Nietzsche Doesn’t Post Here

This blog will not be written by Friedrich Nietzsche. I, a student of Nietzsche’s writings, will write this blog. I have been deeply enough influenced by Nietzsche’s ideas to refer to many (though not all) of my ideas as at least broadly Nietzschean. Nonetheless, the ideas posted on this blog will be mine and not necessarily his.

This leaves a question to address right up front—-if this blog is actually about my ideas and not always necessarily Nietzsche’s, why not just refer to this blog as a place to find my “Finckean” ideas? Why call it at all a place to find primarily “NIetzschean” ideas? The reasons for this are that (1) at this stage in my philosophical development, my ideas are so related to his that they’re often better understood as his ideas than mine and (2) I also want to encourage wherever possible the increased discussion of ideas within broadly Nietzschean paradigms. I want to signal to the site’s visitors that if they’re interested in exploring what contemporary or “universally” philosophical issues look like through broadly Nietzschean paradigms, this is a place where they can do that. I want to encourage other Nietzscheans to contribute their perspectives here as well through comments and blog posts. I want to create a place where people of this particular basic likemindedness can compare their interpretations of Nietzsche’s philosophy and their competing views on its correctness and its applications to contemporary issues and other subjects of thought he never addressed.

So, this is not a site for Nietzsche’s ideas but a place for Nietzschean ideas.

But it’s not a place for the dogmatic preaching of Nietzschean ideas. It is not a place where everyone will necessarily agree with Nietzschean ideas. It is a place where Nietzschean ideas will seduce us to many a new venture of thought and promise nothing more definitive than that.

This is also a place where sometimes, maybe even frequently, the connections between Nietzschean ideas and our own will seem (and maybe even be) tenuous at best. Maybe I will prove not much of a purveyor of Nietzschean ideas after all. Maybe I will prove myself so distinctly different a thinker from Nietzsche as to be not really much of a “Nietzschean” at all. In that case? Alle zu besser.

About Daniel Fincke

Dr. Daniel Fincke  has his PhD in philosophy from Fordham University and spent 11 years teaching in college classrooms. He wrote his dissertation on Ethics and the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. On Camels With Hammers, the careful philosophy blog he writes for a popular audience, Dan argues for atheism and develops a humanistic ethical theory he calls “Empowerment Ethics”. Dan also teaches affordable, non-matriculated, video-conferencing philosophy classes on ethics, Nietzsche, historical philosophy, and philosophy for atheists that anyone around the world can sign up for. (You can learn more about Dan’s online classes here.) Dan is an APPA  (American Philosophical Practitioners Association) certified philosophical counselor who offers philosophical advice services to help people work through the philosophical aspects of their practical problems or to work out their views on philosophical issues. (You can read examples of Dan’s advice here.) Through his blogging, his online teaching, and his philosophical advice services each, Dan specializes in helping people who have recently left a religious tradition work out their constructive answers to questions of ethics, metaphysics, the meaning of life, etc. as part of their process of radical worldview change.


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