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Lectionary Reflections on Exodus 20:1-20
Sunday, October 2, 2011

So the pesky 10 Commandments have come around again, and it is, as always, difficult to know quite what to do with them. We know well enough the culture wars that have sprung up about their placement on courtroom walls, public spaces, schoolroom doors, among many other spots. Even a Supreme Court judge of the state of Alabama was forced to leave the bench because of his refusal to remove these ten from his own courtroom. These Ten Commandments have become more a political football than the subject of serious theological and moral discussion.

I have long said that every preacher needs a series of sermons on the Ten Commandments, if for no other reason that they are far more discussed than understood, far more used for point scoring than for personal and communal guidelines. Please note that I said a series of sermons, not one. No preacher can do any justice to all ten of these laws in one sermon no more than she can do justice in a sermon that compresses all of Jesus' beatitudes into one congealed mass. Each commandment deserves its own day. But unfortunately, the lectionary crowds them all into this one day in ordinary time. What to do?

Well, you could always deviate from the lectionary for the next ten weeks. I would recommend that. However, since I am following the lectionary in these brief commentaries, let me fly in the face of my own advice and offer some limited reflections on the whole. Let me state one certain fact for me as I try to appropriate what these ancient notions might mean in a 21st century world. That fact is: the first commandment controls all the rest. Let me try to explain.

Here is my translation of the first commandment: "I, YHWH, am your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, from the house of slavery; there must not be for you other gods over against my face" (Ex. 20:2-3 and Deut. 5:6-7). I have said that that is the first commandment, and in most Christian traditions it is. However, in Judaism the first commandment is only the first part of the sentence, the part preceding the demand to reject other gods. The first commandment in Judaism, then, is in fact no commandment at all. It is merely an announcement, a conviction, a certainty about the nature and activity of YHWH.

I once visited the Missouri college where Harry Truman gave his famous speech about an "iron curtain" being erected in Europe. Later at that same college, a very fine museum honoring Winston Churchill was created directly underneath a superb small English chapel, designed by the 17th century architect, Christopher Wren. In the front of that chapel, there stands a very large marble depiction of the Ten Commandments, with the Commandments written in scrolled King James English. As I looked at it, I quickly noticed that something was missing—the Jewish first commandment! The monument's list began with "Thou shalt have no other gods before me." The list was from the Westminster Catechism, a list that was used in England after the English Reformation of the 16th century.