needs to meet educational, training and ethical standards that can help in the delivering of safe care.”

    Regulated snake-oil is still snake-oil, unless it’s prepared homeopathically. Then it’s water & a bit of glucose.

  • the article the content comes from for that information is cited with a link.

  • Raging Bee

    Also, FWIW, the few black people I know have absolutely no time for woo and stupidity when it comes to their kids. They vaccinate on schedule, if only because they don’t have time (and maybe don’t have sufficient insurance coverage) to deal with sick children, in addition to all the UNavoidable crap that happens to ordinary people.

  • The Bofa on the Sofa

    According to her post, the boy exhibited signs of restlessness, aggression toward other children, feared werewolves, and he growled at people. Zimmerman concluded that a dog bite that that child sustained at age two caused his issues.

    Just quoted here for …. I don’t know what the hell to say.

  • Some guy

    OK, so who the hell approved rabies virus as a “safe” treatment for anything? Also, she thinks giving someone a sample of a pathogen can prevent the disease, but she doesn’t believe in vaccination? Does she really not get the basic principles of vaccination and immunity? Also, rabies vaccines are, depending on the product, either killed (all organisms are dead) or recombinant (non-pathogenic organisms genetically spliced with the surface antigen of the target pathogen, essentially tricking the immune system into recognizing and responding to the pathogen), so there’s no way the vaccine could infect a dog, let alone enable it to infect anyone else. So, in short, what the fuck?!

  • Some guy

    Yeah — or regulated rabies virus.

  • Some guy

    Well, it depends on the medical history, i.e., did his symptoms only manifest when the moon was full?

  • Yep, I know. her level of fuckery is astounding

  • Phil

    So a collective of believers in pseudoscience (The Honourable Association of Placebo Distributers) sits in judgement over someone who practices pseudoscience. She told one lie too many even by their standards. They remove her licence and warns the public to only go to ‘official’ registered practitioners of pseudoscience to guarantee that the snake oil and nonsense they are prescribed are authentic and guaranteed not to be evidence based. After all they can’t have just anyone dishing out quackery, they do have reputations to maintain after all.

    You couldn’t make this stuff up. To wacky even for Monty Python.

  • al kimeea

    homeopathy is regulated for safety not efficacy, as is the case for most woo. Claim it’s “natural” and get a pass. The shite is advertised on the weather channel in Canada.

    Can’t remember the homeoquack’s name, Bryce Wilde, had a regular slot on a 24/7 news channel from T.O. One of the reasons we should trust his palaver was his 6000 sq ft offices. He actually listed a meta-study that refuted his quacking on his website. He still is consulted as a health professional.

    Edit – If the rabies notion, lotion or potion is past 12X, or maybe C dilution, there is little probability of any rabies being present. Big Placebo’s flu cure/remedy is a 200C dilution – the 20 million dollar duck. The amount of water required for there to be a single molecule of the substance exceeds the volume of the known Universe.

  • Some guy

    Clearly, she didn’t expect the Spanish Inquisition.